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Publication numberUS3277622 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1966
Filing dateDec 4, 1962
Priority dateDec 5, 1961
Also published asDE1409974A1
Publication numberUS 3277622 A, US 3277622A, US-A-3277622, US3277622 A, US3277622A
InventorsSvend Jensen Otto
Original AssigneeSvend Jensen Otto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexed wall or ceiling facing
US 3277622 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1966 o. s. JENSEN 3,277,622

FLEXED WALL OR CEILING FACING Filed Dec. 4, 1962 j INVW United States Patent O 3,277,622 FLEXED WALL OR CEILING FACING Otto Svend Jensen, Hammerichsgade 14, Copenhagen, Denmark Filed Dec. 4, 1962, Ser. No. 242,227 Claims priority, application Denmark, Dec. 5, 1961, 4,854/ 61 7 Claims. (Cl. 52222) The invention relates to a wall or ceiling facing, where generally channel formed, thin walled panel elements are placed beside each other, preferably with spacing between the side walls of the channels, and are fastened on supporting rails, running transversely to the panel elements and which have engaging members for disengageably holding the panel elements.

In such facings it is of crucial importance that the panel elements lie flush with each other after being mounted, especially when the front side of the panel elements are plane. The panel elements are generally arranged with the side walls of the channels mutually spaced apart, so that a relatively wide groove is obtained between them. It is furthermore of crucial importance that it is easy to mount the panel elements and that it is relatively easy to remove a single element. It is also of great consequence that it is relatively easy to carry out such variations, so that adaptation can take place according to different construction modules, and that a natural termination at the sides of the facing can be brought about without special elements that are to be adapted to the mounting place.

The hitherto known facings of the type indicated do not fulfil all the laid down requirements in a satisfactory way, and it is the object of the invention to devise an improved facing of the type indicated. The facing according to the invention is characterized in that the panel elements at the two side walls have engaging flanges that are directed obliquely rearwards to the front side of the channels and slope away from each other, and that the mutual distance between the engaging flanges when the panel elements are untensed differs so much from the distance between the corresponding sloping engaging members on the supporting rails that said engaging flanges, when engaging, press resiliently against the engaging members, and also that there are arranged stopping members, lying in a plane, against which rearwardly placed portions of the panel elements are pressed by means of the resilient engagement of the panel elements. On account of the resilient engagement it is easy to mount and dismount a single panel element without taking the neighbouring elements down. On account of the resilient pressing against the stopping members the front sides of the channels will flush with each other. By variating the distance between the engaging members on the supporting rails and thereby the mutual distance between the side walls of the two panel elements there will in a simple way be obtained an adaptation according to different construction modules.

In some cases it will be advantageous or necessary that the facing is completely closed. This may be obtained, according to the invention, by placing strip elements between the channel formed panel elements so that they lie behind the latters side walls, the front side of which strip elements form stopping members for the rear edges of the side walls of the panel elements.

The channel formed panel elements may, according to the invention, at both sides have an inwards extending flange portion, whereto the engaging flange is connected. In this way there can be obtained an exceptionally practical construction of a closed facing where the inwardly extending flange portions abut against the front side of ice the strip elements. When there is to be adaptations according to the variating construction modules, this can take place by altering the panel elements overlapping of the strip elements or by altering the width of the strip elements.

The strip elements may, according to the invention be fastened to the supporting rails by means of special engaging members on the latter. By these means an easy mounting of the facing is obtained. The strip elements may, according to the invention, have flanges, which obliquely project towards the rear of the strip elements. In this way an exceptionally easy mounting of the strip elements is obtained.

According to the invention the supporting rails may, beside the per se known punched out tongues, forming the engagement members for the panel elements, have tongues for engagement with the engaging flanges of the strip elements. When a panel element is taken down e.g. in order to allow examination of installations behind the facing, the strip elements will be held fast at the sides by means of the tongues. Taking down a panel element can be advantageous if a partition is to be set up.

The engaging flanges of the panel elements, may, according to the invention, engage with the engagement flanges of the strip elements. By these means it is obtained that there on the supporting rails only must be provided engaging members for the strip elements. Furthermore the panel elements will be held securely fast to the strip elements in the entire length, so that there is no risk of having an unwanted wide joint between them.

The engaging members of the supporting rails may, according to the invention, consist of resilient hoops that are resiliently fastened on the supporting rails. Such resilient hoops are easy and cheap to produce and mount. By employing such hoops the advantage is obtained that it is unnecessary to take specially great care when mounting the supporting rails as in the case when the engaging members consist of tongues on the supporting rails as in the latter case care must be taken so that the tongues on the supporting rails lie exactly in line with each other.

