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Publication numberUS3276128 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 4, 1966
Filing dateJan 22, 1965
Priority dateJan 22, 1965
Publication numberUS 3276128 A, US 3276128A, US-A-3276128, US3276128 A, US3276128A
InventorsEli Ponich
Original AssigneeEli Ponich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bead gauge
US 3276128 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oclt. 4, 1966 E. PoNlcH 3,276,128

BEAD GAUGE Filed Jan. 22, 1965 FNVENTOR EL! POMICH United States Patent O 3,276,128 BEAD GAUGE Eli Ponich, 334 Bellwood Ave., Bellwood, Ill. Filed Jan. 22, 1965, Ser. No. 427,298 7 Claims. (Cl. 33-85) This invention relates to a bead gauge Which finds particular use in positioning of Ithe metallic corner beads on outside corners formed by intersecting walls.

The preparation of intersecting walls forming an outside corner for the finish coat of pla-ster or the like includes the application of what is referred to in the trade as a c-orner bead. These are usually formed with a pair of leg portions of very thin material adapted to overlie converging wall surfaces which intersect at right angles. Both leg portions merge into an integral raised guide channel which is disposed at an angle of approximately 135 relative to each of the associated legs. Of necessity, the leg portions are very thin and oftentimes lto enhance the adherence of the putty or finish coat of plaster are provided with holes or similar formations. Because of the requisite thinness of the corner bead, it is very easily distorted during application to an outside corner and .accordingly it must be positioned with great care.

In the past corner beads were positioned or set for fastening by manually positioning of the corner bead and -then checking for trueness with a level. While this time honored technique has been used with a certain degree of success, it nevertheless has proved to be very costly because of the time and labor which is required. The lack of a better method of application, however, has made it necessary to use the above technique, as it goes without saying that `the corner bead must be very accurately positioned since it provides the guide surface for use in applying the finish coat of plaster. Obviously, if the corner bead is improperly positioned even the relatively untrained eye will appreciate minor inaccuracies when the finish coat of plaster is applied.

The present invention provides a novel hand tool or bead gauge lto permit loutside corner beads -to be expeditiously positioned for permanent fastening with unequaled ease, accuracy and speed. Suitable means is provided on the gauge to insure that the guiding surface of the corner bead will be ultimately positioned so as to bisect the intersection `of Ithe two wall sections. The bead may then be fastened in place by conventional techniques such as nailing directly through the leg portions. The present invention permits the 4accomplishment of corner bead positioning with great rapidity as will be evident when a full description of the present invention is given below.

It -is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved corner bead gauge.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a new `and improved corner bead gauge which permits the efficient positioning of outside corner beads on walls preparatory to the application of the finish coat of plaster.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a new and improved bead gauge which is of simple and lightweightV construction and therefore economical to manufacture.

Fur-ther and fuller objects will become readily apparent when reference is made to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an outside corner formed by intersecting walls and having a corner bead thereon with the bead gauge of the present invention in the operative position for use in rapidly positioning the corner bead for fastening;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of an outside corner such as that shown in FIG. 1, with portions of the plaster lath and corner bead in cross section;

ICC

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of a modified form of bead sauge;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary top plan view of a modified form; and

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken along the lines 5--5 of FIG. 4.

Referring now to FIGS. l and 2, a fragmentary perspective and cross section view, respectively, of intersecting walls 10 and 11 is illustrated. The outer surf-ace of the walls 10 and 11 have been formed by the usual plaster la-th nailed to wall studs as is best seen in FIG. 2. The plaster lath 13 and 14 may be -of the usual popular sheetlike form nailed directly to the Wall stud 12 or the like.

The outside corner formed by the intersection of the plaster lath 13 and 14 is quite susceptible to damage if not suitably reinforced, especially on doorways, columns and the like in public or commercial buildings. In the application of the iinal or nish coat of plaster a guide `surface must also be provided at .the corner. To the attainment of this end, a corner -bead such as the one shown lat 15 is applied to the corner for reinforcement and also to form .a plastering guide. The corner bead 15 is provided with the usual relatively thin leg portions 16 Iand 17 disposed at right angles to each other and merging into an integral raised bead guide portion 18 which is angularly disposed from each of the leg portions 16 and 17. As is best seen in FIG. 2, lthe raised bead 18 is generally U-shaped being arcuately bent at the bottom and then reversely bent to merge with the fastening or leg portions 16 and 17.

Of necessity, the metal forming the corner bead 15 must be very thin in order lthat a suflicient thickness of plaster can cover the same with good adherence. Naturally, when formed of such thin material it is quite susceptible to distortion as the corner bead 15 i-s manually positioned on the outside corner formed by the intersecting wall surfaces 13 .and 14, and ordinarily great care must be exercised during positioning of -the same. Through the use of the bead gauge of the present invention, indicated generally at 20, the corner bea-d 15 may be quickly set as will become apparent.

