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Publication numberUS3280870 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 25, 1966
Filing dateMar 30, 1964
Priority dateMar 30, 1964
Publication numberUS 3280870 A, US 3280870A, US-A-3280870, US3280870 A, US3280870A
InventorsWilliam C Bundy
Original AssigneeWilliam C Bundy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle
US 3280870 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 25, 1966 'w. c. BUNDY 3,280,870

RECEP'IACLE Filed March 30, 1964 INVENTOR. M703? @3400 Q9 United States Patent 3,280,870 RECEPTACLE William C. Bondy, 2908 Nebraska Ave., Playa Del Rey, Calif. Fiied Mar. 30, 1964, Ser. No. 355,726 11 Claims. (Cl. 150-42) This invention relates to a receptacle and is more particularly concerned with a unique unitary, flexible, podlike receptacle for small machine parts, pharmaceuticals, sporting goods, such as lures and the like.

Throughout industry there is a great need for receptacles or containers in which products can be advantageously placed for protection, easy access, inspection, shipping, storage and the like. The many diflerent kinds and/or types of manufactured articles that are produced present many special and unique packaging problems and requirements.

For instance, some articles are delicate or fragile and must be so packaged as to protect them against being damaged by shock or abrasion and the like, while others are such that they must be protected against contamination or damage from dust and/or moisture.

In determining packaging requirements and in addition to considering the particular nature of the article to be packaged, special consideration must also be given to the environmental conditions and the use to which the package will be subjected. In this regard, typical of the many factors which must be considered are: Will the package be subjected to extreme climatic conditions; will it be subjected to rough treatment or likely to find itself in dirty or contaminated environments; or will it be necessary to open and close the package repeatedly for the purpose of inspection and/or use of the article contained therein.

As a result of the above-mentioned requirements and factors which must be considered in selecting proper packaging means for particular articles, the packaging art has become extremely crowded and highly developed. The development in the art has, for the most part, been based upon the concept of the simple box-type container involving a substantially rigid receptacle or vessel with an access opening and a closure member for engagement in or over the access opening, and has manifested itself in the provision of special or unique methods of folding and forming the receptacles; special and unique closures related to the receptacles in unique manners and provided with special sealing and/ or locking means, and in the provision of special sealers, wrappers, partitions and the like for engagement in the box-type receptacles and to support and protect the articles arranged the-rein.

In accordance with common practice throughout the industry, special and unique packages, which are quite satisfactory, are provided in situations where the item mass-produced and the necessary cost of designing and manufacturing a special package is not prohibitive and is such that it can be readily absorbed in merchandising the item. A disadvantage in such specialized pack-aging resides in the lack of standardization with respect to the configuration and the mode of ope-ration of the packages.

Most frequently, a manufactured item does not warrant the expenditure that would be required to provide an especially designed and constructed package, and a simple standard, readily available pasteboard box of the closest suitable size, with suitable standard wrappings and/or st-uifings, is selected and employed to carry the item. Such practice leaves much to be desired and does not in many instances provide the protection for the item that is desired.

As industrial technology is advancing, there is an everincreasing number of small, exotic, extremely costly parts 3,280,870 Patented Oct. 25, 166

being produced, which parts must be carefully handled and pack-aged.

For example, consider a single small precision machine part made in limited quantity and which, during manufacture, storage, inspection, transport, and the like, must be protected from shock, dust, moisture and the like, and which must, from time to time, be manipulated or handled for the purpose of manufacture, inspection or use.

In accordance with present-day handling and pack-aging techniques, such parts, during manufacture, are han-' dled separately, are carefully arranged in trays or are wrapped in suitable cloths or papers as they are moved and stored between the various stages of their manufacture. Such a procedure is slow and time-consuming, is not dependable, and is generally a nuisance.

Upon completing manufacture of such parts, standard, folded pasteboard cartons, plastic boxes or the like, with suitable lids, which cartons or boxes are the smallest available standard size which will really receive the parts, are selected. The cartons or boxes thus selected, it is next necessary to select suitable wrappers and/or fillers to be engaged in the boxes and around the parts, which wrappers or fillers serve to support the article in boxes against shifting and against damage by shock. The wrappers or fillers being thus selected, the parts must be wrapped and then stuffed into the boxes. The boxes must then be closed and, finally, they must be sealed against moisture and/ or air. Such boxes or containers are normally sealed by wrapping them in suitable sheeting, such as wax paper, or by applying a suitable tape about all open seams.

