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Publication numberUS3275324 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1966
Filing dateSep 8, 1964
Priority dateSep 8, 1964
Publication numberUS 3275324 A, US 3275324A, US-A-3275324, US3275324 A, US3275324A
InventorsBurnside Walter M
Original AssigneeBurnside Walter M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface projectile game having additional target scoring means
US 3275324 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 27, 1966 w. M. BuRNslDE 3,275,324

SURFACE PROJECTILE GAME HAVING ADDITIONAL TARGET SCORING MEANS W23' IMM-WHW DUMP AWB;

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/ ,/z//g/Sle United States Patent O 3,275,324 SURFACE PROJECTILE GAME HAVING ADDI- TIGNAL TARGET SCORING MEANS Walter M. Burnside, 324 S. Orchard, Waukegan, Ill.

Filed Sept. 8, 1964, Ser. No. 394,734 16 Claims. (Cl. 273-126) My invention relates to an amusement apparatus employing a playing piece, such as a puck, which is projected by a player at one of several target objective switches.

One of the objects of my invention is the pro-vision of an amusement apparatus of the foregoing character which may be played by one or two players with the purpose of each making as high a score as possible.

Another object of my invention is the provision of an amusement apparatus of the foregoing type which may be played by two players and which affords an opportunity for direct competition between the players, whereby either of t-he players selectively may attempt to increase his own score or reduce the scoring opportunities of the other in the course of play.

A further object of my invention is the provision, in an amusement apparatus of the foregoing character, of a ball projector arranged to oscillate about a pivotal axis and to be selectively actuated as by a puck projected against a target objective switch, the bia-ll projector propelling a ball or the like radially to impinge on one of several target objective switches so as .to actuate the same and effect a scoring.

Other and further objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from the following description when the same is considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. l is a perspective view of a game apparatus embodying the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary plan view, on an enlarged scale, of the play field of the apparatus.

FIG. 3 is a plan view, on an enlarged scale, on the selector control panel.

F-IG. 4 is an elevational view, on an enlarged scale, of the display panel indicating the number of plays or shots taken by the player.

FrIG. 5 is an elevational view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 5-5 of FIG. 1, with certain parts broken away to show details of construction.

FIG. 6 is a rear elevational view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 6--6 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 7--7 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 8-8 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlargedv scale, taken substantially on line 9-9 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 10 is a cro-ss-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 10-10 of FIG. 5.

FIG. ll is a cross-sectional view taken substantially on line 11-411 of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 12--12 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken substantially on line 13-13 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 14 is a diagrammatic representation of the wiring circuit.

FIG. 15 is a diagramm-atic view of the scoring unit.

IFIG. 16 is a diagrammatic view of the control unit.

FIG. 17 is a diagrammatic view of the trip relay bank, and

FIG. 18 is a diagrammatic view of a shot or play counter.

In FlIG. 1 is illustrated a game apparatus incorporating my invention. It includes a playing table 20 provided "ice with longitudinally extending side Walls 21 and supported on legs 22 at one end. The opposite end of the t-able 20 is supported by a cabinet 23 which houses the game mechanism as well as the scoring means hereinafter to be described. A control panel 24 having control means substantially as illustrated in FIG. 3 is disposed at the extreme end of the playing table 20 for ready access by the player or playersand includes control means which when actuated by a player determines the character of the game played and also effects a cleaning of the apparatus components to Icondition the apparatus for a new playing cycle.

Two series of target objectives 26 and 27 are dis-posed at the opposite end of playing table 20 and are arranged to be engaged by a puck 28 which is adapted to be propelled by a player along the playing table. The target objectives constitute operating levers for corresponding target switches disposed beneath the playing table and connected to the mechanism housed within the cabinet 23.

The cabine-t is provided with an overall transparent panel 23' rearwardly of which is disposed a panel 25 having a pair of components covered by transparent panels 30 and 30. Panel 25 likewise includes a sector or fan shaped area covered by a panel 31, player indicators 32 and 32', scoring regi-sters 33 and 33' and shot or play indicators 34. Disposed behind each panel 30 and 30 is a game component 36 and 36' respectively, presently to be described. Said game components are identical in construction and, accordingly, only one will be described with corresponding primed numerals being used to identify corresponding parts on the other component. Each component 36 and 36 includes a plurality of vertical passageways or channels which may be formed by mounting rod members 37-41 on posts 42 supported on the vertical panel 25. Ch-annel 43 communicates `at the top .with channel 44(A) by means of a substantially semi-circular arch member 45 which is surmounted over the adjacent channels. It will be observed that channel 44 extends only a fractional portion of the distance downwardly from the top, the lower remaining portion being filled in by a suitable block 46, the top surface of which is concavely curved and sloped downwardly.