The invention will now be further described with reference to the accompanying drawings which illustrate, by way of example, five embodiments of a facing according to the invention and in which:

FIGURES l, 2 and 3 are a sectional view of three embodiments of the facing,

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view of a detail of a fourth embodiment of the facing, and

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view of a fifth embodiment of the facing.

In the FIGURES, 1, 3, 4 and 5, 1 designates a supporting rail that with advantage may consist of a U-section that is arranged with the main portion downwards. A plurality of such supporting rails are fastened parallel with each other under a ceiling (not shown).

In the embodiment shown in FIGURE 1 the supporting rail has equidistantly spaced apart sets of four engaging tongues 2, 3, 4 and 5 of which the two outermost 2 and 5 are directed slopingly towards each other, while the two middle ones 3 and 4 are directed slopingly away from each other.

On the two middle tongues 3 and 4 there are hooked rearwardly projecting resiliently engagement flanges 6 and 7 on a strip element with a plane front side portion 8.

The facing comprises substantially channel formed panel elements, that have a plane front side portion 9, obliquely rearwardly directed side walls 10 and 11, inwardly directed flange portions 12 and 13 and obliquely rearwards, inwardly towards each other directed engagement flanges 14 and 15. These engagements flanges 14 and 15 engage with the away from each other directed outermost tongues of the two tongues sets, lying beside each other. that the engagement flanges 14 and engage resiliently with the tongues and the flange portions 12 and 13 will therefore be pressed towards the rear to abutment against the front side portion 8 of the strip elements. The engaging flanges 14 and 15 do not go as far as they can under the tongues and it will therefore be possible, when taking a panel element down, to displace the panel element to the side to a suflicient degree, so that one side can be pulled away from the tongue in question.

In the embodiment shown in FIGURE 2 the supporting rails have equidistantly spaced apart sets of tongues 16, 17 and 18 of which the two outermost 16 and 17 are directed obliquely away from each other, while the middle one 18 is transversal and may lie at right angles to the main portion of the supporting rail. The side edges of this tongue are undercut. On these tongues 18 there are hooked rearwardly projecting resilient engaging flanges 19 and 20 on the strip elements with a plane front side portion.

The facing comprises furthermore channel formed panel elements having a plane front side portion 22, oblique side walls 23 and 24, inwardly directed flange portions 25 and 26 and obliquely outwards and rearwards directed engaging flanges 27 and 28 that engage with the two, towards each other facing outer tongues of two neighbouring sets. The channel formed elements have such dimensions that the engaging flanges 27 and 28 press resiliently against the tongues, and the inwards extending flange portions 25 and 26 will therefore be pressed against the front side portion 21 of the strip elements. By compressing a panel element its engaging flanges may be disengaged from the tongues so that it can 'be taken down.

The embodiment shown in FIGURE 3 corresponds substantially to the one shown in FIGURE 1, but the tongues 3 and 4 are replaced by a single tongue 29, that has the same shape as the tongue 18 in the embodiment shown in FIGURE 2. The strip elements 30 are correspondingly made for engagement with such a tongue.

In the embodiment shown in FIGURE 4 the supporting rail is made without tongues. On the supporting rails there are placed substantially U-shaped hoops, the branches of which 31 and 32 clamp tightly round the flanges of the supporting rail and at the bottom have outwards projecting engagement portions 33 and 34 that engage with flanges 35 and 36 directed obliquely inwards towards each other on strip elements with a plane front side portion 37. The top placed transverse part of the hoop is curved and lies with its middle portion resilient against the main portion of the U-formed supporting rail, which in this case lies at the top, so that the strip element is pulled upwards against the bottom edges of the flanges of the supporting rail.

The panel elements are made in a way similar to the embodiment shown in FIGURE 3 and the engaging flanges 27 and 28 engage with the outer sides of the engaging flanges of the strip elements.

The embodiment shown in FIGURE 5 has panel elements with substantially the same form as shown in FIG- URES 2 and 4. The supporting rail 1 has opposite each other directed tongues 39 and 40, each with an oblique innermost portion, a horizontal middle portion and an oblique outermost portion. The facing furthermore has narrow strips 41 with the engaging edges 42 and 43, that are bent round and engage with the outermost oblique portions of neighbouring tongues and 39, while the engaging portions 27 and 28 of the panel elements engage round the engaging edges 42 and 43 of the strips and engage behind the horizontal middle portion of the tongues 39 and 40. In this way the portions 25, 27 and 26, 28 encircle the edge portions of the strips 41 along the entire length.