When it is desired to use the parts thus packaged in the manner set forth above, the entire package must be broken or taken part. This requires the use of both hands, is destructive of the package material, and is timeconsuming. When it is desired to simply check or inspect the part within such a package, the package must be broken as set forth above, and a result, can seldom, if ever, be satisfactorily reused so as to maintain a dust and/ or moisture-proof package for the part.

It is apparent from the foregoing that the well-established and familiar packaging structure and procedure set forth above is costly, slow, and inconvenient.

The prior art has provided several unitary podor pouch-like receptacles for receiving and carrying coins, tobacco, and other similar items and materials. Such receptacles have characteristically involved flexible and/ or resilient shell-like bodies in which the items or material to be handled are arranged and the provision of slit-like openings in the bodies which are such that when the bodies are manually distorted or collapsed by the application or" pressure on axes parallel to the slits, the slits will open sufliciently to provide access to the interior of the receptacles and the goods therein. The principal difiicu-lty and short-coming of such structures resides in the fact that the bodies must be so distorted and collapsed to effect the desired opening of the access slits therein, that only yielding, granular or fluid parts and/0r materials can be advantageously handled. If such a receptacle is provided for a single rigid part or item, the receptable must be made considerably larger than the item so that the body thereof can be collapsed and distorted a sufficient extent to effectuate suflicient opening of the access slit to freely receive the part, Without so distorting and restricting the inside area of the body as would prevent reception of the part. Accordingly, such receptacles cannot be provided to cooperatively receive an item or part in such a manner as will properly hold and support the part or item against shifting and movement about and Within the receptacle.

An object of the present invention is to provide a unitary, pod-like receptacle molded of a flexible, shockabsorbing plastic and which serves to retain and protect an article of manufacture arranged therein, against damage by shock and the like.

A further object of this invention is to provide a receptacle having two relatively shiftable shell-like portions so related that the receptacle can be shifted from a closed position to an open position by the application of pressure at the opposite ends of an axis through the structure, and such that the shell-like portions of the structure in which the article is arranged do not collapse nor distort when the structure is operated.

It is an object of my invention to provide a receptacle of the character referred to having two relatively shiftable portions or sections selectively shiftable to three positions, that is, a closed position, a half-opened or intermediate position, and a fully opened position.

Another object of this invention is to provide a parts receptacle which is formed of material which is compatible with the material from which the article of manu facture to be protected is made, a receptacle which is reusable and which is not subject to destruction or deterioration as the result of opening, closing and normal handling and use.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a receptacle of the general character referred to which is easy, fast, positive and convenient to use.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a receptacle or package of the general character referred to which can be advantageously established of transparent, clear or tinted material whereby the article arranged therein can be insepcted and viewed without opening the receptacle; whereby the receptacle and/or article can be color-coded and wherebya label can be advantageously arranged within the receptacle where it is protected and yet can be easily and conveniently read.

A further object of this invention is to provide a receptacle of the character referred to which is such that it can be established of opaque material when desired or when circumstances require.

An object of this invention is to provide a receptacle of the character referred to which is easy and convenient to clean and maintains, a receptacle which is easy and economical to manufacture in short runs or in mass production, as circumstances require; and a receptacle which can be advantageously produced and made readily available in a multitude of sizes and shapes, as circumstances require. 7

Another object of my invention is to provide a receptacle of the general character referred to which is neat and compact, and which is so functional in appearance that the ordinary person viewing the receptacle will have no difficulty in comprehending its purpose and its role of action.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a container or receptacle of the .general character refer-red to having dust, moisture and/or airproof sealing means that can be made and broken as desired or as circumstances require.

It is another object of my invention to provide a parts receptacle of the general character referred to which is rugged and durable and is such that it lends itself to many easy and simple modifications for handling special parts.

It is a general object of my invention to provide a novel receptacle or container of the [general character referred to above which is particularly adapted or suitable as a standard receptacle construction for Army- Navy and Military standard fittings, as a sanitary container or receptacle for special pharmaceuticals such as pills and the like, as a machine parts recepacle or as a receptacle for special tools, such as go and No -go gauges, and the like.