Referring to FIG. 5, it will be seen that the lower end of the rod 39 terminates a short distance above the block 46 and immediately below the rod there is pivotally mounted a 'gate 47 which is operatively connected to a crank arrangement 48 operated by a solenoid 49 mounted on the rearward face of the panel 25. The solenoid when actuated, as will be hereinafter described, effects rocking of the gate 47 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 5, to afford clearance for the release of a ball from channel 44. In channel 44 panel 25 is provided with a plurality of spaced vertically aligned slots through each of which extends into the channel a switch lever 51 `adapted to be contacted by a ball or balls in the channel. The switches 52 are mounted on the rearward face 'of panel 25.

A second pair of vertical channels 53(B) and 54(C) are disposed adjacent the channels 43 and 44 and are also surmounted with `an arch member 56 which affords communication between the channels 53 and 54. A series of switches 57 like switches 52 having levers 58 are arranged in vertical registration and extend downwardly from substantially midway of the channel 53. The channel 54 `also is provided with a series of similarly arranged switches 59 having levers 61 and which extend substantially the full length of the channel. A similar pivote-d gate member 62 is disposed at the bottom of channel 54 and is operated by a solenoid 63 to swing outwardly in a counterclockwise direction and permit a ball within the channel to drop into a ball return trough 3 64 which is generally U-shaped (FIG. 7) and affords communication between channels 43 and 54. Each leg of the return trough 64 is inclined downwardly in relation to its preceding lportion so that any ball discharged from channel 54 `will roll -by gravity to the bottom of channel 43.

Referring to FIG. 9 it will he seen that the leg 64a of the trough 64 communicates with channel 43 and disposed below :said channel is a ball projector 66 which when actuated is adapted to impinge on a ball 67 in the bottom of channel 43 and to drive the ball upwardly and over into channel 44, it being un-derstood that the arch member 4S influences the direction taken by the ball in its movement.

The ball projector 66 includes a bracket 68 carrying an arm 69 pivoted as at 71 `and having a hammer head 72 which is adapted to enter through an aperture in the bottom of the leg 64a of the trough so as to impinge directly on a ball 67 -which is disposed in registration with the aperture. The opposite end of the lever 69 is provided with an end portion which is adapte-d to abut against a resilient stop element 73 to limit the striking movement of the lever in a `counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 9. A solenoid 74 is mounted on the bracket 68 and the armature of the solenoid is connected by a link 76 to the lever 69. A spring 77 connected t-o the lever 69 and to the bracket 68 normally urges the lever to the position illustrated in FIG. 9. It will be understood that the solenoid 74 is normally de-energized so that lever 69 is disposed in the position illustrated in FIG. 9. Accordingly, when the .solenoid 74 is momentarily energized the lever 69 will be caused to swing in a clockwise direction so that when the solenoid is de-energized the spring will cause the lever 69 to swing in an opposite direction whereby the hammer head 72 will strike a ball 67 with a blow, the object being to drive the ball into channel 44. It will be understood that as the ball is propelled upwardly, the adjacent ball immediately to the left, as viewed in FIG. 9, will roll into and assume the position heretofore occupied by the ball just propelled.

Disposed at the bottom of channel 53 is a similar ball projector 78 which functions identically to projector 66 to propel a ball in channel 53 upwardly to channel 54. The solenoids 74 and 163 of ball projectors 66 and 78 respectively are connected respectively to target objective switches 26a and 26b which are actuated by contact with puck 28. Solenoid 49 for operating gate 47 is connected to target objective switch 26C.

The game apparatus of my invention includes an auxiliary game component 79 which is coordinated with the operative means of the `game components 36 and 36 hereinabove described, the object of play being to increase the score of a player or to diminish the scoring opportunities of an opponent. I'he auxiliary game component 79 is disposed behind the panel 31 and includes a sector or fan shaped area 81 laid out on the panel 25 with side retaining members 8-2 and an arcuate frame 83 surmounted on said side retaining members. Referring to FIG. it will be seen that the sector area S1 is divided into relatively narrow sectoral areas, there being a plurality of tar-get objective switches 86-90, one in each sectoral area, and radially arranged in relation to the center of the sector area 81. It will be seen that the frame 83 carries a plurality of legends in close proximity to respective sectoral areas, each indicating the effect accomplished when one of the target objectives 36-90 is engaged by a projectile or ball, as will be hereinafter explained.

