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Publication numberUS3281000 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 25, 1966
Filing dateAug 17, 1964
Priority dateAug 17, 1964
Publication numberUS 3281000 A, US 3281000A, US-A-3281000, US3281000 A, US3281000A
InventorsLowen Stanley
Original AssigneeLowen Stanley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure apparatus
US 3281000 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 25, 1966 s. LOWEN 3,281,000

CLOSURE APPARATUS Filed Aug. 17, 1964 FIG. 2

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INVENTOR Stanley Lowen TTORNEY United States Patent 3,281,000 CLOSURE APPARATUS Stanley Lowen, 37 Huntington Drive, Yonkers, N.Y. Filed Aug. 17, 1964, Ser. No. 390,121 Claims. (Cl. 215-41) The present invention relates, generally, to a constantly effective closure apparatus particularly adapted for use with containers.

More particularly, this invention pertains to a unitary unusually efficient substantially indefinitely effective closure apparatus particularly adapted for use with containers, such as bottles, and the like, said closure apparatus comprising a sealing assembly, integrally structurally operatively associated therewith, that is so constructed and arranged as to present an unusually efficient seal with a container over a substantially indefinite period of time, irrespective of the number of operational cycles, that is, the number of times the closure apparatus has been removed from operative association with a container, enabling the discharge of the contents thereof, and replaced in operative association therewith to preclude inadvertent and premature discharge of the remainder of the aforesaid contents.

It has heretofore been suggested that a closure device be so constructed and arranged as to be thread-ably structurally operatively associated with a container. Closure devices as are presently available are fabricated of such materials as metel, as well as those plastics known to the trade as thermosetting or hard plastics; i.e., phenolformaldehyde, urea formaldehyde, and the like. Thus, once the liquid commodity is disposed within a container, a closure device is then threadably applied thereto to preclude inadvertent, undesirable and premature discharge therefrom, particularly during transportation and storage.

It is desirable that such a closure effectively seal and maintain the liquid contents of the container therewithin. This desideratum is of particular significance when it is realized that the contents thereof will be vibrated, agitated, and the like, especially during transportation. Another desideratum is that the seal presented by the closure device should be particularly effective, since substantially all liquids are, at least to some extent, volatile. In addition, the closure device should of course be so constructed and arranged as to enable its removal from and replacement upon the container with facility. In this latter connection, the closure device should be capable of withstanding a number of cycles of operation, that is, removal from and replacement upon the container, in the absence of any deleterious effect on its operational efficiency.

To this end, it has th-eretofore been suggested that a liner, fabricated of a relatively soft material, be structurally operatively associated with the closure device. This liner, which is particularly adapted to be disposed between the aforesaid device and the mouth of the container, as the former is threadably applied to the latter, effects the required seal hereinbefore discussed. Thus, as torque is applied to the closure device, a compressive force is applied to the liner, enabling it to effect a seal at least with the mouth of the container. At the same time, the liner is fixedly positioned between and with respect to the closure device and the mouth of the container, precluding movement of the liner, and, in turn, leakage therepast.

Such liners as are presently available introduce certain inherent disadvantages. Thus, substantially irrespective of the material employed in fabricating the liner, the same is subject to deformation as a compressive force is applied thereto. However, it has been found that presently available liners are incapable of deforming in such a manner as to correspond with any and all of the irregularitie that may be present at the mouth of the container. This is particularly manifested when it is realized that the degree of deformation the liner is capable of is proportionate to the compressibility factor of the material from which it is fabricated. To compensate for this phenomena, the inherent tendency is to apply excessive force in threadably applying the closure device to the container mouth. This results in a condition known as hard lock that deleteriously effects the ability of the consumer to remove the closure from the container with facility. Additionally, it has been found that such liners as are presently available tend to stick to the mouth of the containers, or are incapable of effecting the proper seal.