The various objects and features of my invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of typical preferred forms and applications of my invention, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is an isometric view of my new container showing it in its closed position;

FIGURE 2 is an isometric view of my container showing it in its open position;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 33 on FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 4-4 on FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 5-5 on FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view similar to FIGURE 5 and showing the construction in a different position.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged detailed sectional View of my new sealing means;

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to FIGURE 1 and showing another form of my invention;

FIGURE 9 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 99 on FIGURE 8;

FIGURE 10 is an isometric view of the construction shown in FIGURE 8, showing it in a fully-opened position.

The receptacle A provided by the present invention is a unitary molded plastic structure and includes an elongate body B with cylindrical side walls 10 and flat end Walls 11. The body B is split longitudinally, defining two, similar, shell-like half-sections X and Y, each having flat, straight top, bottom and end edges 12, 13 and 14, respectively.

The sections X and Y are arranged with their bottom edges 13 adjacent to each other and are integrally joined to each other by means of thin, flexible, laterally-outwardly projecting, longitudinal flanges 15 on the sections, at or adjacent the edges 13 thereof. The flanges 15 are arranged in side-by-side relationship and are fused together, as indicated at 16, by suitable sheet-sealing operation. The flanges 15 cooperate to establish a flexible hinge means H.

The fuse or bond lines 16 may be spaced a predetermined distance from the edges 13 of the sections X and Y to impart the desired or necessary flexibility to the said hinge means.

The hinge means H is coextensive with the body and establishes a positive seal along and between the bottom edges 13.

Due to the inherent resiliency or flexibility of the plastic material establishing the flanges 15 and the relationship of the flanges to each other and to the sections X and Y, the hinge means normally yieldingly urges the construction closed, and is such that the flanges, which make up the hinge means, are yieldingly flexed when the construction is opened.

In practice, and as illustrated in the form of the invention shown in FIGURES 8 through 10 of the drawings, the sections X and Y are integrally joined together along their bottom edges 13', when molded, by a single flange or web 15, which flange or web establishes the hinge means H. In this form of the invention the receptacle is established in a wide or fully-opened position, that is, the sections X and Y are established with the several edges thereof in a common plane and the hinge means H is yieldingly flexed when the sections are urged to their closed position and where the said edges thereof are in opposed relationship.

The end edges 14 of the sections X and Y are provided with longitudinally-outwardly-projecting, wing or wedgeshaped flanges 17 having flat inner and outer surfaces 13 and 19, longitudinally-upwardly and outwardly-inclined outer edges 20, and upper or top edges which join with other forces of the construction, as will hereinafter be described.

The inner surface 18 of each flange 17 normally occurs in a common plane with the several edges of its related section X or Y and establishes flat-bearing engage ment with the inner surface of its related, adjacent flange 17, as clearly illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 3 of the drawings.

The related flanges 17 are fused or bonded together, as by a suitable heat or electronic-sealing operation, along their upwardly and longitudinally-outwardly-inclined edges 20, as indicated by the numeral 21.

The line of joinder between the flanges 17 and their related end walls 11 of the body sections X and Y are, by virtue of the flexible nature of the material from which the receptacle is made, natural break lines and establish flexible hinge-like lines of joinder.

In practice, if the receptacle has suflicient wall thickness and is so stiff as to make it necessary or desirable, the walls of the receptacle can be grooved or scored along the lines of joinder between the flanges 17 and the respective end walls 11, as indicated at 22 in the form of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 8 through 10 of the drawings. Such a score line or groove imparts added desired flexibility.

It is to be noted that the flanges and 17 projecting from the sections X and Y are integrally joined to establish a continuous, uninterrupted flange about the bottom and ends of the sections X and Y, and that the edges 20 converge with the ends of the bottom edges of the flanges 15.

The wing-like or wedge-shaped flanges 17 serve to bridge and extend between the adjacent or opposing end edges 14 of the sections X and Y when the receptacle is urged from its closed position to its open position and when the said flanges are flexed or turned to occur in substantial common or parallel planes with the end wall 11, as clearly illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 4 of the drawings.