The bead gauge 20 includes a main body portion formed by leg portions 23 and 24 each having wall engageable guide surfaces 21 and 22 adjacent the terminal end. The leg portions 23 and 24 are disposed at right angles to each other as are the wall engaging guide surfaces 21 and 22. The accuracy of the bead gauge of the present invention depends largely upon the wall engaging guide surfaces 21 and 22 lying in planes which intersect at perfect right angles. Inwardly of each of the Wall engaging guides 21 and 22 is provided a bead engaging guide 25 and 26 which is engageable with the ends of the respective leg portions 16 and 17 of the corner bead 15. The bead guides 25 and 26 form the outer margins of bead receiving grooves 28 and 27. The distance of each of the bead guides 25 and 26 from the bottom of the groove in the opposite leg will depend upon the dimensions of the legs of the bead. However, in present practice the bead guide surfac'e 25 is disposed 2% away from the groove 27 in the leg 24. In a similar manner the guide surface 26 is disposed an equal distance away from the groove 28 in the leg 23. Each of the grooves 27 and 28 merge at the junction of the legs 23 and 24 into a channel-shaped slot 29 which is of sufficient Width to accommodate the generally U-shaped raised bead 18. As expected, the central axis of the channel-shaped slot 29 is disposed 135 away from the guide surfaces 21 and 22. Thus, the axis of the slot 29 biseets the angle formed by the legs 16 and 17 on the corner bead 15 when properly positioned.

As is best appreciated by referring to FIG. 1, to install the corner bead 15, it is manually positioned so as to overlie the intersecting wall surfaces 13 and 14. The bead gauge may be placed over the corner bead 15 with the guide surfaces 21 and 22 in engagement with the walls and 11, while the outer ends of the legs 16 and 17 engage the b'ead guide surfaces 25 and 26. The usual technique is to start gauging or positioning adjacent the ceiling and work downwardly. In soifets and other horizontally disposed outside corners the tradesman can start from either end.. As the bead gauge 2li is moved downwardly it orients the legs 16 and 17 of the corner bead in perfect relation to each other and disposed the rather flexible bead guide portion 18 the appropriate distance away from the wall surfaces 13 and 14. At

'this time a suitable `fastening means such as the nails 34) may be driven through the leg to retain the same in the appropriate relation to the wall. Throughout the fastening step, the bead gauge 20 holds the corner bead 15 in perfect position while nailing is accomplished. The bead gauge 20 may then be moved down on the corner bead 15 a few inches and the process rep'eated until the entire corner bead is positioned and fastened.

From the foregoing it is obvious that the present invention permits corner beads to be positioned for fastening in an expedient and effortless manner without requiring any particular skill and yet will be sufficiently accurate so that during the application of the finished coat of plaster, the channel-shaped guide bead 18 will serve as a guide surface uniformly spaced from the planes defined by the outer surfaces of the plaster lath 15 and 16.

A modified form of the invention is shown in FIG. 3 wherein the bead gauge shown in the plan View is shaped and dimensioned in the same manner as described in connection with FIGS. 1 and 2, however, is generally I-shap'ed in cross section having an outer iiange portion 4d running continuously around the outer marginal edges and being joined by an intermediate thin web portion 41. As is also illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, suitable apertures 42 are provided which permit the bead gauge 20 to be easily gripped and also to reduce the weight without adversely affecting strength.

The end construction of the legs of each of the embodiments of FIGS. 1 3 may be formed as illustrated in the views of FIGS. 4 and 5 which illustrate a leg 50 supporting a pivotally mounted guide surface. The leg 50 is H-shaped having a central web portion 51 with outside flange portions 52 and 53. The web is tapped as at 54 to receive a screw 55 which mounts a pivotal guide member 56.

The guide member 56 is provided with a pin 57 which is received in a suitable opening in th'e web 51 and serves to maintain the guide member 56 with the guide'surface 61 extended as illustrated in the plan view of FIG. 4. A coil spring 58 urges the guide member 56 towards the web holding the pin 57 in the opening in which it is positioned.

When it is desirable to retract the guide member 56, it is raised against the force of the spring 58 and the entire member rotated so the pin 57 is moved into alignment with the opening shown in dotted lines at 60. When released the pin 57 is urged into the opening 60 under the influence of the spring. When the guide surface 61 on th'e pivoting guide member 56 is in this retracted position, the surface 62 rides directly on the wall surface or leg portion 17 `of the reinforcing bead. This design is particularly useful in those situations wherein the corner bead is attached to wire lath, the wall thickness at the outside corner is less than that of the gauge or beads of unequal dimensions are used. Also, a bead gauge employing a retractable guide surface finds use where one bead has been positioned on one outside corner and a second is to be positioned on an adjacent corner such as would be found in a doorway or the like.

