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Publication numberUS3277886 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1966
Filing dateMay 15, 1964
Priority dateMay 15, 1964
Publication numberUS 3277886 A, US 3277886A, US-A-3277886, US3277886 A, US3277886A
InventorsRussell H Ryals, Martin V Ledbetter
Original AssigneeLedbetter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-fired liquid heater
US 3277886 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1966 R. H. RYALS ETAL GAS-FIRED LIQUID HEATER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 15, 1964 m m 5 7 m 45 r m 00 Z w i W L LN 5 J. Y PM W United States Patent O f 3,277,886 GAS-FIRED LIQUID HEATER Russell H. Ryals, Pueblo, and Martin V. Ledbetter, 617

ildna, Pueblo, Colo.; said Ryals assignor to said Ledetter Filed May 15, 1964, Ser. No. 367,667 10 Claims. (Cl. 126350) This invention relates to heat exchange devices and, more specifically, the instant invention pertains to a gasfired heating device having special application to use in conjunction with internal combustion engines, but is not limited thereto.

One of the primary objects of this invention is to provide a gas-fired heating device for use with water-cooled internal combustion engines when it is necessary that the same be operated in extremely cold regions which necessarily makes the starting of a cold engine quite difiicult and causes considerable wear to those elements of the engine which must move relative to one another during the starting operation.

A further object of this invention is to provide a gasfired heating device which may be easily connected with the water jacket of an internal combustion engine Whereby the water generally employed as the liquid coolant for the engine may be quickly warmed to a temperature sufficiently high as to raise the temperature of the engine block, the lubricants utilized therein and the lubrication system to their proper operating temperature, whereby friction between the moving parts of the starting mechanism and of the engine is greatly reduced.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide a gas-fired heating device for use in connection with an internal combustion engine, the device being readily disassembled for inspection and repair, and easily reassembled for installation on an internal combustion engine.

This invention contemplates, as a still further object thereof, the provision of a gas-fired heating device which is non-complex in construction and assembly, inexpensive to manufacture and maintain, and which is durable in use.

Other and further objects and advantages of the instant invention will become more evident from a consideration of the following specification when read in conjunction with the annexed drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a conventional automobile and showing the gas-fired heating device constructed in accordance with this invention in its operative associated position relative to the internal combustion engine;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view, FIGURE 2 being taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 2-2 of FIGURE 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged detail, medial longitudinallyextending cross-sectional view of the heating device, FIG- URE 3 being taken substantially on the inclined plane of line 33 of FIGURE 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 4 is a detail cross-sectional view, FIGURE 4 being taken substantially on the horizontal plane of line 4-4 of FIGURE 3, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged exploded perspective view of the gas-heating'device according to this invention.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, reference numeral designates, in general, a conventional automotive vehicle having an internal combustion engine 12 and provided with a water jacket 14 which includes an outer sidewall 15. Reference numeral 16 denotes the usual upright firewall which is disposed in juxtaposition relative to the rear end of the engine or motor 12.

Patented Oct. 11, 1966 An elongated substantially hollow cylindrical container 18 for a combustible gaseous medium is secured to the front face of the firewall 16 by a plurality of substantially U-shaped bolts 20. The container 18 may be filled with any suitable combustible gas, such as butane, for example, or any LP. gas, as desired. One end of the container 18 is provided with the usual gas discharge cap 22 provided with a gas-control valve (not shown) operated through a handle 24. One end of an elongated substantially hollow tubular and flexible gas-conducting conduit 26 is coupled at 28 to the cap 22, and the other end has fixed thereon an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical coupler indicated, in general, by reference numeral 30. The coupler 30 constitutes one element of a gas-fired heating device 32 constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention.

The coupler 30 comprises an enlarged substantially hollow cylindrical head 34 having an axially-elongated, substantially hollow tubular stem 36 projecting from one end thereof, the stem 36 being provided with an axial bore 38 which extends throughout its length. The stem 36 is formed, intermediate its ends, with a circumferential groove 40 (to which further reference will be made below), and is internally-threaded as at 42 adjacent one of its ends to receive an exernally-threaded cap insert 44 having an axial bore 46 in open communication with the bore 38 at one of its ends, and an extremely fine orifice 48 at its other end in open communication with the bore 46.

Fitted over the stem 36 is an axially-elongated, substantially hollow cylindrical nozzle 50 having a necked-down portion 52 intermediate the ends thereof. The neckeddown portion 52 includes a circumferential groove 54 which is intersected by a radial passage 56 in which is slidably mounted a substantially cylindrical detent 58. Reference numeral 60 denotes an annular resilient spring which is adapted to seat within the circumferential groove 54 and to engage against the outer end of the detent 58 which is slotted to releasably receive the same. As is seen in FIGURE 3 of the drawings, the circumferential groove 40 is disposed in confronting relation relative to the radial passage 56 whereby the detent 58 is releasably engaged within the groove 40 and is constantly biased for movement therein by the spring 60. This arrangement effects a detachable connection between the stem 36 and the nozzle 50,

The nozzle 50 is formed with a second necked-down portion 62 in which are formed a plurality of circumferentially-spaced air-admitting apertures 64, the latter being disposed in proximity to the outer end of the cap insert 44, but spaced inwardly therefrom.