Disposed immediately below the sector area 81 is a projector generally indicated by the nume-ral 91. The projector 91 is pivotally supported on a shaft 92 so that it may rock about an axis which is coincident with the center of the sector area 81. The projector includes a bracket 93 having a pair of spaced upwardly directed lugs 94 which are pierced to receive the shaft 92. A lever 96 is pivoted intermediate its ends, as at 97, on the bracket 93 and is provide-d at one end with a hammer head 98.

A spring 99 is connected to the opposite end of lever 96 and to the bracket 93 so as to bias the lever in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. l0. A Ireset solenoid 101 is carried on bracket 93 and is connected to lever 96 by a link element 102. A trip element 103 is pivotally supported on the bracket and cooperates with an electromagnet 104 to retain the leve-r 96 in reset conditi-on. It will be understood that when the electromagnet is energized the trip element 103 is drawn away from engagement with the end of lever 96 causing the spring 99 to swing the lever in a counterclockwise direction to impinge on a ball 106 which is `seated in a V-shaped notch in 'a panel 107 disposed below the sector area 81.

A motor 108. with a built-in reduction gear is mounted on the rearward face of the vertical panel, the motor being provided with a crank which is connected to the projector bracket 9B by a link 109. It will be apparent that rotation of the motor 108 will effect slow oscillation of the projector 911 within a limited arc. A bracket 11\1 mounted on the projector 91 carries a pointer 112 which is disposed in front of the sector area 81 and in registration with hammer head 98. Oscillation of the projector 91 will effect corresponding movement of the pointer 112 so that the pointer will at all times indicate the relative position of the hammer head 98 in relation to a particular sectoral area and target objective switch. It will be apparent that as the hammer head 98 is caused to be actuated in any angular position of the projector, as indicated by the pointer and as will be hereinafter described, the ball 106 will be caused to be projected to impinge upon one of the target objective switches 86-90 to actuate a respective switch and thereby effect one or a series of operations, as indicated by a respective legend. The electromagnet 104 of the projector is connected to the series of switches 27 so that when the puck engages any one of said switches projector lever 96 is caused to he tripped to eifeot impingement of the hammer head 98 on the ball 106.

=It will be noted that the first three target objectives `SiaS'S designate operations which have the effect of increasing the score of a player. The fourth target objective 89 which is associated with the legend Dump Opponents Balls designates an operation in which the scoring opportunities of an opponent are caused to be diminished becausethe gate 62 in the opponents game component 31 is caused to be opened permitting the balls which may be disposed in channel 54 to drop into the trough 64 thereby diminishing the opponents scoring opportunities by the point value of the number of balls released from said channel.

Referring to FIG. 5. it will be seen that the fth target objective is identified by the legend Dump Own Balls so that when a player attempts to release the balls in a channel of his opponents game component he also yincurs the risk of releasing the balls from the channel in his own game component by inadvertently directing the ball 106 to impinge on target objective 90. This has the effect of actuating gate 62 releasing the balls in channel 54 and reducing his own score.

In order to introduce an element of uncertainty and thereby increase interest in the playing of the game, there is provided a solenoid operated ratchet means 113 which is operatively connected by link 114 to the panel 107 provided with a V notch. The panel 107 is mounted for limited sliding sidewise movement and the solenoid of ratchet means 113 is connected in parallel with the projector 91 so that with every resetting of the projector, theratchet means is actuated effecting a sliding of the panel 107. Accordingly, with each actuation of the ratchet means 113 the V notch assumes a different relative position in relation to the center point of the sector with the result that the ball position is caused to vary with each play and the player is unable to determine the exact direction in which the ball will be projected against any of the target objectives since the V notch is concealed from view by panel 31. Thus, no matter how skillful a player may become in the playing of the game, he may not expect identical results every time he propels a puck, since the positioning of the ball varies with each successive play.

For the purposes of brevity and clarity I have illustrated and described only certain features embodied in my game apparatus. The apparatus, however, includes conventional components which are part of the combination and are illustrated in :the wiring diagram which will be referred to in the description of the operation of the game apparatus.

The operaion of my apparatus is as follows. When a game is to be played a coin is inserted in a conventional slot, not shown, to energize a relay, not shown, which in turn closes a switch to the electrical supply line.

One or two players may participate in the playing of the game and may selectively utilize either component of the game apparatus in playing the game.

To begin a game, a player closes switch 116 on the control panel 24 to energize reset coils 117,118 and 119 associated respectively with shot counter 121 and score registers 33 and 33', all of which are of conventional construction. Switch 122 is closed to close a circuit to energize the solenoids 49 and 49 controlling the gates 47 and 47 respectively, whereby any balls stacked in channels 46 and 46 are released and permitted to drop into channels 53 and 53 respectively. Switch 123 is then closed to energize projectors 78 and 78 to project the balls into channels 54 and 54. Switch 126 is then closed to energize solenoids 63 and 63 controlling the ball gates 62 and 62 so that the balls in channels 54 and 54 may drop into the chutes 64 and 64' and return to the initial starting positions.