It is obvious that the pivotal guide member will serve the same function described in connection with the guide members 21 and 22 and accordingly may be provided on opposite ends of the respective leg portions so that th'e bead gauge is more versatile. In the usual application the bead gauge is generally formed from metal with legs about 4%. long and 11/2 wide while the over-all thickness `of the web is approximately 1/s and th'e tiange portions 40 are 1/2. The grooves 27 and 28 are of the order of 3/16" as is the corner bead guide channel 29. Obviously, these dimensions are only exemplary of one concrete form. Also, any suitable `material such as plastic, wood and the like could be used in manufacturing the same.

While the present invention has been described in connection with a certain specific Iembodiment, numerous modications are possible and it is desired to cover all modifications falling `within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A bead gauge for positioning a reinforcing corner bead on an outside corner or the like, said bead gauge consisting of a main body portion having a pair of wall engageable guide surfaces thereon which are disposed at angles to each other, a pair of corner bead engageable guide surfaces formed in said main body portion, each of said corner bead engageable guide surfaces being disposed inwardly of and at an angle to said wall engageable guide surfaces and being adapted to engage the resilient leg portions of a corner bead, and groove means formed intermediate said guide surfaces and being adapted to slidably receive an outside corner bead thereby to position the same in proper relation to said outside walls.

2. A bead gauge for positioning a reinforcing corner bead on an outside corner or the like, said bead gauge consisting of a body portion formed from two legs intersecting at right angles, each of said legs having a wall engageable guide surface thereon, said wall engageable guide surfaces being disposed at angles to each other, a corner bead engageable guide surface formed on each of said legs, each of said guide surfaces being disposed inwardly of and at an angle to said wall engaging surfaces, said corner bead engageable guide surfaces being adapted to engage the resilient leg portions of a corner bead, and a slot formed at the intersection of said legs and being adapted to slidably receive the raised corner guide portion of an outside corner bead thereby to position the same to bisect the angle formed by said outside walls.

3. The invention of claim 1 including means provided in said main body portion of said bead gauge to facilitate gripping thereof.

4. The corner bead of claim 1 wherein said body portion is I-shaped in cross section.

5. The bead gauge of claim 2 wherein at least one of said wall engageable guide surfaces is pivotally mounted on said body portion for selective movement into and out of wall engaging position.

6. A bead gauge for use in accurately positioning a corner bead, said bead gauge including a body portion formed from two leg members extending at right angles to each other, and guide means on each of said legs, said guide means having a first guide surface for engagement with a wall surface and a second guide surface for engaging said corner bead, at least one of said guide means being pivotally mounted for extension and retraction beyond a marginal edge of one of said legs.

7. A bead gauge for positioning a reinforcing corner bead on an outside corner or the like, said bead gauge consisting of a body portion formed from two legs intersecting at right angles, a pivot-ally mounted arm means on one of said legs, said arm means having a wall engageable guide surface thereon and being selectively movable beyond a marginal edge of said leg to position said guide surface in guiding engagement with said wall, a second wall engageable guide surface on the other of said legs,

a corner bead engageable guide surface on each of said pivotally mounted arm means and the other of said legs, said bead engageable guide surfaces being disposed in- Wardly of and at an angle to said Wall engaging guide surfaces and being ladapted to engage the resilient leg portions of said reinforcing corner bead, and a slot formed at the intersection of said legs and being adapted to slidably receive Ithe raised corner guide portion of an Outside corner bead thereby to position the same to bisect the angle formed by said outside Walls.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/ 1942 Hammerl. 4/1957 Angle.

LEONARD FORMAN, Primary Examiner.

ISAAC LISANN, Examiner.

H. N. HAROIAN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2269266 *Jun 3, 1940Jan 6, 1942Herbert HammerlGauge
US2788653 *Mar 31, 1954Apr 16, 1957Angle Wallace GCorner bead gauge and plumb
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4138819 *Dec 22, 1977Feb 13, 1979Sosin Gershon JOutside corner square
US5357682 *Nov 9, 1993Oct 25, 1994Best Manufacturing Co., Inc.Cornerbead alignment apparatus
US5720114 *Aug 30, 1995Feb 24, 1998Guerin; Scott J.Tool for positioning of vinyl corner posts
US5749154 *May 20, 1996May 12, 1998Scharf; Robert E.Bull nose corner marking apparatus
US5855073 *Sep 19, 1995Jan 5, 1999Boelling; James E.Workpiece positioning tool and method using same
US6729033 *Jan 31, 2002May 4, 2004Robert Eugene JevonsThree dimensional square tool
US20060272224 *May 6, 2005Dec 7, 2006Beard's Tools, Inc.Corner molding installation tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/407, 33/613
International ClassificationE04F21/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04F21/00
European ClassificationE04F21/00