With the advent of polyethylene, an attempt has been made to fabricate a unitary closure device, comprising an integral liner or sealing assembly, as opposed to invoking the use of hard plastics and a separable liner, as discussed hereinbefore. In this instance, the closure device itself presents a portion capable of performing a sealing function, since the closure is generally completely fabricated of a material possessing the required softness. Nevertheless, the torque required to cause the sealing assembly to create an effective seal with the mouth of a container when the closure device is threadably applied thereto distorts the skirt of the closure, causing the latter to flare outwardly about the lower peripheral edge thereof. Accordingly, the threads disposed interiorly of the closure device will jump the corresponding threads disposed exteriorly of the container. It will be extremely difficult therefore to completely run home the closure device upon the container mouth, with the result that the seal to be effected therebetween will be anything but efficient. Moreover, polyethylene presents a particularly low coefficient of friction when operatively associated with glass, especially if the glass is moist. It can be seen, therefore, that a unitary closure device fabricated of this material as is presently available introduces numerous disadvantages.

Accordingly having in mind each and every one of the foregoing disadvantages, and others that will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a unitary unusually efi'lcient substantially indefinitely effective closure apparatus comprising a sealing assembly, integrally struc-- turally operatively associated therewith, that is so constructed and arranged as to present an unusually efficient seal with a container over a substantially indefinite period of time, irrespective of the number of operational cycles, that is, the number of times the closure apparatus has been removed from operative association with a container, enabling the discharge of the contents thereof, and replaced in operative association therewith to preclude inadvertent and premature discharge of the remainder of the aforesaid contents.

Another object of this invention is to provide a unitary unusually efficient substantially indefinitely effective closure apparatus particularly adapted for use with containers, such as bottles, and the like, said closure apparatus comprising a sealing assembly integrally structurally operatively associated therewith that is so constructed and arranged as to present a plurality of sealing surfaces particularly adapted to be sequentially disposed in sealing mutual cooperative engagement with a corresponding plurality of sealing surfaces presented by said container, enabling said sealing assembly to present an unusually efficient seal with a container over a substantially indefinite period of time, irrespective of the number of operational cycles, that is, the number of times the closure apparatus ha been removed from operative association with a container, enabling the discharge of the contents thereof, and replaced in operative association therewith to preclude inadvertent and prema ture discharge of the remainder of the aforesaid contents.

Yet another primary object of the present invention is to provide a closure apparatus particularly adapted for use with containers, such as bottles, and the like, said closure apparatus being fabricated of any suitable thermoplastic material such as polypropylene, having the requisite characteristics, among others, of heat resistance, and flexibility, and comprising a sealing assembly integrally structurally operatively associated therewith that is so constructed and arranged as to present a plurality of sealing surfaces particularly adapted to be sequentially disposed in sealing mutual cooperative engagement with a corresponding plurality of sealing surfaces presented by said container, enabling said sealing assembly to present an unusually eflicient seal with a container over a substantially indefinite period of time, irrespective of the number of operational cycles, that is, the number of times the closure apparatus has been removed from operative association with a container, enabling the discharge of the contents thereof, and replaced in operative association therewith to preclude inadvertent and premature discharge of the remainder of the aforesaid contents.

Furthermore, a primary object of this invention is to provide a closure apparatus particularly adapted for use with containers, such as bottles, and the like, said closure apparatus being fabricated of any suitable thermoplastic material, such as polypropylene, having the requisite characteristics among others, of heat resistance and flexibility, and comprising a sealing assembly integrally structurally operatively associated therewith that is soconstructed and arranged as to present a plurality of sealing surfaces particularly adapted to be sequentially disposed in sealing mutual cooperative engagement with a corresponding plurality of sealing surfaces presented by said container, enabling said sealing assembly to present an unusually efficient seal with a container over a substantially indefinite period of time, irrespective of the number of operational cycles, that is, the number of times the closure apparatus has been removed from operative association with a container, enabling the discharge of the contents, thereof, and replaced in operative association therewith to preclude inadvertent and premature discharge of the remainder of the aforesaid contents, enabling the presentation of a closure apparatus that is economical of fabrication, and offers decorative possibilities not heretofore possible, while at the same time further enabling the presentation of such an apparatus that is reliable and operable with extreme facility.

