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Publication numberUS3278084 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1966
Filing dateAug 6, 1965
Priority dateAug 6, 1965
Publication numberUS 3278084 A, US 3278084A, US-A-3278084, US3278084 A, US3278084A
InventorsAlbert Neumeier
Original AssigneeOmark Industries Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Impact tool
US 3278084 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 11, 1966 A. NEUMEIER 3,278,084

IMPACT TOOL Filed Aug. 6, 1965 7 Sheets-Sheet l FIG.1

INVENTOR ALBERT NEUMEIER BUCKHORN, BLORE, KLARQUIST 8 SPARKMAN ATTORNEYS A. NEUMEIER Oct. 11, 1966 IMPACT TOOL '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 6, 1965 ma TH NM EU E NN T R E B L A BUCKHORN,BLORE, KLARQUIST 8 SPARMAN ATTORNEYS Oct. 11, 1966 A. NEUMEIER 3,278,084

IMPACT TOOL Filed Aug. 6, 1965 '7 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG. 6

INVENTOR ALBERT NEUMEIER BU CKHORN, BLORE, KLARQUIST BI SPARKMAN ATTORNEYS Oct. 11, 1966 A. NEUMEIER 3,278,084

IMPACT TOOL Filed Aug. 6, 1965 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 :1 1 AN m r 2 .N MUN i 255::

ATTORNEYS INVENTOR.

AL BERT NEUMEIER mm ME IN E m Ow mm N9 m3 mm: mi 5; m O

mmm mt:

BY BUCKHORN,BLORE,KLARQUIST SxSPARKMAN n In NH IHI A. NEUMEIER Oct. 11, 1966 IMPACT TOOL 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Aug. 6, 1965 INVENTOR.

ALBERT NEUMEIER BUCKHORN, BLORE, KLARQUIST 8 SPARKMAN ATTORNEYS A. NEUMEIER (Jet. 11, 1966 IMPACT TOOL I) \JN '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed Aug. 6, 1965 mmm hmm INVENTOR.

ALBERT NEUMEIER BUCK HORN, BLORE, KLARQUIST 8| SPARKMAN ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,278,084 IMPACT TOOL Albert Neumeier, Milwaulrie, Oreg., assignor to Omarl: Industries, Inc., Portland, Greg, a corporation of Oregon Filed Aug. 6, 1965, Ser. No. 477,866 Claims. (Cl. 22295) This is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 292,701, filed July 3, 1963, now Patent No. 3,213,607.

This invention relates to an impact tool and more particularly to a tool actuated by exposion of a fuel-air mixture driving a piston.

It has been found, in the use of impact tools of the type disclosed in United States Patent 2,898,893 in which a piston is moved from one end of a cylinder to an intermediate position to draw a supply of fuel and air into the cylinder, and the mixture thusly drawn into the cylinder is ignited to drive the piston on further, that improved operation of the tool occurs if the amount of fuel supplied to the cylinder is always a uniform amount, and the firing takes place at an exact time. The tool disclosed in the above-mentioned patent works well, but the operation thereof would be improved by supplying a measured quantity of fuel thereto for each explosion operating the tool.

An object of the invention is to provide an impact tool in which a precisely measured amount of fuel is introduced into the tool for each operation thereof.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved fuel supply for an impact tool.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a fuel supply cartridge for an impact tool.

The invention provides, in an impact tool, a fuel supplying device including a bladder containing a fuel having a predetermined vapor pressure when under a predetermined pressure and a predetermined temperature. A container surrounding the bladder has therein a fluid, normally a liquid under the above predetermined pressure and the above predetermined temperature and having a vapor pressure substantially higher than that of the fuel and substantially higher than that of the atmosphere so that, whenever an outlet valve to the bladder is opened, the fuel is forced out of the bladder. Preferably the container, when the bladder is empty, is quickly detachable from the impact tool for replacement by a similar container having a full bladder.