In the installation of the strip elements to the supporting rails, the strip elements 41 are first snapped onto the The panel elements have such dimensions 4 tongues 42, 43, and thereupon the panel elements 22 through 28 are snapped onto the edges 42 and 43. The lateral grooves 25, 27 and 26, 28 provide engagement members with a considerable stiffness, whereas the panel elements portions 22, 23 and 24 have considerable elasticity in the lateral direction so that the lateral engagement force is not dependent on small inaccuracies of the parts. Therefore reliable engagement is obtained so that there is no danger of the panel elements falling down even though they are made of a relatively thin sheet material. Furthermore, the groove edge engagement between the groove portions 25, 27, and 26, 28 and the edge portions 42, 43 over the entire length of the element prevents any rattling between the elements.

The shown and described embodiments are only to be considered as examples, as different variations are conceivable within the scope of the invention. The facing is primarily meant for employment in the so-called acoustical ceilings where sound absorbing material is placed in the channels. If eventually ventilation through the ceiling surface is to be established at a later time elements may be removed and replaced by elements perforated for the passage of air. When placing partitions a single panel element may be taken down to make room for the partition, at the same time obtaining a uniform (inverted) appearance of the junction of the ceiling with both sides of the partition. The element, the strip element, that forms the bottom in the joint between two panel elements may be given a special colour in which way a greater accentuation of the joint is obtained. Each element can form a self-supporting termination along the long sides of the surfacing. The strip elements may be entirely left out, in which case the panel elements generally close together. In connection with vertical placing of the facing as wall surfacing the advantage is obtained, on account of the inwards directed flange portions, that sound absorbing material is effectively held fast at both sides so that there is no risk of the material falling out of the elements.

What I claim is:

1. Wall or ceiling facing comprising: a plurality of resilient thin walled'elongated panel elements in spaced side by side relationship, each of said panel elements having a face with upstanding side walls along the elongated edges thereof, said side walls being directed rearwardly relative to the face, and said side walls having on their edges remote from said face flange portions being angularly related to said side walls, said panels having a space between their adjacent edges and said panel faces being co-planar, supporting rails running transversely to the direction of the panel elements, said supporting rails having engaging means spaced therealong at panel width intervals and said side walls being fleXted to press resiliently said flange portion against said engaging means thereby disengageably holding the panel elements, said engaging means including an elongated strip element lying between adjacent spaced panels behind said flange portions, and held in place by said engaging means, said strip element having a plane front side portion parallel to said panel face plane between which and said engaging means the side wall flanges are engaged.

2. Wall or ceiling facing as recited in claim 1, wherein said side walls are directed obliquely rearwardly relative to the face and slope away from each other.

3. Wall or ceiling facing according to claim 1, in which the strip elements have rearwardly and obliquely inward directed engaging flanges.

4. Wall or ceiling facing according to claim 3, in which the supporting rails have tongues for engagement with the engaging flanges of the strip elements.

5. Wall or ceiling facing according to claim 3, in which the engaging flanges of the panel elements engage with the engaging flanges of the strip elements.

6. Wall or ceiling facing according to claim 5, in which the engaging members of the supporting rails consist of 5 resilient hoops that are resiliently fastened on the supporting rails.

7. Wall or ceiling facing as recited in claim 5, wherein the front sides of said strip element form stopping members for the rear edges of the side walls of said panel elements and wherein said panel elements have, at either side and at the innermost edge of the side wall theerof, an inwardly extending flange portion to which said engaging flange is connected.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 2,277,792 3/ 1942 Small 52497 2,424,547 7/ 1947 Bekin 52-508 2,553,363 5/1951 Droegen 52-49 2,620,750 12/1952 Watter 52222 FOREIGN PATENTS 220,009 2/ 1959 Australia.

226,325 1/ 1960 Australia.

579,248 7/1959 Canada.

240,305 4/ 1948 Switzerland.

349,398 11/ 1960 Switzerland.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

EARL J. WITMER, JACOB L. NACKENOFF,

Examiners. R. A. STENZEL, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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AU220009B * Title not available
AU226325A * Title not available
CA579248A *Jul 7, 1959Burgess Manning CoCeiling panel
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Referenced by
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US3688680 *Jul 9, 1970Sep 5, 1972Air FactorsSpaced parallel panel air diffuser assembly
US4231205 *Dec 18, 1978Nov 4, 1980United States Gypsum CompanySteel edge gypsum wall panel
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/222, 52/762, 52/506.8, 52/472, 52/779
International ClassificationE04F13/08, E04B9/36, E04B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0812, E04F13/0803, E04B9/363
European ClassificationE04B9/36A, E04F13/08B2C2, E04F13/08B2