Single player game Before proceeding with the playing of the game the player selector switch including two components 127 and 127a is turned to the position indicating One- Player in which respective contacts A and B, of each, are closed. Assuming that the player desires to play garne component 36, the target selector switch 128 is rotated so that the point of the knob is directed to Puck Position in which contacts A and B of the switch 128 are closed. Assuming that the player aims at the target switches 26 which are arranged in tandem pairs and that one of the pairs of switches 26a is engaged by the puck, `the puck before rebounding to the player will always contact one of the -rearward row of switches 27. Accordingly, the following typical sequence of events occurs. Upon the closing of switches 26a, a circuit is completed through the contacts A and B of target selector switch 128 to energize a trip relay 129 which effects closing of switches 131 and 132. When any of the switches 27 of the rearward row is engaged by the puck, relay 133 is energized effecting closing of switches 134 and 136. Closing of switch 134 initiates operation of control unit motor 137 which drives a series of four axially aligned cams, each arranged to operate one or more switches associated therewith. Switch 138 operated by cam 2 now completes a circuit through contacts A and B of player selector switch 127a and through switch 131 to energize the coil 74 of projector 66 thereby projecting a ball upwardly so that it should fall into channel 44. Cam 4 also effects closing of switches 141 and 142. The closing of switch 141 effects energization of reset solenoid 143 resetting the relays 133 and 129. Even though switch 134 is now open, switch 144 actuated by cam 1 on the control unit motor 137 will maintain said control unit motor in operation for one complete revolution to the end of a cycle. Switch 142, which was hereinabove noted as being closed, simultaneously with switch 141 effects operation of the scoring unit which includes motor 146, three cams and associated switches,

and wipers 147 and 147a which traverse two concentric circular rows of contacts, 148 and 148a respectively, on a score disk. The contacts in row 148 are so wired in relation to the ball operated switches 52, 57 and 59 arranged in the channels 44, 53 and 54 respectively to pulse the score register step-up coil 149 thereby advancing score register 33 one digit for each ball in channel 44, two digits for each ball is channel 53 and three digits for each ball in channel 54.

It will be understood that when the player selector switch 127 initially was actuated to indicate One Player, contacts A and B thereof were closed. Now cam 3 on the scoring unit through switch 151 which is actuated by said cam causes delivery of two electrical pulses to step-up coil 152 whereby the shot counter is stepped up two positions. The wiper 153 of the shot counter advances two positions across the row lof contact 154 to indicate that the next shot may be made. It will be apparent that switch 156 will maintain the motor of the scoring unit in operation for one complete cycle.

Assuming that the player aims the puc-k to engage the target switches 26a` and successfully eiects closure of said switches as well as one of the switches 27., it will be seen that trip relay 157 is energized to close switches 158 and 1159" which effects energization of the solenoid 49 which will open the associated gate 47 and dump the balls from channel 44 to channel 53, Assuming that switches 26b are actuated by the puck, it will be seen that trip relay 161 is energized to close switch 162 which completes a circuit through Ithe motor of the control unit. Switch 164 operated by cam 3 delivers four pulses to solenoid coil 163 of the projector 78 .to propel any balls from channel 53 to channel 54. ball will be caused to be propelled from one channel to the other with each operation of the projector.

As was hereinabove noted, a player may elect to play the component 79 of the game apparatus. It will be understood that a player may play a complete game with either component 36 or 79 or component 36 or 79 of the apparatus or may switch at will from one component to the other in the course of a game.

In order to condition the apparatus for playing the component 79, the player rotates the knob of the target selector switch 128 so that the point thereof is direced to the legend Gun This operation opens the circuit between points A and B of target selector switch 128 and closes a circuit between points A and C thereof, thereby opening the circuit to switches 26a, b and c and closing the circuit to motor 108 to effect operation of the same. Said motor through a link 109 causes the projector 91 to oscillate within a limited arc so that the hammer portion 98 sweeps across the several target switches in both directions of movement. The arrow pointer 112 is radially aligned with the hammer head 98 and will indicate to the player the particular switch at which the hammer head is directed at any particular point in the cycle of movement. In the playing of the game, the player propels the puck so that the puck will engage any one of the switches 27 at the moment when the pointer 112 is directed at a particular switch which the player desires to be actuated in order to produce a particular result. Referring to FIG. 14 it will be seen that when one of the switches 27 is closed, relay 133V is energized causing it to trip and actuate switch 134 which closes the circuit to the control unit motor 137 and effects operation of the same. Correspondingly, switch 136 is also closed by the tripping of the relay 13-3 and completes a circuit through the latching magnet 104 of the projector 91 releasing the hammer head -98 and causing .it to impinge against the ball thereby to drive the ball against a particular .target switch. Switch 141 when actuated by cam 4 on the control unit effects energization of solenoid 101 to reset the hammer head 98 for the next shot.