The nozzle 50 is formed with a third necked-down portion 66 adjacent its outer end, the third necked-down portion 66 being externallythreaded as at 68 to thre'adedly receive a nut 70 thereon. The outer or terminal end of the nozzle 50 terminates in a fourth necked-down portion 72 which is externally-threaded as at 74 to serve a function to be described.

Reference numeral 76 indicates a substantially cylindrical disc having a centrally-located opening 78 extending transversely therethrough, and as is seen in FIGURE 3, the terminal end 72 of the nozzle 50 is received through the opening 78 in such a manner as the underside of the disc 76, as illustrated in this figure, engages against the upper side of the nut 70. Projecting upwardly from the upper side of the disc 76 is a circumferential, cylindrical flange 80.

Reference numeral 82 denotes, in general, an axiallyelongated, substantially hollow metallic cylindrical base having an integrally-formed, substantially semispherical lower end 84 apertured as at 86 adjacent its apex. As

is seen in FIGURE 3, the apertured end terminates in an outwardly-turned, substantially cylindrical lip 88 which is adapted to seat on the disc 76 and engage against the cylindrical flange 80. The semispherical end 84 is pro vided with a plurality of circumferentially-spaced, transversely-extending air openings 90.

A second substantially cylindrical disc is indicated by reference numeral 92, the disc 92 having integrally formed therewith a centrally-located, substantially hol low, internally-threaded hub 94. The hub 94 projects on opposite sides of the disc 92 and is threadedly engaged on the external threads 74 of the fourth necked-down portion 72 of the nozzle 50. As is seen in FIGURE 3, this end of the hub 94 fits snugly within the opening 78 formed in the cylindrical disc 76.

Reference numeral 96 designates a vertically-elongated screen having the lower end thereof fixedly secured to the periphery of the disc 92. The screen 96 projects upwardly from the disc 76 surrounding the upper end of the hub 94 in spaced relationship relative thereto and extends above the other or upper end of the cylindrical base 82. The lower end of the screen 96 is adapted to bear against the semispherical end 84 adjacent the lip 88 when the hub 94 is tightened upon the necked-down portion 72. The nut 70 is adapted to be tightened against the underside of the disc 76, whereby the lip 88 is clampingly secured against the upper side of the disc 76.

A substantially cylindrical screen disc 98 having a mesh finer than the screen 96 extends across the open upper end of the hub 94 and is formed with a downwardlyextending, substantially hollow cylindrical sidewall 100 at its circumferential marginal edge, the sidewall 100 engaging and being fixedly secured to the upper end of the hub 94. The lower end of a vertically-elongated, substantially hollow, cylindrical screen 102 is fixedly secured over the sidewall 100 and extends upwardly therefrom beyond the open upper end of the cylindrical base 82. The upper ends of the screens 96, 102 are coplanar, and the screen 102 is preferably of the same mesh as the screen 98. A substantially cylindrical cap 104 extends across the screens 96, 102 and is fixedly secured by conventional means to the screen 96.

Reference numeral 106 denotes an elongated, substantially hollow, oval-shaped air duct having an end thereof extending through a suitable opening formed in the semispherical end 84 of the cylindrical base 82 and in which the same is fixedly secured. The aforementioned end of the duct 106 extends through an opening 108 formed in the screen 96 and terminates in tangential engagement with the screen 102 intermediate the ends of the latter.

Reference numeral 110 indicates, in general, a substantially hollow cylindrical heat-conducting casing having an end wall 112 supported on the cap 104 and an integrally-connected cylindrical and depending sidewall 114 disposed in spaced relation relative to the screen 96. The lower end of the sidewall 114 is fixedly secured as by sweating to the upper end of the cylindrical base 82 at the inner side thereof.

Reference numeral 116 designates an axially-elongated, substantially hollow cylindrical housing having an open lower end which is fixedly secured, as by sweating, to the exterior side of the open upper end of the cylindrical base 82. The upper end of the housing 116 continues into a substantially semispherical upper end wall 118 which, adjacent the apex end thereof, is interrupted to form an upwardly-extending, substantially hollow cylindrical neck 120. Sweated, or otherwise fixedly secured in the neck 120 is one end 122 of an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical elbow 124, the other end of the elbow 124 being connected with a substantially hollow cylindrical coupler 126 threaded as at 128 (see FIGURE 2) to open into the water jacket 14 through the sidewall 15.