In the case illustrated, the edges and bond lines are disposed at approximately 30 degrees relative to the central longitudinal axis of the construction. At this angle, when the receptacle is urged open, the distance between the upper edges 12 of the sections X and Y is substantially equal to the inside diametric extent of the receptacle (when closed), thereby providing substantially full and free access to the interior of the construction.

By increasing or decreasing the angle of the edges 20, the extent to which the receptacle will open, can be released or decreased as circumstances require or as desired.

The upper or top edges 12 of the sections X and Y are provided with upwardly-projecting longitudinal top flanges 36, having fiat opposing inner surfaces 31, in common planes with said edges. The flanges 30 are coextensive with the sections X and Y and continue longitudi nally outwardly beyond the end walls 11 of the sections and along the upper edges of the flanges 17, with which they are integrally joined.

The flanges 3d are provided with releasable holding and sealing means S, which means is shown as including a pair of vertically-spaced parallel upper and lower beads 32 and 33 on the inner surface 31 of one of said flanges, and a pair of vertically-spaced parallel upper and lower bead-receiving grooves, 34 and 35, in the other or related flange 3t), opening at the inner surface 31 thereof and adapted to cooperatively receive the beads 32 and 33.

The beads and grooves extend longitudinally of the flanges 30 and terminate short of the end thereof and adjacent the bond line 21, which bond line continues upwardly from the edge portion 20 of the flanges 17 through the adjacent end portions of the flanges 30, as clearly illustrated in the drawings.

In practice, the bond lines 21 and the end of the beads and grooves of the means S converge so that the terminal ends of said beads and grooves are effectively fused and sealed together.

In practice, if necessary the walls of the flanges 30 can be enlarged to accommodate the sealing means S,

6 as clearly illustrated in the form of the invention shown in FIGURES 1 through 7 of the drawings.

The upper bead 32 of the means S projects inwardly from the inner surface 31 of its related flange 30 and has a flat, horizontally-disposed top surface 36, a flat, upwardlyand inwardly-inclined bottom surface 37, a downwardly-projecting, rounded, longitudinally-extending enlargement 38 at the inner edge of the bottom surface and a flat, inner surface 39. The upper and lower edges of the inner surface 33 are chamfered, as indicated at 40, which chamfers facilitate entry of the head into its related groove.

The lower bead 33 of the means S is similar to the upper bead 32, but the several parts and/or surfaces are turned upside down. That is, the surface 36 is at the bottom and the surface 37 and the enlargement 38' are at the top.

The surfaces 37 and 37' of the pair of beads cooperate to define a longitudinal recess R. The enlarge- Inents 38 and 38 on the beads cooperate to restrict the opening to the recess R.

The upper groove 34 of the means S opens inwardly and has or defines a rounded or radiused outer wall 41, and inwardly and upwardly-inclined top wall 42 continuing tangently from the outer wall 41 and a rounded or radiused bottom wall 43 which establishes an upwardly-projecting enlargement along the lower inner edge of the groove, adjacent the open side thereof. The lower groove 35 is similar to the upper groove 34, except that the several walls are turned upside-down. That is, the wall 42 is at the bottom and the wall 43' is at the top.

The pair of grooves 34 and 35 are of such cross-sectional configuration and area a to cooperatively receive the beads 32 and 33.

The bottom and top walls 43 and 43' of the grooves 34 and 35 cooperate to define an elongate bulbous enlargement E which is adapted to be cooperatively engaged in the recess R defined by the beads 32 and 33. The lower portion of the rounded outer wall 41 of the upper groove 34 and the upper portion of the outer wall 41' of the lower groove 35 cooperate with their related walls 43 and 43' to define longitudinal depressions in the grooves to accommodate and cooperatively receive the enlargements 38 and 38 on the beads 32 and 33.

The top and bottom surfaces 36 and 36 of the beads 32 and 33 are in a common plane with the inner edges of the inclined top and bottom surfaces 42 and 42' of the grooves 34 and 35'. As a result of this relationship of parts, it will be apparent that when the beads are urged into engagement in the grooves, the beads are flexed toward each other. As the beads are advanced into engagement in the grooves, the bulbous enlargement E, established by the grooves, is urged by the enlargements 38 and 38' on the beads, and vice versa. When the beads are fully engaged in the grooves, the enlargement E occurs in the recess R and the enlargements 38 on the beads engage and grip the outer side of the enlargement E to hold the parts assembled.