Other objects and important features of the invention will be apparent from a study of the specification following taken with the drawings, which together show, illustrate, describe and disclose a preferred embodiment or modification of the invention and what is new considered to be the best mode of practicing the principles thereof. Other embodiments or modifications may be suggested to those having the benefit of the teachings herein, and such other embodiments or modifications are intended to be reserved especially as they fall within the scope and spirit of the subjoined claims.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is an exploded cross-sectional view of the closure apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention, illustrating an exemplary container with which said apparatus is particularly adapted to be structurally operatively associated;

FIGURE 2 is a partial detailed cross-sectional view of the closure apparatus and container illustrated in FIG- URE 1, but showing the position of the former with respect to the latter after only one step in the closing sequence of steps has been completed;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2, but showing the position of the closure apparatus with respect to the container after substantially all of the steps in the closing sequence thereof have been completed;

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 3, but illustrating another embodiment of a closure apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view of yet another embodiment of the present invention; and

FIGURE 6 is a view similar to FIGURES 2, 3 and 4, but showing still another embodiment of the present invention.

With reference now to the drawing, and particularly FIGURE 1 thereof, there is illustrated therein a closure apparatus, constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention, and generally designated by the reference character 10, said closure a paratu being particularly adapted to be structurally operatively associated with a container 12. At the outset it will be understood that the closure apparatus 10 is particularly adapted for use with many types of containers, the construction, configuration and arrangement of which may be Widely varied, and, accordingly, the container 12 illustrated in the drawing is intended by way of example only, and not by way of limitation.

The container 12 may be fabricated of any suitable material, such as glass, and the like, and may be of any suitable construction that defines a neck 12 having a generally planar upper end 16. The upper end 16 is rounded at each of its interior and exterior diametral locations so as to present a plurality of sealing surfaces 18 and 20. The surface 18, which is generally interiorly disposed (as opposed to the surface 20, which is generally exteriorly disposed) defines the periphery of a mouth 22 that provides ingress to and egress from the container, for purposes that are considered readily apparent. The neck 14 is so constructed and arranged a to present a generally exteriorly disposed threaded portion 23 for a purpose that is also considered readily apparent, and will more fully be described hereinafter.

The closure device, apparatus or cap 10 may be fabricated of any suitable material that possesses the requisite characteristics, among others, of heat resistance and flexibility, while, at the same time, possessing the characteristic of being resilient, enabling the device to effect an efficient seal when disposed in a firm abutting mutually cooperative engageable relationship with respect to an object, such as the container 12. For example, it has been found that polypropylene possesses these requisite characteristics, and will enable a closure apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention, such as the closure apparatus 10, to unusually efficiently perform each and every one of its intended functions, as will hereinafter be described.

The closure device 10 comprises a skirt 24 of generally annular configuration defining a lower and an upper end 26 and 28, respectively. The skirt is further defined by a generally interiorly disposed wall 30, and a generally exteriorly disposed wall 32, the former of which is so constructed and arranged as to present a threaded portion 34 that is particularly adapted to be rotatably mutually cooperatively engagable with the threaded portion 23 of the neck 14 of the container 12, enabling the closure device or cap to be threadably run home with respect thereto, and disposed or positioned in a positively sealed closed relationship therewith.

The closure device 10 comprises further a generally horizontally disposed radially inwardly extending membrane 36 that is integrally structurally operatively associated with the skirt 24. at the wall 30. The membrane 36 is particularly adapted to be strengthened at the location of connection to the skirt 24, and, tothis end, a ledge 38 is integrally structurally operatively associated with the skirt, .and with the membrane, and in addition is disposed in underlying relationship with respect to the latter.

Still further, the cap 10 comprises a generally centrally disposed roof or ceiling 40 that is substantially horizonally aligned with the membrane 36. The ceiling may be of greater transverse dimensional extent or thickness than the membrane, and is particularly adapted to be integrally structurally operatively associated therewith by means of a plurality of inclined membranes 42 and 44 that extend therebetween. The membranes 42 and 44 are disposed in acute angular relationship with respect to one another, as defined by the shortest arc extending therebetween. In addition, the membranes 42 and 44 are disposed in obtuse angular relationship with respect to the membrane 36 and the ceiling 40, respectively, so that it may be said the inclined membranes are generally downwardly inclined in a direction towards one another.

