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Publication numberUS3279999 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 18, 1966
Filing dateJul 2, 1964
Priority dateJul 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3279999 A, US 3279999A, US-A-3279999, US3279999 A, US3279999A
InventorsThomas S Harrison, Bruce J Cokeley
Original AssigneeLehn & Fink Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lipsticks
US 3279999 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 18, 1966 9T. s. HARRISON ET AL 3,279,999

LIPSTICKS Original Filed Dec. 13, 1961 INVENTORS. THOMAS S. HARRISON 5 BRUCE J. COKELEY BY United States Patent 3,279,999 LIPSTICKS Thomas S. Harrison, New Canaan, Conn., and Bruce .I. Cokeley, Huntington Station, N.Y., assignors to Lehn & Fink Products Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Continuation of application Ser. No. 159,112, Dec. 13, 1961. This application July 2, 1964, Ser. No. 382,683

11 Claims. (Cl. 167-85) The present invention relates to improvements in lipsticks, and particularly, to lipsticks which are selfshaping so that the applicator end of the lipstick remains, as the lip rouge is consumed, substantially unchanged in shape.

This is a continuation of application Serial No. 159,- 112, filed December 13, 1961, now abandoned.

Conventional lipsticks are made of plastic substances which soften when the lip rouge is brought into contact with the warmth of the body to which it is applied. Under the pressure used in applying the lip rouge, the lipstick is worn away and its shape is changed, usually becoming bluntly rounded. In its rounded shape it is more diflicult to use, particularly fortapering the applied lip rouge at the corners of the mouth.

It has long been recognized, for example, that the maintenance of the original shape of the tip of a lipstick throughout its use would be desirable to facilitate utilization thereof. Mechanical devices have been used to sharpen or reshape the tip of lipsticks. These devices have not gained acceptance, however, because they produce shavings that can cause damaging stains and, in addition, they tend to waste a large part of the stick of lip rouge. 1

In accordance with the present invention, the abovementioned disadvantages of prior lipsticks are overcome by providing a lipstick composed of lip rouge in which different portions thereof are removed unequally during use in such a way to cause the tip of the lipstick to retain its original shape. More particularly, the desired self-shaping property is obtained by combining in the lipstick at least two masses of lip rouge having different hardness characteristics at body temperature. While both masses are of a hardness characteristic of a good quality lip rouge, one mass, extending lengthwise of the lipstick, is somewhat softer than another mass coextensive with and lying adjacent to the first mass. When the stick is used, the harder mass will wear away at a slower rate than the softer mass, thereby maintaining a pointed tip, a sharply rounded tip or other original shapes in the stick throughout its use depending upon the distribution of the respective masses.

In molding the lipstick, the two masses, having different hardness characteristics, diffuse partially into each other to cause a gradation of the hardness across a section of the lipstick. In order to avoid complete mixing of the two masses of different hardness characteristics during the molding operation, the temperature of the molten masses must be kept only slightly above their solidification point.

The invention is more particularly described with reference to the various shapes of lipsticks shown in the accompanying figures of the drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective View of a fish fin lipstick, partially cut away and showing a cross-section thereof in Patented Oct. 18', 1966 "ice accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of a blunt ended lipstick, in accordance with another embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of an ogival lipstick partially cut away and showing a cross-section thereof, in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention; and

FIGURE 4 is a still further embodiment of the invention showing a perspective view of a beveled lipstick, partially cut away and showing a cross-section thereof.

The lipstick of FIG. 1 consists of an elongated somewhat flattened core 1, defined in cross-section by the dotted area, of a relatively hard (higher melting point) lip rouge substantially surrounded by a layer 2 or covering of relatively softer (lower melting point). lip rouge. The elongated core 1 has a cross-sectional area of about one-third the cross-sectional area of the lipstick. One end of the lipstick is formed into a fish fin or chisel edge 3. In use the outer covering 2 of the lipstick will wear away faster than the core 1 thereby maintaining its original fish fin or chisel edged shape. The hardness of the lipstick decreases from the center of the core 1 to the surface of the lipstick.

The embodiment of FIG. 2 comprises a substantially cylindrical core 6 of a relatively soft mass of lip rouge, surrounded by a substantially cylindrical outer layer 7 of a relatively hard mass of lip rouge. The hardness of the lipstick may decrease progressively depending upon the amount of diffusion between the respective masses from the surface of the lipstick to its center core 6. The softer core 6 of lip rouge is about two-thirds the diameter of the lipstick. The working end 8 of the lipstick is blunt. In use the greater wear resistance of the outer surface of the lipstick will cause it to retain substantially its original blunt shape.

In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the lipstick comprises a substantially cylindrical core 10 of a relatively hard lip rouge mass surrounded by a substantially tubular outer layer 11 of softer lip rouge to form a lipstick. The hardness of the lipstick decreases from the center of the core 16 to the outer surface of the lipstick. The diameter of the principal portion of the core 10 is about onethird the diameter of the lipstick. One end of the lipstick is formed in a standard rounded point as at 12. This shape will be maintained for the reason that the outer portion 10 of the stick wears away faster than the core 11.