Further, when the means S is fully engaged, as set forth above, the flat surfaces 36 and 36' of the beads establish flat bearing and sealing engagement on and with the opposing flat, inclined surfaces in the grooves.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that when the means S is made up or connected, there is a yielding and flexing of material and that the several parts are interlocked in yielding pressure-sealing engagement with each other.

It will be further apparent that the ends of the means S, adjacent the bond lines 21, are maintained in engagement at all times and will or cannot be disengaged. As a result of the above, the means S is always partially engaged and therefore can be completely engaged by simply engaging the flanges 30, at one end thereof, between one finger, applying light pressure onto and through the flanges and then drawing the flanges longitudinally between the fingers.

It will also be apparent that the means S can be easily and conveniently broken or opened by the exertion of axially, inwardly and upwardly-directed forces at the opposite ends of the flanges 30, which forces tend to distort and bow the flanges 30 upwardly and in such a manner as to draw the bead from engagement in the grooves, at the central portion of the construction, and thereby permit the flanges 30 to Shift laterally away from each other.

In practice, the forces employed to open or release the sealings S are applied to the outer edges 20 of the flanges 17. It will be apparent that as a result of the longitudinal outwardly and downwardly-disposed relationship of the edges 20, pressure or forces applied thereto from the opposite ends of the construction are resolved or directed longitudinally, inwardly and upwardly through the construction toward the central portion of the flanges and the means S, thereby assuring proper breaking or releasing of the means S and resulting separation of the flanges 30.

Upon the exertion of further pressure upon an axial inward movement or shifting of the wing-like flanges 17, the flanges 17 swing laterally outwardly into the position illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 4 of the drawings. This outward swinging of the flanges 17 causes the sections X and Y to swing open relative to the hinge mean-s H. The flanges 30, with the means S, extending longitudinally at the top edges of the sections X and Y and along the top edges of the flanges 17 related thereto, are moved or shifted therewith and the construction is effectively opened, as clearly illustrated in FIGURE 2 of the drawings.

It is to be noted that the break or bend line between the flanges 17 and end Walls 11 of the sections X and Y extend or continue upwardly through the flanges 30 and the means S.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that I have invented a novel, highly effective and dependable unitary plastic container or receptacle, which is such that it can be yieldingly shifted to an open position by the mere application of pressure at its opposite ends. It will be further apparent that the chamber defined by the receptacle is not collapsed or otherwise deformed or distorted when the construction is opened and that any desired amount of access to the interior of the construction can be provided.

It is also apparent that the receptacle tends to remain in its closed posit-ion and that easy-to-operate, effective and dependable sealing means is provided to seal the construction when in its closed position.

In the form of the invention illustrated in FIGURES 8 through 10 of the drawings, the sealing means S is provided with extensions S which extend downwardly from the ends of the flanges 30 along the edge portions of the wing-like flanges 17 and replace the bond lines 21, provided in the first form of the invention.

In this latter form of the invention, the receptacle functions in the same manner as the first form of the invention, when shifted from its closed position to an intermediate or partially-opened position, similar to the position illustrated in FIGURE 2 of the drawings. After the construction now under consideration is shifted to a position such as is shown in FIGURE 2 of the drawings, the operator can engage the flanges 30' and strip the beads from the grooves in the extended portions S of the means S, extending along the edge portions 20 of the flanges 17. When the extensions S of the means S are thus stripped, the sections X and Y of the construction can be laid wide open. I I

When in this wide-open position, the sections X and Y can serve as tray-like receivers for the item being handled. Further, in this latter form of the invention, the receptacle can be more easily and conveniently cleaned, stacked and handled, preparatory to its being used.

It is to be noted that the extensions 8' of the means 9: S extend along lines at acute angles to the primary portion of the said sealing means and that the forces exerted onto and through the flanges 17, to initiate opening the construction, are at right angles to the extensions S and do not readily tend to :break or release the seal established thereby. Accordingly, when the construction is acted upon to open the container, the primary sealing means S along the flanges 30 is initially released and the extensions S along the edges 20 of the flanges 17 do not release until the primary portion is fully released and the sections X and Y are further manually separated.