As was hereinabove noted, each of the several target objective switches 86-90 when separately actuated will It will be understood that only the topmost j ponents played by one of the opposing players.

effect a different result, as indicated by the legends associated with respective target objective switches. When any of the switches 86, 87 or 88 is actuated, as when engaged by ball 106, a sequence of operations occurs corresponding to that occurring when target objective sWitche-s 26a, 26C, or 26h respectively are activated by a propelled puck. Accordingly, it is not deemed necessary to repeat the -descriptions of the sequences of operations, in this instance.

Referring to F-IGS. 14 and 18 it will be seen that the shot or play counter 121 comprises two concentric arcuate rows of contacts 154 and 174. Alternate contacts 174 are wired together in pairs and are in circuit with respective signal lamps 170 identiiied by legends One Player and Two Players. Adjacent contacts 154 are wired together in pairs. Contacts 154 and 174 are arranged to be engaged by wipers 15'3 and 173 respectively. It will be understood that a greater or lesser number of c-ontacts than that shown may be provided.

Cam 3 of the scoring unit 33` ('FIGS. 14 and l5) will close switch 1151 twice in each play cycle to energize step up coil 152 of the shot counter 121 to move the wiper 173 two steps so that the wiper comes to rest on alternate contacts 174. The lamps 170 will indicate that the circuit is conditioned for one player as designated by the legend. Correspondingly, wiper 153y will also engage alternate contacts 154 which are connected to a ban-k of lamps 175 consecutively numbered. Thus, as wiper 153 is advanced two steps, each time, consecutively numbered lamps will be illuminated to indicate the shot or play number. It will be understood that any number of lamps may be provided to record a corresponding number of shots.

Two players game In order to condition the apparatus for use by two players, player selector switch `12.7, 127g is rotated so that the control knob is directed to the legend Two Players. Referring to FIG. 14, this has the effect of engaging respective contacts A and C, of each of the switch components -127 and 127a so that when switch `172 is closed by cam 2 of the scoring unit 33, only a single electrical pulse will be delivered to step-up coil -152 of the s-hot counter 121, in each cycle, to advance the wiper `173 only one step. As will be apparent, the signal lamps 170 will light up alternately after each step to indicate which player is up next for play.

As the wiper 1173 advances, one step at a time, to engage successive contacts 174, it will be seen in FIG. 14 that the operating circuits for the components utilized by opposing players are alternately rendered effective and ineffective. Thus, when ythe wiper 173r engages the first, third, fth etc. contacts 174, a circuit is rendered effective through conductor 180 to record the achievement of one player, while when said wiper engages the second, fourth, sixth etc. contact-s 174, another circuit is rendered effective through conductor 181 for recording the achievement of the other player.

For purposes of brevity, corresponding primed numerals will be employed to identify `corresponding parts in the operating circuits of the components played by the second or opposing player. It will be understood that corresponding switches of the operating circuits which control opposing components will be actuated simultaneously. However, only one of such switches will be effective depending on which operating circuit through conductor 180 or 18=1 is effective at any particular time.

The scoring unit 33 illustrated in FIGS. 14 and 15 includes two concentric rows of contacts 148 and 148e, each related to an operating circuit of one of the com- Contacts 148 are connected to switches 52, 57 an-d 59 associated with channels 44, 53 and 54, respectively, and the number of contacts associated with each switch determines the number of impulses which will be .delivered to the step-up coil of score register 149 to record a particular point value. Thus, each of the first four contacts 148 is connected to a resepective switch 52 in channel 44. The next eight contacts are wired together in pairs, each pair being connected to one of the switches 57 in channel 53. The last series of 24 contacts are connected together in groups of three each, with each grou-p being connected to one of the switches 59 in channel 54. Wipers 147 and 147a driven by motor 146, in each cycle, wipe over rows of contacts 148 and 14851, respectively. The movement of wiper 147 across the row of contacts 148 has the effect of scanning the circuits associated with contacts 148 for closed switches, that is, switches which may be actuated by any balls stacked in channels 44, 53 and 54. Each contact 148 in circuit with a closed switch will deliver one impulse to the step-up coil of the score register 149. Thus, each of the single contacts 148 in circuit with a closed switch 52 will deliver one impulse to the score register to advance the register one digit. In the case of the paired contacts 148 which may be connected to a closed switch 57, the register will be advanced two digits and in the case of the triple connected contacts, the register will be advanced three digits. The scoring is cumulative, with the score for each play or shot being added to the total scoring of the previous plays.