With continued reference to FIGURE v1, and with reference now to FIGURES 2 and 3, and assuming it is desired to dispose the cap in threaded structural operative association with the container 12 at the neck 14, the cap is disposed thereupon to enable initial engagement of the threaded portion 34 with the threaded portion 23. The cap is now rotatably moved in that one of a plurality of directions that will tend to run the cap home upon the neck. After only a portion of the total travel of the cap has been completed, the inclined membrane 42 will be initially disposed in abutting mutual cooperative engagement with the sealing surface 18 of the neck 14 of the container 12, as particularly illustrated in FIGURE 2. A first seal is thus created by the cap with respect to the container 12, at the upper end 16 of the neck 14 thereof.

The continued application of torque to the cap 10, that is, continued rotatable movement of the cap in the aforesaid one direction, results in the introduction of a force applied to the inclined membrane 42 by the sealing surface 18. The membrane will therefore tend to flex in a direction generally perpendicularly with respect thereto. However, the position of the membrane 36 relative to the skirt 24, and the longitudinal dimensional extent of this membrane relative to the same dimension of the membran 42, will produce a resultant conjoint translation of both of these membranes in a generally vertically upwardly disposed direction. In addition, this continued application of torque to the cap will dispose the sealing surface 20 in an abutting mutually cooperatively engageable relationship with the membrane 36. Accordingly, these two membranes, namely, the membrane 36 and 4-2, will define a generally triangularly configured completely annularly extending groove or recess 46. Moreover, another or second seal will be introduced or created between the cap 10 and the container 12, at the upper end 16 of the neck 14 thereof.

It is considered readily apparent that the sealing surface 18 will contact the membrane 42 before the termination of the travel of the cap in the aforesaid one direction. This is similarly true with respect to the contact made between the sealing surface 20 and the membrane 36. Accordingly, when the travel of the cap is completed, each of the sealing surfaces 18 and 20 will be disposed in a firm abutting mutually cooperatively engagable relationship with the membranes 42 and 36, respectively, enabling the presentation of an unusually efficient seal between the cap 10 and the container 12 to preclude any inadvertent, undesirable and premature discharge of its contents therefrom. This is particularly true since, as opposed to invoking the use of the fiat or planar generally horizontally disposed surface defined by the upper end 16 of the neck 14, there i sequentially effected a first seal with the inner radius thereof, and another or second seal with the outer radius thereof. The efficiency of this seal, which may, in effect, be considered as double seal, is further enhanced by its ability to function in the manner aforesaid substantially irrespective of variations in manufacturing tolerances of different containers, particularly at the upper end 16 of the neck 14. Thus, the only difference resulting from variations in the diametral dimensional extents of the walls of the neck 14 will be the exact location along the longitudinal dimensional extent of the membrane 42 and 36 at which they are contacted by the sealing surfaces 18 and 21, respectivley, as opposed to their resulting in any difference in the sequence of operation, the functions to be performed, and the results to be achieved.

It will now be understood that a closure device or apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention, such as the cap 10, comprises an integral sealing assembly that is so constructed and arranged as to present a plurality of sealing surfaces, namely, the membranes 36 and 42, particularly adapted to be sequentially disposed in a firm abutting or sealing mutually cooperatively engageable relationship with respect to a correspondingplurality of sealing surfaces presented by the container, namely, the surfaces 18 and 20, enabling the closure apparatus to present an unusually eflicient seal with a container, such as the container 12, over a substantially indefinite period of time, irrespective of the number of operational cycles, that is, the number of times the closure apparatus has been removed from operative association with the container, enabling the discharge of the contents thereof, and replaced in operative association therewith to preclude inadvertent and premature discharge of the remainder of the aforesaid contents.

Moreover, the sequential introduction of a plurality of seals, or, what may be considered, in effect, a double seal, enables the presentation of the groove 46 for trapping vapors. Thus, any remaining vapors after the aforesaid one or first seal is effected will enter thi groove and be trapped therein. Accordingly, when torque is applied to the cap 10 in another of the aforesaid plurality of directions to remove it from its threaded structural operative association with the neck 14 of the container, the aforesaid second or other seal willfirst be broken, enabling a gradual escape of such vapors, and a substantial, if not complete, elimination of an explosion, particularly when the container 12 has been filled with a carbonated liquid.