In practice, score or relief lines 50 can be provided in the flanges 17 along the adjacent inner sides of the extensions S of the sealing means, which lines allow for free flexing of the flanges 17, adjacent the means S and prevent accidental separation of that means when the construction is opened to its intermediate position.

In practice, and as illustrated in FIGURES 8 and 10 of the drawings, the sections X and Y can be of any desired configuration and can be provided with portions such as is indicated at 51 to nest with a portion of the item or part to be handled and/or can be provided with projections 52 and/or ribs 53 to support the item or part and to act as buffers against shock and the like.

In essence and upon viewing the construction from a different standpoint, the invention relates to a novel unitary molded plastic receptacle frame made of the several flanges 13, 17 and 30 and the means S, which frame is adapted to carry and support, within its confines, shell-like item-receiving sections X and Y, which sections are formed integrally with the frame.

In the preferred carrying out of this invention, the receptacle is established of poly-vinyl chloride, by injection molding. This material is particularly adaptable for establishing my new container as it can be provided in any color and of any desired clarity; its hardness and flexibility can be varied as circumstances require or as desired; it has excellent shock-absorbing characteristics, it is extremely stable, and is compatible with a wide range of materials.

While polyvinyl chloride is particularly adapted for use in establishing my new receptacle, it is to be understood that any other similar suitable material can be employed.

Having described only typical preferred forms and applications of my invention, I do not wish to be limited to the particular detail herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any modifications and variations that may appear to those skilled in the art, and which fall within the scope of the following claims:

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. An elongate receptacle of the character referred to formed of flexible material including, a unitary frame having a pair of flat elongate longitudinally extending bottom flanges with upper and lower edges arranged in a vertical plane in side-by-side relationship and bonded together throughout their longitudinal extent, wing-like end flanges at each end of each bottom flange, joined integrally therewith and projecting upwardly therefrom, said end flanges having vertically disposed inner edges and upwardly longitudinally outwardly inclined outer edges, the adjacent end flanges at each end of the bottom flanges being bonded together adjacent and longitudinally of their outer edges, a pair of elongate, flat longitudinally extending top flanges with top and bottom edges arranged in side-by-side relationship and joined integrally with and extending between the upper portions of the end flanges, the top, inner and bottom edges of the integrally joined bottom, end and top flanges defining a pair of adjacent, laterally outwardly disposed openings, and opposing, laterally inwardly opening shells joined integrally with the said top inner and bottom edges of the related flanges to overlie the openings defined thereby and cooperating to define a receiver chamber.

2. An elongate receptacle of the character referred to formed of flexible material including, a unitary frame having a pair of flat elongate longitudinally extending bottom flanges with upper and lower edges arranged in a vertical plane in side-by-side relationship and bonded together throughout their longitudinal extent, wing-like end flanges at each end of each bottom flange, joined integrally therewith and projecting upwardly therefrom said end flanges having vertically disposed inner edges and upwardly longitudinally outwardly inclined outer edges, the adjacent end flanges at each end of the bottom flanges being bonded together adjacent and longitudinally of their outer edges, 2. pair of elongate, flat longitudinally extending top flanges with top and bottom edges arranged in side-by-side relationship coextensive and joined integrally with the upper edges of the end flanges, and extending between the end flanges, the top, inner and bottom edges of the integrally joined bottom, end and top flanges defining a pair of adjacent, laterally outwardly disposed openings, and opposing, laterally inwardly opening shells joined integrally with the said top inner and bottom edges of the related flanges to overlie the openings defined thereby and cooperating to define a receiver chamber.

3. The structure as set forth in claim 1, having sealing and locking means between the top flanges, said means including a pair of vertically spaced beads projecting inwardly from one of said top flanges, and extending longitudinally thereof, and a pair of vertically spaced laterally inwardly opening, longitudinally extending grooves in the other top flange to releasably receive the beads.

4. The structure as set forth in claim 2, having sealing and locking means between the top flanges, said means including a pair of vertically spaced beads projecting inwardly from one of said top flanges, and extending longitudinaly thereof, and a pair of vertically spaced laterally inwardly opening, longitiudinally extending grooves in the other top flange to releasably receive the beads.