As was hereinabove noted, the amusement apparatus of my invention affords competitive play between opposing players to the extent that one player may attempt to diminish the scoring opportunities of his opponent by attempting to release the balls which may have been accumulated by his opponent in channel 54 or 54', as the case may be. Accordingly, assuming that one of the players has a turn of play and desires to eifect such a result, by rotating the knob of target selector switch 128 to the legend Gun, contacts A and B of said switch are engaged. This effects operation of motor 108 which causes oscillation of the projector 91. The player now attempts to propel the puck against any of the target switches 27 so that the puck will engage one of said switches at the instant that the pointer 112 moves into registration with the target objective switch 89. Closing of one of the switches 27 by the puck completes a circuit through coil 133 of a trip relay which closes switch 136 energizing the trip magnet 104 which releases latch 103 permitting the hammer head 98 to strike against the ball 106 and project the ball in the direction of the target objective switch 89. If the -attempt is successful and switch 89 is actuated, coil 168 of a trip relay is energized to effect closing of switches 169 and 171 which are connected to solenoids 63 and 63', respectively, which operate gates 62 and 62', respectively. It will be understood that only the operating circuit for the player at play is effective so that only the circuit through conductor 180, switch 171 and solenoid 63 will be effective to operate gate 62 which is in the game component of the opponent of the player at play. When gate 62 is caused to be opened, all of the balls in channel 54 will be released and the opponents future scoring opportunities will be diminished by the point value of each ball released from channel 54.

Should the player at play miss the target objective switch 89 and instead strike switch 90, closing the same, a circuit will be established to energize coil 178 of a trip relay which closes switches 169' and 171 connected to solenoids 63 and 63 respectively. However, since only the operating circuit for the player at play through conductor 180 is effective, only the circuits through switch 169' and solenoid 63 will be effective to operate gate 62. Thus, the player at play is penalized by causing the balls in channel 54 of his own game component to be released and his own future scoring opportunities diminished by the value of the number of balls released from channel 54.

It will be understood that the opponent of the player at play in his next turn of play, or any other, similarly may attempt to diminish the scoring opportunities of the other player, hereinabove referred to as the player at play. Thus, during the opponents turn of play, the operating circuit through conductor 181 is rendered eiTective and depending upon which target objective 89 or 90 is caused to be actuated, he may cause the balls to be released either from channel 54 of the game component 36 of the other player or from channel 54 of his own game component 36.

Various changes coming within the spirit of my invention may suggest themselves to those skilled in the art; hence, I do not wish to be limited to the specific embodiments shown and described or uses mentioned, but intend the same to be merely exemplary, the scope of my invention being limited only by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a pair of adjacent vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and each arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(c) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of said channels and adapted to project a ball upwardly and into the other of said channels,

(d) a movable gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actuated to release any balls disposed therein, and

(e) means operatively connecting said ball projector and said movable gate to respective ones of said target switches whereby actuation of a switch by a playing piece will eect actuation of either of said ball projector or said movable gate, respectively.

2. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a pair of adjacent vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and each arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(c) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of said channels and adapted to project a ball upwardly and into the other of said channels,

(d) a movable gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actuated to release any balls disposed in said other channel,

(e) means controlled by at -least one of said switches for effecting operation of said projector, and

(f) means controlled by at least one of the other of said switches for effecting operation of said gate to release any balls disposed in said other cannel.

3. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) :a first vertical channel,

(c) a second vertical channel, said rst and second channels communicating with each other at their upper ends,

(d) a third vertical channel adjacent said second channel and in communication therewith intermediate the ends thereof,

(e) a fourth vertical channel,

(f) said third and fourth channels communicating with each other at their upper ends, each of said channels arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

g) a ball projector disposed at the bottom of each of said first and third channels and adapted to project a ball upwardly and into said second and fourth channels respectively,

(h) a rst movable gate disposed between said second and third channels,

(i) a second movable gate associated with said fourth channel,

(j) means controlled by certain of said switches for effecting operation of said ball projectors,

(k) and means controlled by certain other of said switches for eiecting operation of said gates to release the balls from said second channel into said third channel or to release balls from said fourth channel.

4. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a plurality of target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a pair of adjacent Vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(c) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of `said channels and adapted to project a ball upwardly and into the other of said channels,

(d) a movable gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actuated to release any balls disposed therein, and

(e) means operatively connecting said ball projector and said movable gate to respective ones of said target switches whereby actuation of a switch by a playing piece will eect actuation of either 0f said ball projector or said movable gate, respectively.

5. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a plurality of target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a projector adapted to project a playing piece against one of said target objective switches,

(c) means for actuating said projector,

(d) a pair of adjacent vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(e) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of said channels and adapted to project a ball upwardly and into the other of said channels,

(f) a movable gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actuated to release any balls disposed therein, and

(g) means operatively connecting said ball projector and said movable gate to respective ones of said target objective switches whereby actuation of a switch by a playing piece will effect actuation either of said ball projector or said movable gate, respectively.

6. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of first target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a rst playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a plurality of second target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a lsecond playing piece aimed thereat,

(c) a projector adapted to project said second playing piece against one of said second target objective switches,

(d) means electrically connecting said rst target switches with said projector whereby actuation of one of said irst target objective switches will effect operation of said projector,

(e) a pair of adjacent vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(f) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of said channels and adapted to project a ball upwardly and into the other of said channels,

(g) a movable gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actuated to release any balls disposed therein and (h) means operatively connecting said ball projector and said movable gate to respective ones of said second target objective switches whereby actuation of such switches by a playing piece will effect actuation of either of said ball projector or said movable gate, respectively.

7. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of first target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a first playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a plurality of second target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a second playing piece aimed thereat,

(c) an oscillatable projector adapted to project said second playing piece against one of said second target objective switches.

(d) means electrically connecting said first target switches with said projector whereby actuation of one of said first target objective switches will effect operation of said projector,

(e) a pair of adjacent vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and arranged to receive a plurality of Iballs in stacked relation,

(f) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of said channels and adapted toproject -a ball upwardly and into the other of said channels,

(g) a movable gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actu-ated to release any balls disposed therein and (h) means operatively connecting said ball projector and said movable gate to respective ones of said second target objective switches whereby actuation of such switches by a playing piece will effect actuation of either of said ball projector or said movable gate, respectively.

8. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of first target objective switches adapted to lbe actuated -by a first playing piece -aimed thereat,

(-b) a plurality of second target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a second playing piece aimed thereat,

(c) an oscillatable projector adapted to project said f second playing piece against one of said second target objective switches,

(d) means electrically Connecting said first target switches with said projector whereby actuation of one of said first target objective switches will effect oper-ation of said projector,

(e) a pair of adjacent vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(f) .a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of said channels and adapted to project a ball upwardly and into the other -of said channels,

(g) a mov-able gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actuated to release any balls disposed therein,

(h) means operatively connecting said ball projector and said movable gate to respective ones of said second target objective switches whereby actuation of lsuch switches by a playing piece will effect actuation of either of said ball projector or said movable gate, respectively,

(i) and means in fixed relation to said first mentioned projector and movable therewith to indicate the direction in which said projector when actuated will project said second playing piece.

9. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having both a plurality of balls and a plurality of target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) .a pair of adjacent vertical channels communicating with each other at their upper ends and arranged to receive said plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(c) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of said channels and adapted to project one of said balls upwardly and into the other of said channels,

(d) a movable gate associated with the other of said channels and arranged when actuated to release any of said balls disposed therein,

(e) means operatively connecting said ball projector and said movable gate to lrespective ones of said target switches whereby actuation of a switch by a playing piece will effect -actuation of either of said ball projector or sai-d movable gate, respectively, and

(f) means for registering the score values of said balls disposed in said channels.

10. An amusement apparatus comprising (a) a playing table having both a plurality of balls and a plurality of target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a first vertical channel,

(c) a second vertical channel, said first and second channels communicating with each other at their upper ends,

(d) a third vertical channel adjacent said second channel and in communication therewith intermediate the ends thereof,

(e) a fourth vertical channel,

(f) said third and fourth channels communicating with each other at their upper ends, each of said second, third and fourth channels arranged to receive said plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(g) a lball projector disposed at the bottom of each of said first and third channels and adapted to project one -of said balls upwardly and into said second and fourth channels respectively,

(h) a `first movable gate disposed between said second and third channels,

(i) a sec-ond mov-able gate associated with said fourth channel,

(j) means controlled by certain of said switches for effecting operation of said ball projectors,

(k) means controlled by certain other of said switches for effecting operation of said gates to release said balls from said second channel into said third channel or to release said balls from said fourth channel respectively,

(l) switch means associated with each of said second,

third and fourth channels and adapted to be engaged by said balls in each of said channels, and

(m) means in electrical connection with said switch means for registering the score values of said balls disposed in said channels.