FIG. 4 comprises a generally crescent shaped or semicylindrical layer 13 of a relatively hard lip rouge, extending lengthwise of the lipstick along one side thereof and united with a layer 14 of a relatively soft lip rouge extending along the other side of the lipstick. There is a variation of hardness from one side of the lipstick to the other, which may be selectively controlled during the molding of the lipstick. The hard layer 13 of the lip rouge extends about one-third the width of the lipstick. One end of the lipstick is formed into a conventional beveled end 15. In use the harder side of the lipstick at the end 15 wears away slower than the softer side to maintain the desired beveled configuration of the stick.

The melting points and hardness of the lipstick com- .ponents can be regulated by the use of suitable components in controlled proportions. Typical compositions for the harder and softer parts of the hpst1ck are as follows:

EXAMPLE Harder Mass Softer Mass Substance Percent Percent by Weight by Weight Castor Oil 50.00 56. 30 Oandelila Wax 6. S 7. 60 Ozokerite Wax. 6.70 1. 90 Yellow Beeswax 2. 80 3. 15 Carnauba Wax. 6. 40 1. O Lanolin 5.00 5. l0 Serbitan Sesquioleate 1. 70 1.90 Spermaceti 3. 40 3. 80 Monoglycerides of the fatty acids from Soybean Oil 2.00 2. 30 Butyl Stearate 1.35 1.90 Tetra Bromo FluoresceinD dz 0 Red N o. 21 or Di-Bromo FluoresceinD & C

2. 50 2. 50 1O. 10. 15 20 Perfume 1. 00 1. 00

The harder lipstick composition in the preceding example has an approximate melting point of 73 C. The softer component has a melting point of approximately 65 C. The difference in the melting points of the two lipstick com-positions enables them to be combined into composite lipsticks of the types described by a number of different manufacturing techniques.

For example, in making a lipstick of the type shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, a mold is partially filled with a molten mass of the lower melting or softer lip rouge, the solidified core is inserted endwise into the mold and the mold is then allowed to cool to freeze the molten material. During cooling, some of the core material will diffuse into the molten material thereby providing a gradation of the hardness of the lipstick from its center to its periphery.

Lipsticks of the kind disclosed in FIGS. 1 and 3, for example, can also be made 'by pouring the lower melting point lip rouge into a mold of a substantially cylindrical shape and having a core to form a tubular body of lower melting composition. When the tubular body is solidified the higher melting point material, in a molten state, is poured into the hollow body to form the core thereof. The molten higher melting lip rouge is at or slightly above its solidification point to enable it to unite with and partially diffuse into the outer layer of lip rouge.

Lipsticks of the kind shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, can be made by still another method. The higher melting lipstick composition can be formed into a solid core and is inserted in the center of a mold. The lower melting composition is melted and poured into the mold around the hardened core and allowed to harden or freeze. The temperature of the molten lower melting composition is regulated to enable the core material to melt slightly and diffuse partially into the outer layer.

Generally similar procedures are involved in making lipsticks of the type shown in FIG. 2. In one method, the higher melting composition is molded to form a solid shell with an axial opening therein. The opening is then filled with molten, lower melting lipstick composition.

A lipstick of the kind shown in FIG. 4 is made by forming, as by molding, a semi-cylindrical strip of the higher melting composition and inserting it into a cylindrical lipstick mold against one side thereof either before or after pouring the molten lower melting composition therein.

In each of the lipsticks described above the higher melting point composition is harder than the lip rouge having lower melting point. In order to assure the proper rates of wear of the harder and softer compositions during the use of the lipstick, their hardness (controlled by their differences in composition as reflected by the melting points) must be controlled closely. With compositions of the type disclosed in the example the difference in melting points is about 8 C. If the difference in melting points is much less than 8 C., it is difficult to keep the compositions from mixing completely, thereby producing lipsticks of essentially uniform hardness throughout. If the difference in melting points greatly exceeds 10 C., very great differences of rates of wear occur in the harder and softer zones of the lipstick so that the' softer portion wears away leaving the harder portion substantially unchanged.

It will be understood by those skilled in the art that the methods, articles and compositions disclosed above are susceptible of modification and variation without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and, accordingly, they should be considered as illustrative and not as limiting the scope of the depending claims.

We claim:

1. A lipstick comprising a stick of lip rouge having a plurality of substantially coextensive longitudinal sections of respective relatively hard and soft lip rouge extending lengthwise of said lipstick, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a crosssection thereof.

2. A lipstick comprising an elongated core of lip rouge and an outer layer of lip rouge around said core, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a cross-section thereof, the lip rouge of said core being relatively harder at body temperature than that of said outer layer of lip rouge.

3. A lipstick comprising an elongated inner core of lip rouge and an outer layer of lip rouge around said core, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a cross-section thereof, the lip rouge of said core being relatively softer at body temperature than that of said outer layer.

4. A lipstick comprising two masses of lip rouge of different hardness characteristics, said stick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a cross-section thereof, aid masses extending lengthwise of and forming a rod.