5. A structure as set forth in claim 1, having sealing and locking means at the top flanges, said means including upper and lower laterally inwardly projecting longitudinal beads on one of said top flanges, and upper and lower longitudinal laterally inwardly opening bead-receiving grooves entering the other top flange, and adapted to releasably receive the beads, said upper and lower beads having laterally inwardly convergent opposite disposed top and bottom surfaces respectively and horizontally disposed, opposing and bottom surfaces, respectively, said opposing surfaces having enlargements along their inner edge portions, said upper and lower grooves having upper and lower surfaces respectively, which surfaces are laterally inwardly divergent relative to each other, and established sliding wedging engagement with the laterally inwardly convergent surfaces of the upper and lower beads, said upper and lower grooves having horizontal, oppositely disposed upper and lower surfaces, respectively, with enlargements along the outer edge portions thereof, the portions of the flange between the pair of grooves being adapted to enter the space between the pair of beads so that the enlargements on the beads and in the grooves establish locked sealing engagement with each other when the beads are urged into tight, wedging engagement in the grooves.

6. A structure as set forth in claim 2, having sealing and locking means at the top flanges, said means including upper and lower laterally inwardly projecting longitudinal beads on one of said top flanges, and upper and lower longitudinal laterally inwardly opening bead-receiving grooves entering the other top flange, and adapted to releasably receive the beads, said upper and lower beads having laterally inwardly convergent oppositely disposed top and bottom surfaces respectively and horizontally disposed, opposing and bottom surfaces, respectively, said opposing surfaces having enlargements along their inner edge portions, said upper and lower grooves having upper and lower surfaces respectively, which surfaces are laterally inwardly divergent relative to each other, and established sliding wedging engagement with the laterally inwardly convergent surfaces of the upper and lower beads, said upper and lower grooves having horizontal, oppositely disposed upper and lower surfaces respectively with engagements along the outer edge portions thereof, the portions of the flange between the pair of grooves being adapted to enter the space between the pair of beads so that the enlargements on the beads and in the grooves establish locked sealing engagement with each other when the beads are urged into tight, wedging engagement in the grooves.

7. A structure as set forth in claim 1, wherein grooves are provided in the end flanges along the inner edges and along the outer edges longitudinally inward of the lines of joinder of adjacent end flanges, whereby the flanges will readily bend along said grooves when the upper flanges are shifted laterally outwardly in opposite directions.

8. An elongate unitary receptacle of the character referred to formed of flexible material including, a pair of elongate, vertically disposed frame portions arranged in side-by-side relationship and shell portions carried by the frame portions and defining the work receiving chamber, said frame portions have straight horizontally disposed, longitudinal bottom flanges with flat, opposing inner surfaces and top and bottom edges, end flanges joined integrally to the ends of the bottom flanges to project upwardly therefrom and having flat opposing inner surfaces, vertical longitudinally inwardly disposed inner edges and longitudinal outwardly and downwardly disposed inclined outer edges, and straight horizontally disposed top flanges with flat opposing inner surfaces and top and bottom edges coextensive with the longitudinal extent of the receptacle and joined integrally with the upper edge portions of the end flanges, said shell portions being formed to receive a portion of the work to be received and joined integrally with the top, inner and bottom edges of the bottom, end and top flanges of the frame portions related thereto, said bottom flanges, outer edge portions of the adjacent end flanges and the adjacent end portions of the top flanges being integrally joined together.

9. An elongate unitary receptacle of the character referred to formed of flexible plastic including, a pair of elongate, vertically disposed frame portions arranged in side-by-side relationship and shell portions carried by the frame portions and defining the work receiving chamber, said frame portions having straight horizontally disposed, longitudinal bottom flanges with flat, opposing inner surfaces and top and bottom edges, end flanges joined integrally to the ends of the bottom flanges to project upwardly therefrom and having flat opposing inner surfaces, vertical longitudinally inwardly disposed inner edges and longitudinal outwardly and downwardly disposed inclined outer edges, and straight horizontally disposed top flanges with flat opposing inner surfaces and top and bottom edges coextensive with the longitudinal extent of the receptacle and joined integrally with the upper edge portions of the end flanges, said shell portions being formed to receive a portion of the work to be received and joined integrally with the top, inner and bottom edges of the bottom, end and top flanges of the frame portions related thereto, said bottom flanges, outer edge portions of the adjacent end flanges and the adjacent end portions of the top flanges being integrally joined together, and locking and sealing means releasa-bly securing the upper flanges in side-byside and receiving relationship, said sealing and locking means including, laterally inwardly projecting beads on said inner opposing surface of one of said top flanges, and extending longitudinally thereof between the points of joinder at the opposite ends of the top flanges, and laterally inwardly opening grooves in the inner surface of the other top flange to extend longitudinally thereof, between the points of joinder at the opposite ends of the flanges and adapted to cooperatively receive the beads on said one flange.