In operation, and assuming that it is desired to start the internal combustion engine 12 of the automotive vehicle under cold weather conditions, the operator will actuate the valve handle 24 to open the valve in the gasdischarge cap 22 to permit gas under pressure to escape from the container 18 and pass through the conduit 26 for admission to the stem 36. The gas passes through the bore 38 formed in the stem 36 and is forced through the bore 46 of the cap insert 44. From the cap insert 44 it is discharged at a relatively high velocity through the orifice 48 and draws with it a suflicient amount of air through the apertures 64 which mixes therewith in such amounts as to support the combustion thereof. The gas and air entrained therewith passes through the threaded end of the nozzle 50 and discharges against the screen 98 at which point the same is diffused and spreads upwardly through the hollow cylindrical screen 102. A match or other similar igniting means is now held against the outer end of the duct 106, and the flame thereof is drawn upwardly therethrough toward the screen 102, causing ignition of the gases thereon. The gases within the hollow cylindrical screen also become substantially simultaneously ignited therewith and burn with high intensity. The heat created by the ignited gases causes the space between the screen 102 and the screen 96 to become highly heated and by heat of radiation and conductivity, the screen 96 becomes highly heated. The products of the combustion are exhausted, of course, through the openings 90.

As the screens 96, 102 become heated, the cap 104 is similarly raised in temperature, and through heat of conduction, the end wall 112 and the sidewall 114 are raised in temperature.

The end wall 112 which makes line contact with the semispherical end wall 118 of the cylindrical housing 18 now heats the water (not shown) from the water jacket 14 in contact therewith, and through the heat of conductivity, the remaining water within the jacket 14 becomes heated, whereby lubricants used in connection with the pistons of the vehicle 10 and other lubricated elements associated with the engine or motor 12 are converted from a substantially solid state to a normal liquid or semi-liquid condition, thus, facilitating the starting of the engine.

When the water in the jacket 14 has been heated to the desired temperature, the valve handle 24 is actuated to close the valve in the cap 22, thereby cutting off the supply of gas to the conduit 26 to extinguish the flame at the orifice 48.

While the instant invention has been described in conjunction with an internal combustion engine for the purposes of heating the water contained in the water jacket thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that this invention finds utility in other fields wherein it is desired to quickly heat any fluid medium.

Having described and illustrated one embodiment of this invention in detail, it will be understood that the same is offered merely by way of example, and that this invention is to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A heating device for heating water in a water jacket comprising an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical base having opposed open and closed ends, a heat-conducting casing comprising an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical sidewall having an end thereof fixedly secured to the open end of said base and a closure wall extending across the other end of said sidewall, heat means disposed in said base and casing, an elongated substantially hollow housing having opposed open ends, means fixedly connecting one end of said housing with said open end of said base with said closure wall making line contact with said housing intermediate the ends of the latter, and means connecting the other end of said housing with said water jacket to receive water therefrom.

2. A heating device for heating the water in the water jacket of an internal combustion engine comprising an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical base having a substantially hollow semispherical end wall at one end thereof, said semispherical end wall having a plurality of circumferentially-spaced openings extending transversely therethrough, said semispherical end wall having an aperture at the apex thereof, a disc extending across said aperture and closing the same, means releasably secur ing said disc on said semispherical end wall, a heat-conducting casing comprising a substantially hollow cylindrical sidewall having an end wall at one end thereof and having an opposed open end, said open end of said casing sidewall being telescoped within and fixedly secured to the open end of said base with said end wall of said casing being spaced from said end wall of said base, an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical housing having an open end and a semispherical end wall at the other end thereof, said open end of said housing being telescoped over the open end of said base with said semispherical end wall of said housing making line contact with said end wall of said casing, means fixedly securing said open end of said housing to said open end of said base, means connecting said semispherical end of said housing to said water jacket to receive water therefrom, and means extending through said disc to introduce a combustible gas in the space confined by said base and said casing.

3. A heating device as defined in claim 2, and means extending through said base to effect ignition of said gas in said base and casing.