5. A lipstick comprising an elongated core of lip rouge and an outer layer of lip rouge around said core, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a cross-section thereof, the lip rouge of said core being relatively harder than that of said outer layer and having a diameter about one-third the combined diameter of the core and outer layer.

6. A lipstick comprising an elongated inner core of lip rouge and an outer layer of lip rouge around said core, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a cross-section thereof, the lip rouge of said core being relatively softer than that of said outer layer and having a diameter about two-thirds the combined diameter of the core and outer layer.

7. A lipstick comprising two masses of lip rouge of different hardness characteristics, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a crosssection thereof, said masses extending lengthwise of and forming a rod, said harder mass being slightly longer than said softer mass.

8. A lipstick comprising a stick of lip rouge having a plurality of substantially coextensive longitudinal sections of respective relatively hard and soft lip rouge extending lengthwise of said lipstick, said hard lip rouge having a melting point 8 C. to 10 C. higher than the soft lip rouge, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a cross-section thereof to assure uniform removal of the lip rouge masses from the applicator end of the lipstick during use.

9. A lipstick comprising a strip of border lip rouge extending lengthwise of said stick, and a portion of softer lip rouge longitudinally coextensive thereto, said strip of harder lip rouge having a melting point of about 8 C. to 10 C. higher than the softer lip rouge portion, said lipstick having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of its cross-section thereof to assure uniform 5 removal of they harder and softer lip rouge from the applicator end of the lipstick during use.

10. A pointed lipstick comprising two masses of lip rouge of different hardness characteristics, said masses extending lengthwise of said lipstick and forming a rod, one of the masses of lip rouge having a melting point of about 8 C. to 10 C. higher than the other mass of lip rouge, said pointed lipstick having a gradation of hard- :ness across at least a portion of its cross-Section thereof to assure uniform removal of the lip rouge masses from the applicator end of the pointed lipstick during use.

11. A process of preparing a lipstick comprising forming an elongated solidified member of a lip rouge composition, bringing the solidified member into contact with a molten lip rouge composition, said lip rouge having a melting point and hardness, when solidified, different than the melting point and hardness of the solidified member, cooling the molten composition to form a rod having lengthwise substantially coextensive zones of higher and lower melting points and different hardness characteristics, said rod having a gradation of hardness across at least a portion of a cross-section thereof.

No references cited.

LEWIS GOTTS, Primary Examiner.

SHEP K. ROSE, Assistant Examiner.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3947571 *May 6, 1974Mar 30, 1976Lanvin-Charles Of The Ritz, Inc.Lipstick containing microencapsulated oils
US3957969 *Jul 13, 1973May 18, 1976Shiseeido Co., Ltd.Cosmetic stick comprising water-in-oil emulsion
US4291018 *Feb 21, 1979Sep 22, 1981Kanebo Ltd.Lipstick of the core-sheath type
US4335103 *Mar 28, 1977Jun 15, 1982Almay, Inc.Multiphase cosmetic composition
US4393643 *Jul 29, 1982Jul 19, 1983The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for forming a barrier phase
US4602886 *Dec 28, 1983Jul 29, 1986Smit Adrianus JMulti-color marking implement
US4740097 *Nov 28, 1986Apr 26, 1988Elleance, LimitedCombined lip liner and lipstick mass
US4786449 *Apr 15, 1986Nov 22, 1988Clowny CorporationMethod for manufacture of multi-color marking implements
US5183349 *Nov 15, 1990Feb 2, 1993Revlon Consumer Products CorporationLipstick dispenser formed with lipstick formulation
US5593662 *Jul 12, 1994Jan 14, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyMoisturizing lipstick compositions
US6090396 *Dec 4, 1998Jul 18, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyMoisturizing lipstick compositions
US6764750 *May 14, 2003Jul 20, 2004Charles E. ClaycombMulti-layer surfboard wax system
US7967518Apr 10, 2006Jun 28, 2011Shiseido Co., Ltd.Stick-shaped solid cosmetics and method for producing the same
US8529919Jul 6, 2010Sep 10, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPersonal care product and manufacture thereof
US20120138078 *May 4, 2010Jun 7, 2012L'orealCosmetic assembly for making up and/or caring for keratin materials
WO1992009220A1 *Nov 29, 1990Jun 11, 1992Thomas WeckerleRefill for cosmetic pencils
WO2006109763A1 *Apr 10, 2006Oct 19, 2006Shiseido Co LtdStick solid cosmetic and process for producing the same
WO2007007292A2 *Jul 13, 2006Jan 18, 2007OrealCosmetic makeup and/or care product
WO2012005720A1 *Jul 6, 2010Jan 12, 2012Colgate-Palmolive CompanyPersonal care product and manufacture thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification424/49, 428/401, 428/400, 401/49, 424/DIG.500, 424/401, 264/271.1, 106/31.1, 428/375, 424/64, 428/364
International ClassificationA61K8/02, A45D40/16, A61Q1/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61Q1/06, A45D40/16, A61K8/02, Y10S424/05, A61K2800/88
European ClassificationA61K8/02, A61Q1/06, A45D40/16