A complete understanding of the invention may be obtained from the following detailed description of an impact tool forming a specific embodiment thereof, when read in conjunction with the appended drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary, partially sectional view of an impact tool forming one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken generally along line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, partially sectional view taken generally along line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, partially sectional view generally similar to FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, partially sectional view similar to FIG. 3 with parts thereof shown in different positions from those in which they are shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary, partially sectional view taken generally along line 66 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a view generally similar to FIG. 5 but with the parts thereof in different positions from those in which the parts are shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to .FIG. 6 with the parts thereof shown in positions corresponding to those of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view similar to FIG. 8

3,278,084 Patented Oct. 11, 1966 ice and illustrating a manual cocking mechanism of the impact tool of FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken along line 10-10 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken along line 11-11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is an enlarged vertical sectional view showing a trigger mechanism and a magneto mechanism of the impact tool of FIG. 1;

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. 12 but with the parts thereof in different positions; and

FIG. 14 is a schematic view of an ignition system of the impact tool of FIG. 1.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, an impact tool forming one embodiment of the invention includes a rear casting (FIG. 1), a cast cylinder head 22 and a trigger housing 38 all secured together. An auxiliary piston or plunger 21 is movable from a retracted position in the cylinder head 22 for a cylinder 23 toward the right, as viewed in FIG. 1, by a compression spring 24 to move a main piston 25 from a normal position thereof adjacent the head 22 to an intermediate or firing position thereof spaced substantially from both ends of the cylinder 23. As the auxiliary piston 21 so moves, it moves against a compression spring 31 which is weaker than the compression spring 24 and draws air into the portion of the cylinder 23 therebehind through a port 32 (FIG. 2) covered by a resilient valve closing member 33 mounted on the cylinder head 22. Also, during this movement of the auxiliary piston 21, the piston 21, through means described below, moves a driving rod 35 (FIG. 3) to the right, as viewed in FIG. 3, first to the position thereof shown in FIG. 5 and then releases the driving rod 35, which is vmoved back to the position thereof shown in FIG. 7. The position of the driving rod shown in FIG. 7 is intermediate the positions thereof shown in FIGS. Band 5. The rod 35 controls the supply of a fuel under pressure to the interior of the cylinder 23. The rod 35 has a lateral driven arm or dog 41 rigid thereon and a second rigid driving arm or dog 42 projecting into a grooved collar 43 rigidly fixed to a tubular valve member 44.

The impact tool includes a piston rod 26 slidable in cylinder head 27 and in barrel 36 for driving a fastener or stud (not shown) positioned in the barrel 36 as is well known in the art. Cap screws 28 secure the heads 27 and 28 together. A cushion 30 at the end of a guide sleeve 29 in the cylinder head 27 acts as a bumper for the main piston 25. Cap screws 37 secure triggerhousing 38 to the cylinder head 22. The trigger housing has a handle 39, and carries a trigger 40. A spark plug 46 (FIGS. 2 and 14) provides ignition from a magneto ignition mechanism 47, and a trigger mechanism 48 (FIGS. 12 and 13) is provided.

The tubular valve member 44, as best shown. inFIG. 7, has an axial passage extending therethrough and the righthand end of the valve member 44 is guided by bushing 72 and is slidable in a bore 51 of a nozzle member 52 having a nozzle orifice 53. The nozzle member 52 is threaded into a tapped bore 54 in a headed, tubular insert 55 fixed in a complementary recess or passage 56 in the cylinder head 22. The tubular valve member 44 is also slidable in a bronze, flanged bushing 61 and a seal 62 of poly-tetrafiuoroethylene. The bushing 61 and the seal 62 are secured between generally tubular members 63 and 64 secured to the headed insert 55 in alignment therewith by capscrews 65. Capscrews 66 threaded into the cylinder head 22 secure the assembly of the threaded insert 55 and the members 63 and 64 rigidly in position in the counterbored recess or passage 56.

