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Publication numberUS3278944 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 18, 1966
Filing dateAug 17, 1964
Priority dateAug 17, 1964
Publication numberUS 3278944 A, US 3278944A, US-A-3278944, US3278944 A, US3278944A
InventorsGowers Albert H
Original AssigneeGowers Albert H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for assisting in the teaching of golf
US 3278944 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 18, 1966- A- H. GOWERS MEANS FOR ASSISTING IN THE TEACHING 0F GOLF Filed Aug. 17, 1964 United States Patent 3,278,944 MEANS FOR ASSISTING IN THE TEACHING 0F GOLF Albert H. Gowers, 33 Holden Way, Upminster, England Filed Aug. 17, 1964, Ser. No. 389,953 1 Claim. (Cl. 2-159) This invention concerns a glove for use exclusively in the teaching of golf, wherein a golf club to strike a ball is held by the player. As is well known, in the game of golf the way in which a club is held by a player is of great importance. The club must be gripped correctly. The correct position for the left hand of a right-handed player, using either of the so-called Vardon interlocking or overlapping grips, is such that the knuckles of the index and second fingers should be visible to the player when he is addressing the ball. If only the index finger knuckle is visible, the left hand is positioned too far under the shaft, and the club face will tend to open (incline rearwardly) on the down swing, resulting in a slice, i.e., the ball will tend to curve to the right. Conversely, if the knuckle of the third finger or knuckles of the third and fourth fingers, as well as those of the index and second fingers can be seen, then the left hand is positioned too far over the shaft, and the club face will tend to shut (incline forwardly) and a hook will result, i.e. the ball will tend to curve to the left. Similar remarks apply to the right hand of a left-handed player, except that a sliced ball will curve to the left, and a hooked ball to the right.

In the case of a beginner, it is diflicult for an instructor to ensure that the fingers curl around and the hand position on the club is correct, and, moreover, in view of the relative position of the eyes to the hands, the player sometimes is unable to appreciate whether or not the grip is correct. It is therefore the object of the invention to provide a means whereby a player or teacher can observe whether or not the club is held correctly.

According to the present invention there is provided a hand glove for use exclusively in the teaching of golf and to be worn on that hand of the player which is uppermost on the golf club shaft when the player holds the club to address a golf ball, said glove comprising, a glove body having three contiguous strips each of a different and distinctive color secured to the back of the glove and extending logitudinally from above the wrist band to adjacent the knuckle area of the glove body, one strip being substantially in alignment with the index finger, another strip being substantially in alignment with the second finger, and the third remaining strip being substantially in alignment with the third and the little finger, whereby visual observation of the back of the glove body indicates the grip adopted by the player.

The glove is the left hand glove for a right-handed player, and the right hand glove for a left-handed player. Both gloves may have distinctive areas, but the essential is the glove for the upper hand holding the club shaft.

It will be seen that the areas can be located so that a player looking down at the ball can position the upper hand to expose to his view more or less of the areas. These are at locations such that only one or a selected number of areas are visible when the club is correctly held.

A convenient way of carrying the invention into eifect is to color code, and/or letter and number each strip. Conventional route-signal light coloring (green, amber, red) can be used, in which case the areas are so located that if the red area or only the amber area is visible to the player or the teacher, the hand in question is incorrectly positioned, the correct position being achieved when the "ice player or the teacher can see the green and amber area Without seeing the red area.

The areas may be applied by colored material such as paint, by patches or strips afiixed to the glove, or woven or knitted with the glove.

A glove constructed according to the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing showing the back of same fiat, the glove being the upper left hand glove for a right-handed player.

As shown, across the back of the glove are three strips, referenced R (red), A (amber) and G (green). The strips are secured by stitching, although they can be applied in any suitable way. The strip R extends from the little finger side of the glove to align with the little and third fingers; the middle strip A extends the width of the second finger, and the strip G the width of the index finger to the other side of the glove. The strips extend longitudinally from above the wrist hand up substantially to the knuckle line, and widen from the strip R to the strip G.