4. A heating device for heating the water in the water jacket of an internal combustion engine comprising an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical base having a substantially hollow semispherical end Wall at one end thereof provided with a plurality of circumferentiallyspaced openings, said base having an opposed open end, said semispherical end wall having an aperture at its apex and an outwardly-turned lip at the circumferential marginal edge of said aperture, a disc extending across said aperture and having a circumferential flange telescoped over said lip, said disc having an aperture formed therein aligned with said aperture formed in said sidewall of said base, a second disc disposed within said base and having a centrally-located substantially hollow hub integral therewith and having ends projecting beyond opposite sides thereof, one end of said hub being disposed within said aperture formed in said disc, a screen extending transversely across and being fixedly secured to the other end of said hub, a first elongated substantially hollow cylindrical screen having one of its ends connected on said other end of said hub, the other end of said first screen extending away from said hub and beyond the other end of said base, a second elongated substantially hollow cylindrical screen having an end thereof fixedly secured to the periphery of said second disc, said end of said second screen engaging against the semispherical end of said base adjacent said lip, the other end of said second screen projecting away from said second disc and extending beyond said other end of said base, said other ends of said screens being substantially coplanar, said first and second screens being concentrically spaced from one another, a casing comprising an elongated substantially hollow cylindrical sidewall having an end Wall at one end thereof and an opposed open end, said casing sidewall surrounding said second screen in spaced relation relative thereto and having its open end telescoped within and fixedly connected to the other end of said base, said end wall of said casing extending across and engaging the other ends of said first and second screens, an elongated cylindrical housing having a semispherical end wall and an opposed open end, means fixedly connecting said open end of said housing with said open end of said base with the end wall of said housing making line contact with the end wall of said casing, conduit means opening into the apex end of said semispherical end wall of said housing and opening into said water jacket, nozzle means extending through said aperture formed in said first disc and said base and projecting into said hub to conduct a combustible gas into the space confined by said base and casing, and means mounted on said nozzle operable to clamp said lip between said first and second discs.

5. A heating device as defined in claim 4, and a gasignition tube extending transversely through said base and said second screen and having its inner end in tangential engagement with said first screen.

6. A heating device as defined in claim 5, wherein said nozzle comprises an elongated substantially hollow tubular cylindrical element, said element having a plurality of circumferentially-spaced openings extending transversely therethrough intermediate its ends, an elongated hollow tubular stem disposed within said nozzle and having a closed inner end, an orifice extending transversely through said closed inner end, and said orifice being disposed adjacent said openings formed in said nozzle.

7. A heating device as defined in claim 6, and means detachably connecting said stem within said nozzle.

8. A heating device as defined in claim 7, wherein said closed inner end of said nozzle includes an elongated hollow tubular member inserted Within said inner end of said stem, said insert terminating in a cap at its outer end, and said orifice extending transversely through said cap.

9. A heating device as defined in claim 8, and means detachably connecting said insert in said stem.

10. A heating device as defined in claim 9, and a cap interposed between said other ends of said screens and the adjacent side of said end wall of said casing.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 470,530 3/1892 Wirz 122-234 907,590 12/1908 Gibson 126-350 1,014,968 1/1912 King 126-350 2,514,270 7/1950 Williams 126350 3,219,025 11/1965 Webster 15899 FREDERICK L. MATTESON, JR., Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US470530 *Oct 3, 1891Mar 8, 1892 Wilhelm wirz
US907590 *May 29, 1907Dec 22, 1908Anna L GibsonWater-heater.
US1014968 *Mar 14, 1910Jan 16, 1912Frederick R KingWashing-machine or the like.
US2514270 *Oct 3, 1947Jul 4, 1950Robert G WilliamsHeater for liquid cooling system of internal-combustion engines
US3219025 *Feb 25, 1964Nov 23, 1965Bernz O Matic CorpPortable gas heater
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3400700 *Dec 13, 1966Sep 10, 1968Phillips Mfg Company IncPropane heater for internal combustion engine
US3521704 *Jul 22, 1968Jul 28, 1970Andrew Morris AndersonHeat exchanger for recreational vehicle
US3901213 *Aug 2, 1974Aug 26, 1975Walbro CorpCatalytic heater control
US3911896 *Jul 31, 1974Oct 14, 1975Walbro CorpCatalytic heater
US4815426 *Feb 26, 1987Mar 28, 1989Henschel Paul SEngine heater, small, portable
US4862846 *Mar 22, 1988Sep 5, 1989J. EberspaecherCooling water heater for internal combustion engines
US4964797 *Aug 12, 1988Oct 23, 1990Hilton Chester WCatalytic heater for internal combustion engines
US5094611 *Sep 7, 1989Mar 10, 1992Atomic Energy Of Canada LimitedCatalyst structures and burners for heat producing devices
US5320089 *Dec 13, 1990Jun 14, 1994Braun AktiengesellschaftHeatable appliance for personal use
US5368475 *Mar 9, 1992Nov 29, 1994Atomic Energy Of Canada LimitedCatalyst structures and burners for heat producing devices
DE3709444A1 *Mar 23, 1987Oct 13, 1988Eberspaecher JVorrichtung zum externen zufuehren von waerme zum kuehlwasser eines verbrennungsmotors
Classifications
U.S. Classification122/4.00R, 431/329, 123/142.50R, 431/202
International ClassificationF02N19/10, F01P11/20
Cooperative ClassificationF02N19/10, F01P11/20
European ClassificationF01P11/20, F02N19/10