A compression spring 71 seats against a bronze flanged bushing 72 held by the nozzle member 52in a counterbored recess 73in the insert and at its other end engages the collar 43 to urge the tubular valve member 44 to the left, as viewed in FIG. 7. This urges a tapered or frusto-conical end portion 74 of the valve member 44 into sealing engagement with a nylon valve seat insert 75 having a complementary tapered valve seat 76. The insert 75 is seated in a socket 77 in a valve member 78. The valve member 78 is urged toward the right by a compression spring 83, as viewed in FIG. 7, toward seating engagement of a frusto-conical end portion 81 thereof with a poly-tetrafiuoroethylene valve insert 82. The spring 83 is substantially stronger than the compression spring 71, and normally holds the valve member 78 seated against the valve seat 79 of insert 82 against the action of the spring 71. During storage of the tool while uncooked, both of these valves are closed. A plug 84 threaded in a counterbore 85 in the tubular member 63 holds the valve seat 82 seated against the end of a counterbore 86 in the member 63 by means of a sleeve 87 fitting into the counterbore 86. The valve member 78 has a bore 91 therein which is Opened at the lefthand end thereof, as viewed in FIG. 7, and is closed at the righthand end, with a transverse passage 92 connecting the righthand end portion of the bore 91 to the outer periphery of the valve member 78. Fitting closely and slidably in the bore 91 is a cylindrical guide rod or post 93 integral with the plug 84, and this mounts the valve member 78 slidably along the longitudinal axis of the insert 55. When the tool is stored in an uncooked condition, both the valve members 44 and 78 are closed.

The plug 84 is provided with passages 94 therethrough, which connect a counterbore 95 in a connector bushing 96 of a cartridge or container 97 to the interior of the sleeve 87. The plug 84 has a cylindrical portion 101 projecting through a grooved bushing 102 fixed in and sealed to the open end portion of the counterbore 95 of the connector bushing 96. The bushing 102 carries an O-ring 103 which sealingly engages the cylindrical portion 101. Interiorly tapped nose portion 104 of the member 63 is adapted to receive the threaded bushing 96 and to engage a gasket 105 and press the gasket 105 against a flange 106 of the bushing 96 to seal the end of the bushing 96 in the member 63. The cylindrical portion 101 of the plug 84 has a socket 111 for receiving a springpressed valve member 112 of the cartridge 97, and moving the valve member 112 to a position opening a resilient, rubber bag or bladder 113 to the counterbore 95 and passages 94 in the plug 84. The valve member 112 has a head 114 and normally is urged to the right to close a valve passage in member 115 by a spring (not shown) in tube 116, but when the connector bushing 96 is threaded into the nose portion 104 of the member 63, the valve member 112 is held stationary while the member 115 is moved to the right to open the passage in the member 115. The tube 116 connects the member 115 to the interior of the bag 113. The bladder 113 is filled with a fuel having a high vapor pressure and under a pressure substantially greater than that of the atmosphere and sufficient to keep the fuel liquefied while in the bladder. The fuel is gaseous at atmospheric pressure and usual temperatures of the impact tool. The cartridge 97 also includes a cylindrical outer container 121 having a space 122 therein between the bag 113 and the interior walls of the container 121 filled with a pressure fluid which has a substantially higher vapor pressure than that of the fuel in the bladder, which maintains the fuel in the bag 113 under a substantial, constant pressure. The pressure fluid surrounding the bladder has a vapor pressure such that it is gaseous when under atmospheric or lower pressure at the temperatures of the container normally encountered in use of the impact tool. When full, the bladder contains suflicient fuel to liquefy substantially all the fluid surrounding the bladder. That is, the fluid surrounding the bladder is placed under a pressure suflicient to' cause it to be in liquid form. Since the fuel has a lower vapor pressure than the pressure fluid, the fuel will, of course, be maintained in liquid form in the bladder. As the fuel is metered, the pressure fluid vaporizes sufficiently to keep the fuel in the bladder at a constant pressure, suflicient pressure fluid being in the container relative to the minimum volume of the bladder that even \when the bladder is completely empty some of the pressure fluid is in the liquid state. Neck portion 123 of the bag 113 is sealed to a grooved stem portion 124 of bushing 96 by a band 125. The liquid fuel in the bladder may be dimethyl ether, and the higher vapor pressure fluid in the space 122 may be Freon 12 or Kerene 500, for example. During storage of the tools in an uncooked condition, the fuel is doubly sealed by the O-ring 103 and gasket 105.