11. In an amusement apparatus,

(a) a plurality of target objective switches radially and arcuately arranged and adapted to be actuated by a playing piece aimed thereto,

(b) a seat for supporting said playing piece and disposed in substantially close proximity to the radial center of said switches,

(c) a projector oscillatable about an axis substantially coincident with said center and adapted to project a playing piece from said seat against one of said target objective switches,

(d) means for actuating said` projector, and y (e) means for varying the position of said seat in relation to said projector with each actuation of said projector whereby to vary the path of travel of a projected playing piece.

12. In an amusement apparatus (a) a playing table having a plurality of first target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a first playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a plurality of second target objective switches radially land .arcuately arranged and adapted to be actuated by a second playing piece aimed thereat,

(c) a seat for supporting said second playing piece and disposed in substantially close proximity to the radial center of said switches,

(d) a projector oscillatable about an axis substantially coincident with said center and adapted to project said second playing piece from said seat against one of said second target objective switches,

(e) means electrically connecting said first target switches with said projector whereby actuation of one of said first target objective switches will effect operation of said projector, and

(f) means for varying the position of said seat in relation to said projector with each actuation of said projector whereby to vary the path of travel of a projected playing piece.

13. An amusement apparatus to be played by two opponent players comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of first target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a first playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a plurality of second target objective switches radially and arcuately arranged and adapted to be actuated by a second playing piece aimed theret,

(c) an oscillatable projector adapted to project a playing piece against one of said second target objective switches,

(d) first and second pairs of adjacent vertical channels, with channels of each pair communicating with each other at their upper ends and each of said pai-rs of channels arranged to receive a plurality of Iballs in stacked relation,

(e) a ball projector disposed at the lower end of one of the channels of each pair and adapted to project a :ball upwardly and into the adjacent channel,

(f) a movable gate associated with each of said adjacent channel and arranged when actuated to release any balls disposed therein,

(-g) first means controlled by said first target objective switches for effecting operation of said oscillatable projector, and

(h) second means controlled by said second target objective switches for effecting operation of either of said ball projectors or said gates, respectively.

14. An amusement apparatus to be played by two opponent players comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of rst target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a first playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) a plurality of second target objective switches radially and arcuately arranged and adapted to be actuated by a second playing piece aimed there-at,

(c) an oscillatable projector adapted to project a playing piece against one of said second target objective switches,

(d) first and second pairs of adjacent vertical channels,

with channels of each pair communicating with each switches for effecting operation of said oscillatable projector,

(h) second means controlled by said second target objective switches for effecting operation of either of said ball projectors or said gates, respectively, and

(i) means for selectively connecting said second means to both respective ball projectors and gates whereby each player may effect operation of a respective ball projector -or gate.

15. An Iamusement apparatus to be played by two opponent players comprising (a) a playing table having a plurality of first target objective switches adapted to be actuated by a first playing piece aimed thereat,

(b) -a plurality of second target objective switches radially and arcuately arranged and adapted to be actuated by a second playing piece aimed thereat,

(c) an oscillatable projector adapted to project a playing piece against one of said second target objective switches,

(d) first and second pairs of adj-acent vertical channels, with channels of each pair communicating with each other at their upper ends and each of said pairs of channels arranged to receive a plurality of balls in stacked relation,

(e) a lball projector disposed at the lower end of one of the channels of each pair and adapted to project -a ball upwardly and into the adjacent channel,

(f) a movable gate associated with each said adjacent channel and means arranged when actuated to move said gates and release Iany balls disposed therein,

(g) first means controlled by said rst target objective switches for effecting operation of said oscillatable projector,

(h) second means controlled by said second target objective switches for effecting operation of said ball projectors, and

(i) means for registering respective scores of said players.

16. The invention as defined in claim 13 wherein certain of said second target objective switches when actuated also increases the scoring opportunities lof the player at play and at least one of said second target switches when actuated effects actuation of a gate to decrease the scoring opportunities of the opponent of the player at play.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,092,286 9/ 1937 Melnick et al 273-122 X 2,127,261 8/1938 Kramer et al 273-121 2,610,058 9/ 1952 Hooker 273-121 2,878,022 3/ 1959 Koci 273-126 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,308,138 9/1962 France.

RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

L, J. BOVASSO, Assistant Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/126.00A, 273/129.00R, 273/127.00R, 273/121.00A
International ClassificationA63D13/00, A63F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0058
European ClassificationA63F7/00E