It will be appreciated that when the player grips his club shaft, and addresses the ball, he will see the back of his upper left hand. He can position same in relation to the grip adopted, so that the area G or areas G and A or G and a part of A are visible. The exact position correct for the individual can be selected by experience; for example, if the player is continually slicing then more of the area A can be brought into his vision.

It is generally accepted that what is known as the two knuckle left hand grip enables a player to swing the club down squarely on to the ball. When wearing a left hand glove as above set forth, areas G and A should normally be in view. If too little of the areas R, G, A, is visible, the head will open on impact with the ball, resulting in a slice; if too much, i.e., if R is visible, the head wll be closed, resulting in a hook.

If both gloves of a pair are constructed as described above, then the pair of gloves will be suitable for a lefthanded or right-handed player, but if it is desired todispense with the colored areas on one glove of a pair, or supply single gloves, then the upper left-handed glove will be so constructed in the case of a right-handed player, and the upper right-handed glove in the case of a left-handed player.

I claim:

A hand glove for use exclusively in the teaching of golf and to be worn on that hand of the player which is uppermost 0n the golf club shaft when the player holds the club to address a golf ball, said glove, comprising, a glove body including fingers and having three contiguous strips each of a different and distinctive color secured to the back of the glove and extending longitudinally from above the wrist band to adjacent the knuckle area of the glove body, one strip being substantially in alignment with the index finger, another strip being substantially in alignment with the second finger, and the third strip being substantially in alignment with the third and the little finger, whereby visual observation of the back of the glove body indicates the grip adopted by the player.

FOREIGN PATENTS 616,134 10/1957 Canada.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

G. V.- LARKIN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2092574 *Jan 16, 1936Sep 7, 1937Eddy Caroline ETraffic glove
CA616134A *Mar 14, 1961Pierre BoucherGlove
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3762719 *May 22, 1972Oct 2, 1973W SmithGolf swing training device
US3811684 *Jun 11, 1973May 21, 1974Tredway WGolf swing training glove including light projecting device
US3848874 *Oct 25, 1972Nov 19, 1974Elkins VGolf glove, system and method
US4100623 *Feb 10, 1977Jul 18, 1978Murray StrongwaterGenuine leather fabric and method for making same
US4277850 *Jun 27, 1979Jul 14, 1981Murray StrongwaterGlove and method for making same
US5152532 *Sep 16, 1991Oct 6, 1992Rouse Christopher DGolf stroke training attachment
US5158297 *Dec 17, 1990Oct 27, 1992Outdoor Technologies GroupGolf clubs with integral alignment indicia
US5230513 *Feb 10, 1992Jul 27, 1993Rouse Christopher DGolf stroke training attachment
US5234217 *Oct 16, 1992Aug 10, 1993Outdoor Technologies GroupGolf clubs with integral alignment indicia
US5644795 *Apr 8, 1996Jul 8, 1997Landis; GeorgeGolf glove
US5704065 *Mar 22, 1996Jan 6, 1998Bost Enterprises, Inc.Golf gloves with indicia
US6363535Nov 2, 2000Apr 2, 2002George LandisGolf glove
US6513166Dec 18, 2001Feb 4, 2003George LandisGolf glove
US20030068904 *Aug 28, 2002Apr 10, 2003Williams Terrick R.Electrician's gloves
US20100255921 *Oct 6, 2009Oct 7, 2010Joseph HoldridgeGolf grip training aid
USRE28661 *Jan 28, 1975Dec 23, 1975 olf swing training glove including light projecting device
WO1998054992A1 *Jun 3, 1997Dec 10, 1998Pascal VincentGolf glove with markers for perfect positioning of hands on the club
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/159, 473/205, D02/619
International ClassificationA63B71/08, A63B71/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B71/146
European ClassificationA63B71/14G6