The cartridge 97 (FIG. 7) includes the container 121 and the bladder 113. A collar portion 117 of the bushing 96 fits closely and slidably in bore 118 in the container, and a keying pin 119 welded and sealed to the container projects into keying slot in the bushing. An externally threaded nut 126 threaded into tapped counterbore 127 in the container presses the flange 106 against seaing gasket 128 to press the gasket 128 against internal flange or collar 129 of the container 121 to form a seal. A threaded end portion 130 of the connector bushing 96 may be screwed into tapped portion 134 of the nose portion 104 of the member 63 to sealingly connect the cartridge to the member 63, and the cartridge may be quickly detached from the member 63 for refilling of the bladder 113 with fuel or for replacement by an identical, full cartridge. A collar 135 of the tube 116 presses sealing gasket 136 against the bottom of counterbore 149 in the bushing 96 when threaded portion 137 of the tube 116 is threaded into a reduced, tapped end portion 138 of bore 139 in the bushing 96. The threaded portion 137 of the tube 116 extends into the counterbore 95 in the bushing 96 and is adapted to have a coupling threaded thereon to connect a supply of the fuel to the cartridge for refilling the cartridge with the fuel.

The greater vapor pressure of the pressure fluid in the space 122 surrounding the bladder 113 than that of the fuel in the bladder keeps the fuel in liquid form, and this pressure of the fuel moves the liquid fuel in the bladder through the passages 94 in the plug 84 into the space in the sleeve 87. Then, when the auxiliary piston 21 is in its retracted or cocked position, the valve member 78 is in the position shown in FIG. 3 in which the frustoconical portion 81 thereof is positioned out of engagement with the valve insert 82. The fuel flows, in liquid form, into a metering chamber 131 and fills the chamber 131. The metering chamber 131 is defined as the space between the seal 62 on the righthand side and the valve member 78 on the lefthand side and between the interior of a bore 132 in the member 63 and the exterior of the tubular valve member 44. Then, as the auxiliary piston 21 (FIG. 1) is triggered and released from its retracted position, the rod 35 is moved toward the right, as viewed in FIG. 3, to permit the spring 83 to move the valve member 78 into sealing engagement with the valve seat 82, at which time a predetermined volume of the liquid fuel under a predetermined pressure is enclosed within the chamber 131.

On further movement of the auxiliary piston 21 (FIG. 1), the rod 35 is moved farther to the right and moves the valve member 44 against the action of spring 71 to the right, as viewed in FIG. 3, to the position of the valve member 44 shown in FIG. 5, in which the lefthand end of the valve member 44 has moved away from the valve insert 74, and the fuel under the high vapor pressure in the chamber 131 flows out of the chamber 131 through the axial passage 45 in the valve member 44 and through the orifice 53 in he nozzle member 52 inc he inerior of he cylinder 23 (FIG. 1). Then before the air and the fuel in the cylinder 23 is ignited, the drive of the rod 35 from the auxiliary piston 21 is released and the spring 71 (FIG. 7) moves the valve member 44 back to its closed position shown in FIG. 7, in which the lefthand end of the valve member 44 sealingly engages the valve insert 75, after which the ignition of the air-fuel mixture takes place. Thus, the metering chamber 131 is closed off from the combustion chamber. Also, the orifice 53 is so small and the interior of the bore 51 and the passage are filled with the fuel, probably in the vapor form, and have no air therein so that combustion stops at the exit end of the orifice 53. The orifice 53 also is so small that the increased pressure occurring during the explosion of the fuel-air mixture and the duration of the explosion is so short that the pressure in the passage 45 is not inreased sufficiently to move the valve member 78 against the action of the spring 83.