10. An elongate unitary receptacle of the character referred to formed of flexible plastic including, a pair of elongate, vertically disposed frame portions arranged in side-by-side relationship and shell portions carried by the frame portions and defining the work receiving chamber, said frame portions have straight horizontally disposed, longitudinal bottom flanges with flat, opposing inner surfaces and top and bottom edges, end flanges joined integrally to the ends of the bottom flanges to project upwardly therefrom and having flat opposing inner surfaces, vertical longitudinally inwardly disposed inner edges and longitudinal outwardly and downwardly disposed inclined outer edges, and straight horizontally disposed top flanges with flat opposing inner surfaces an top and bottom edges coextensive with the longitudinal extent of the receptacle and joined integrally with the upper edge portions of the end flanges, said shell portions being formed to receive a portion of the work to be received and joined integrally with the top, inner and bottom edges of the bottom, end and top flanges of the frame portions related thereto, said bottom flanges being integrally joined together throughout their longitudinal extent, and sealing and locking means releasably securing the adjacent related end flanges together along their inclined outer edge portions, said means including elongate beads formed on and projecting from the inner surface of one end flange of each adjacent pair of end flanges and longitudinally inwardly opening grooves formed in the inner surface of the other end flange of each adjacent pair of end flanges, and adapted to cooperatively receive the beads.

11. An elongate unitary receptacle of the character referred to formed of flexible plastic including, a pair of elongate, vertically disposed frame portion arranged in side-by-side relationship and shell portions carried by the frame portions having straight horizontally disposed, longitudinal bottom flanges with flat, opposing inner surfaces and top and bottom edges, end flanges joined integraly to the ends of the bottomflanges to project upwardly therefrom and having flat opposing inner surfaces, vertical longitudinally inwardly disposed inner edges and longitudinal outwardly and downwardly disposed inclined 12. outer edges, and straight horizontally disposed top flanges with flat opposing inner surfaces and top and bottom edges coextensive with the longitudinal extent of the receptacle and joined integrally with the upper edge portions of the end flanges, said shell portions being formed to receive a portion of the work to be received and joined integrally with the top, inner and bottom edges of the bottom, end and top flanges of the frame portions related thereto, said bottom flanges being integrally joined together throughout their longitudinal extent and establishing flexible hinge means pivotally connecting the frame portions together along their lower portions, and locking and sealing means for releasably securing the top and end flanges together including laterally inwardly projecting longitudinal beads on the inner surface of one of the top flanges, laterally inwardly opening grooves in the inner surface of the other top flange, to cooperatively receive the beads, extensions on the ends of the beads on said one top flange, and extending downwardly and longitudinally inwardly along the outer edge portions of the inner surfaces of the end flanges, related to said one top flange, and extensions of the grooves in the other top flange and extending downwardly and longitudinally inwardly along the outer edge portion of the inner surface of the end flanges related to said other top flange, the bead extensions serving to cooperatively engage in the opposing groove extensions related thereto and to releasably secure the outer edge portions of the end flanges together and to seal therebetween.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STAT ES PATENTS 2,587,033 2/1952 Dobbs et al 28 3,063,487 11/1962 Mullin 15037 3,160,186 12/1964 Conley 15037 3,176,743 4/1965 Bundy 15042 FRANKLIN T. GARRETT, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3426814 *Jul 26, 1967Feb 11, 1969William C BundyContainer construction
US3467768 *Jul 3, 1968Sep 16, 1969Plummer Walter AConnector block boot
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US7805881 *May 14, 2007Oct 5, 2010Patrick John KavanaughBead attachment
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/526, 174/92, 174/DIG.110, 174/138.00F, 383/63
International ClassificationA45C11/24, A45C13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA45C13/10, A45C11/24, Y10S174/11
European ClassificationA45C13/10, A45C11/24