The auxiliary piston 21 (FIG. 1) is slidable in a bore 141 in a bushing 142 positioned in a bore and threaded into a tapped bore 143 formed in the cylinder head 22, and is movable between a cocked or retracted position thereof, as illustrated in FIG. 9, through an intermediate position thereof, as shown in FIG. 6, to an extended position thereof shown in FIG. 8. When the auxiliary piston 21 is in the position thereof shown in FIG. 9, a flange 144 thereof engages a slotted lever 145 pivoted on pin 146 carried by a bushing 147 fixed in a laterally opening slot 148 in the cylinder head 22 and holds the lever 145 in a position engaging the collar 151 to hold the collar 151 and rod 152 against the action of compression spring 153 in extreme lefthand positions of the collar 151 and rod 152. A plug 154 threaded into a tapped counterbore 155 in the head 22 seats the lefthand end of the spring 153. The rod 152 carries a slide portion 161 having a slot 162 through which projects an arm 163 of a lever having a second arm 164 and mounted pivotally on a pin 165 carried by the side 161. A compression spring 166 seated in a socket 167 in the slide 161 and a notch 168 in the arm 163 urges the lever 160 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 9, to a position in which a rounded nose portion 171 of the arm 164 engages the arm 41, along with a fixed arm 172 integral with the slide 161, the nose portion 171 and the arm 172 bracketing the arm 41. The slide 161 has a bore 159 therein fitting slidably on guide rod 157 threaded into tapped counterbore 158.

The trigger mechanism 48 (FIGS. 10 to 13) includes the trigger 40 mounted pivotally on pin 181 and having a clevis 182 connected by a pin 183 to a link 184. The pin 181 is mounted in a fixed position on trigger side plate fixed in the trigger housing 38. A magneto driving lever 185 also is mounted pivotally on the pin 181 and has a socket 186 in one arm thereof in which is seated a compression spring 187 which also fits over spring seating pin 188 fixed to the trigger 40. The lever 185 carries a hook member 189 on the other end thereof and is adapted to be held in latched position by a latching lever 190 pivoted on a pin 191 fixed to the trigger side plate 174 and having a latching hook 192 adapted to hook over a laterally projecting lug 193. A tension spring 194 urges the lever 190' in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS. 12 and 13. When the trigger 40 is pivoted in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS. 12 and 13, to fire the tool, it moves the link 184 upwardly to the left, as guided by a cam slot 201 and a pin 202 fixed to the trigger side plate 175. The link 184 carries thereon a lever dog 203 pivoted on pin 204 and urged clockwise by a spring 205 (FIG. 12) toward a position in which the lower arm thereof abuts against the link 184. The dog 203 engages an arm 211 of a sear 212 pivoted on pin 213 fixed to the plate 175, and pivots the sear 212 against the action of a compression spring 214 to move a catch 215 out of latching engagement with the flange 144 of the auxiliary piston 21 to permit the auxiliary piston 21 to be driven by the spring 24 (FIG. 1) to the right in its work stroke from its retracted or cocked position.

The auxiliary piston in its work stroke moves the main piston 25 away from the cylinder head 22 to draw air 6 into the cylinder 23, actuates the tubular valve member 44, as described above, to supply a measured quantity of fuel to the interior of the cylinder through the orifice 53 (FIGS. 2 and 7), and then releases the valve member 44 to permit it to return to the position thereof shown in FIG. 7 prior to the end of this pre-ignition movement of the pistons 21 and 25 (FIG. 1). As the auxiliary piston 21 is released to make its work stroke by pivoting of the sear 212 (FIGS. 12 and 13), the flange 144 of the piston 21 moves into engagement with an arm 221 (FIG. 11) fixed to a plunger 222 by a collar 223 and pin 224 and moves the plunger 222 to the right, a viewed in FIG. 11, against the action of compression spring 225 mounted in bore 226 in the cylinder head 22. This moves a dog 227 to the position thereof shown in FIG. 11, the dog 227 being fixed to the rod 22 by pin 228. The dog 227 engages the latching lever 190 and moves itito a position releasing the magneto driving lever 185. The spring 187 having been compressed by movement of the trigger 40 swings the lever 185 clockwise, as viewed in FIGS. 12 and 13, and the lever 185 engages the end of high reluctance rod 231 mounted slidably in slot 232 of a core 229 of the magneto 47, and moves a low reluctance member 234 away from a core portion 235 of the magneto, the low reluctance member 234 being slidable in slot 233 in the core 229. A plate 249 is fixed to the core 229, and acts to stop the member 234 in its travel to the right. The movement of the low reluctance member 234 creates a gap 219 (FIG. 13) in the magnetic path and also has an end portion 236 which passes a grounded spring arm 237 to the right to break points 238 on the arm 237 and on plate 249 connected by the conductor 239 in series with a primary magneto winding forming part of coil 241. This produces a rapid collapse of the flux in the core of the magneto to induce a high voltage in a secondary magneto winding also forming a part of the coil 241. The electrodes of the sparkplug 46 (FIG. 14) are connected in series with such secondary winding so that a spark is produced between such electrodes to fire the fuel-air mixture in the cylinder. The magneto includes and is supported by high reluctance mounting plates 248. The magneto has a permanent magnet 242 and core portions 243 and 244 of low reluctance, the core 229' being mounted on members 245 and 2460f rubber or other insulation and fixed to the trigger housing 38 by screws (not shown), a high reluctance member 247 being positioned between the sheets 245 and 246. Capacitor 251 is connected across the breaker points to prevent burning of such points.

The explosion of the gas in the cylinder 23 (FIG. 1) drives the main piston 25 on to the right to drive the fastener in the barrel 36 into the object to which it is to be secured, and also re-c-ocks the auxiliary piston 21 by driving it to the left against the action of the spring 24. During the triggering action, end portion 261 of the dog 203 is moved away from the arm 211 to permit the sear 212 to return to the latching position thereof shown in FIG. 12, and as the piston 21 moves back to the cocked position, as shown in FIG. 12, it rides along an inclined. face 262, snap over the catch 215 and is secured in its cocked or retracted position, the spring 214 urging the sear 212 back into latching engagement with the flange144 of the piston 21. Then release by the operator of the trigger 40 permits the trigger to be returned to its normal position, as illustrated in FIG. 12, by spring 257. The trigger pulls link 184 back to the right, and the end of the link 184 engages the driving lever 185 and swings it clockwise to pull the rod 231 through the hook member 189 which projects into a notch 271 in the rod 231, back to the left to the position thereof shown in FIG. 12. This pulls the rod 231 back to the left. In this position, the low reluctance member 234 engages the core member 235 to again increase the flux in the core229, and the latching lever 190 again swings back under the lug 193 of the lever 185 to latch the lever 185 into position. Also, the dog 203 7 again swings uder the arm 211 of the sear 212 as illustrated in FIG. 12.

The above described apparatus gives a sure, uniform charge of fuel to the cylinder 23 for each firing thereof and directs the fuel in a wide spray through the arcuate orifice 53 away from the spark plug 46, as illustrated in FIG. 2, and toward the port 32 through which the air is being drawn into the cylinder by the piston. This causes the fuel and the air to mix thoroughly as the air is introduced into the cylinder 23, and forms an ideal, uniform combustion mixture for each actuation of the impact tool. The ignition mechanism (FIGS. l2, l3 and 14) provides a hot spark precisely timed in the cycle to surely ignite the fuel-air mixture on each operation. The cartridge 97 supplies liquid fuel under a constant pressure to the metering portion of the tool regardless of the extent to which the bladder is empty. The bladder may be readily refilled with fuel, and the cartridge when empty of fuel can be quickly detached from the tool for replacement by an identical cartridge having a fully supply of fuel.

It is to be understood that the above-described arrange ments are simply illustrative of the application of the principles of the invention. Numerous other arrangements may be readily devised by those skilled in the art which will embody the principles of the invention and fall within the spirit and scope thereof.

What is claimed is:

1. In a cartridge for an impact tool,

a container having an open end and an internal flange spaced inwardly from the open end,

a portion of the container between the open end and the flange being threaded internally,

a bushing fitting into and keyed to the internal flange of the container and having an external flange positioned between the internal flange and the open end of the container,

the bushing also having a nose portion extending along the portion of the container between the open end and the internal flange thereof,

a first gasket positioned between the internal flange and the external flange,

an internal nut threaded into the internally threaded portion of the container and spaced radially outwardly from the nose portion of the bushing and pressing the external flange to compress the first gasket,

the bushing having a portion extending beyond the internal flange into the container,

a bladder in the container having a necked outlet portion fitting on and sealed to said portion of the bushthe bushing having a bore and an inner counterbore,

a second gasket in the inner counterbore,

a valve tube extending through the bushing and having -a flange pressing the second gasket against the end of the inner counterbore,

valve means in the valve tube,

the bladder being adapted to be filled with a fuel in liquid form having a predetermined vapor pressure greater than that of the atmosphere,

and a pressure fluid in the container surrounding the bladder,

the pressure fluid having a vapor pressure greater than said predetermined vapor pressure and under a pressure such that a portion of the pressure fluid is in liquid form when the bladder is empty.

2. In a cartridge for an impact tool,

a container having an open end and an internal flange spaced inwardly from the open end,

a portion of the container between the open end and the flange being threaded internally,

a bushing fitting into and keyed to the internal flange of the container and having an external flange positioned between the internal flange and the open end of the container,

the bushing also having an externally threaded nose portion spaced inwardly from'and extending along the portion of the container between the open end and the internal flange thereof,

a first gasket positioned between the internal flange and the external flange,

an internal nut threaded into the internally threaded portion of the container and spaced radially outwardly from the nose portion of the bushing and pressing the external flange to compress the first gasket,

a second gasket positioned at the rear of the nose portion and against the external flange,

the bushing having a reduced, externally grooved portion extending beyond the internal flange into the container,

a bladder in the container having a necked outlet portion fitting on the grooved portion of the bushing,

a clamping band clamping the necked outlet portion of the bladder on the grooved portion of the bushing,

the bushing having a tapped intermediate bore, an

inner counterbore and an outer counterbore,

an O-ring seal mounted in the outer counterbore,

a third gasket in the inner counterbore,

a valve tube extending through the bushing and having a threaded portion threadedly engaging the tapped intermediate bore and also having a flange pressing the third gasket against the end of the inner counterbore,

valve means in the valve tube having an actuator extending from the outer end of the valve tube,

the bladder being adapted to be filled with a fuel in liquid form having a predetermined vapor pressure greater than that of the atmosphere,

and a pressure fluid in the container surrounding the bladder,

the pressure fluid having a vapor pressure greater than said predetermined vapor pressure and under a pressure such that a portion of the pressure fluid is in liquid form when the bladder is empty.

3. In a cartridge for an impact tool,

a container having an open end and an internal flange spaced inwardly from the open end,

a bushing fitting into and having an external flange positioned between the internal flange and the open end of the container,

the bushing also having a nose portion extending along the portion of the container between the open end and the internal flange thereof,

a first gasket positioned between the internal flange and the external flange,

means mounted in the container and spaced radially outwardly from the nose portion of the bushing and pressing the external flange to compress the first gasket,

the bushing having a portion extending beyond the internal flange into the container,

a bladder in the container having a necked outlet portion fitting on and sealed to said portion of the busha second gasket in the bushing,

a valve tube extending through the bushing and having a portion pressing the second gasket against the bushing,

valve means in the valve tube,

the bladder being adapted to be filled with a fuel in liquid form having a predetermined vapor pressure greater than that of the atmosphere,

and a pressure fluid in the container surrounding the bladder,

the pressure fluid having a vapor pressure greater than said predetermined vapor pressure and being under a pressure such that a portion of the pressure fluid is in liquid form when the bladder is empty.

4. In a cartridge for an impact tool,

a container having an open end portion,

a bushing fitting into the open end portion of the container,

the bushing also having an externally threaded nose portion spaced inwardly from and extending along the open end portion of the container,

a first gasket positioned between the bushing and the open end portion of the container,

means locking the bushing in the open end of the container in a position compressing the first gasket,

the bushing having a portion extending into the container,

a bladder in the container having a necked outlet portion fitting on the portion of the bushing extending into the container,

a clamping band clamping the necked outlet portion of the bladder on the bushing,

a second gasket in the bushing,

a valve tube extending through the bushing and pressing the second gasket against the bushing,

valve means in the valve tube having an actuator extending from the outer end of the valve tube,

the bladder being adapted to be filled with a fuel in liquid form having a predetermined vapor pressure greater than that of the atmosphere,

and a pressure fluid in the container surrounding the bladder,

the pressure fluid having a vapor pressure greater than said predetermined vapor pressure and being under a pressure such that a portion of the pressure fluid is in liquid form when the bladder is empty.

5. In a cartridge for an impact tool having a threaded connecting portion including a central projecting member,

a container having an opening, bushing means sealed in said opening and having a threaded portion adapted to threadedly engage said 3 threaded connecting portion,

means in the bushing for sealing the bushing to said projector member,

gasket means extending around and positioned towards the rear of the threaded portion of the bushing means and adapted to be sealingly engaged by the threaded connecting portion,

normally closed valve means carried by said bushing and having an actuator adapted to be engaged by said central projecting member to open said valve means,

a bladder connected to the inner end of the bushing and adapted to be filled with a fuel in liquid form having a predetermined vapor pressure greater than that of the atmosphere, and a pressure fluid in the container surrounding the bladder, the pressure fluid having a vapor pressure and being under a pressure such that a portion of the pressure fluid is in liquid form when the bladder is empty.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 24,918 1/1961 Mills ZZZ-386.5

1,054,728 3/1913 White et al. --26.1

2,671,578 3/1954 McBean 22 2386.5

2,898,893 8/1959 Rohr et al. 60-26.l

2,924,359 2/1960 Beremand 6039.48 2,979,897 4/1961 Studhalter et al. 60-39.48

3,089,624 5/1963 Micallef 222386.5

3,115,283 12/1963 Lindgren 222--394 3,213,607 10/1965 Neumeier 6026.1

5 MARK NEWMAN, Primary Examiner.

WENDELL E. BURNS, Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,278,084 October 11, 1966 Albert Neumeier It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1, line 13, for "exposion" read explosion column 4, line 22, for "seaing" read sealing lines 71 and 72, for "the orifice 53 in i yhe nozzle member 52 inc he inerior of he cylinder 23 (FIG. "1) Then before the air and the" read the orifice 53 in the nozzle member 52 into the interior of the cylinder 23 (FIG.1). Then before the air and the column 5, line 13, for "inreased" read increased line 34, for "side" read slide column 7, line 20, for "fully" read full Signed and sealed this 5th day of September 1967.

(SEAL) Attest:

ERNEST W. SWIDER EDWARD J. BRENNER Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/95, 222/394, 123/39, 60/39.461, 137/564.5, 60/39.48
International ClassificationB25C1/08, B25B27/00, B25C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25C1/08, B25B27/0085
European ClassificationB25B27/00K, B25C1/08