With reference now to FIGURE 4, wherein like reference characters indicate like parts, but wherein the reference characters are primed, there is illustrated therein another embodiment of a closure apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention, generally designated by the reference character 10'.

The closure apparatus or cap 10 may be fabricated of the same material as the cap 10, namely, a thermoplastic material, such as polypropylene, or may be fabricated of any other suitable material, such as metal. In addition, it may be desired that decorative indicia be applied to the cap. This can be accomplished when the cap is fabricated as a single integral component, as is the cap 10. However, under certain circumstances, it may be desired to fabricate the cap of a plurality of component parts.

To this end, the cap 10' comprises, in addition to the ledge 38', a completely annular mounting ledge 48. The ledge 48 is integrally structurally operatively associated with the skirt 24' and with the membrane 36, and is disposed in overlaying relationship with respect to the ledge 38'. Additionally, the ledge 48 extends generally radially inwardly from the inner wall 30' of the skirt, enabling a disk 50, fabricated of any suitable material, and in any suitable manner, to be positioned thereupon. It is this disk that is particularly adapted to have any suitable and desired decorative indicia applied therto. It is, of course, necessary that the disk be maintained in this position and precluded from inadvertent removal from the cap, and, to this end, the disk my be so constructed and arranged as to provide a friction fit with the skirt, or the latter may be provided with an integral generally completely annular radially inwardly extending lip 52. In other respects, the cap 10' is substantially similar to the cap 10, and, therefore, the operation of each, as hereinbe'fore set forth, is substantially the same.

With reference now to FIGURE 5, wherein like parts are indicated by like reference characters, but wherein the reference characters are double-primed, there is illustrated therein yet another embodiment of a closure apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention, generally designated by the reference character 10."

The closure apparatus or cap 10" is substantially similar to the cap 10 in all respects, and, therefore, the operation of each, as hereinbefore set forth, is generally the same. However, if it is desired to apply decorative indicia other than directly to the cap, and it is not desired to invoke the use of the disk 50, then it is within the ambit of the present invention to provide the cap 10" with a completely annular enclosure 54. The enclosure may be fabricated of any suitable material, and in any suitable manner, and comprises a skirt 56 and a roof or ceiling 58. The enclosure may be substantially fixedly structurally operatively associated with the skirt 24 of the cap 10 in any suitable manner, as by means of press-fitting, staking, and the like. It is conceivable that the enclosure 54 desirably be removable with respect to the cap, and, therefore, the means by which it is structurally operatively associated therewith should be chosen accordingly.

With reference now to FIGURE 6, wherein like parts are indicated by like reference characters, but wherein the reference characters are primed thrice over, there is illustrated therein a further embodiment of closure apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention, generally designated by the reference character 10".

The closure apparatus or cap 10" is generally similar in substantially all respects as the cap 10, and, therefore, the operation Otf each is the same. However, as hereinbefore pointed out, manufacturing tolerances of containers, such as the container 12, will vary widely, depending, of course, upon the manufacturing process and the material from which it is fabricated. This is particularly true with respect to the outer diametral extent of the neck 14, and especially the sealing surface thereof. Accordingly, it is within the ambit of the present invention that the membrane 36 be so constructed and arranged as to present a wedge-shaped configuration as by tapering the lower surface 60 thereof generally radially inwardly and vertically upwardly towards the location at which it is integrally structurally operatively associated with the membrane 42". The wedge-shaped or tapered configuration of this membrane will enable it to be particularly adapted to compensate for and accommodate substantially any variation in the diametral dimension of the outer wall of the neck 14 of the container, and particularly in the area of the sealing surface 20 thereof. The operation of the cap 10" remains substantially the same as the cap 10, however, as pointed out above.

Certain terminology pertaining to direction has been used in the foregoing description in a relative sense. For example, such terminology as upper, lower, vertical, horizontal, and the like, has been used. This terminology is intended in its normal and accepted sense, and to facilitate an understanding of the present invention. Accordingly, as used in the foregoing description, and if and when used in the ensuing claims, such terminology is to be interpreted, construed, and given the broadest possible construction, and is not in any way to be considered limiting.

While the invention has been shown, illustrated, described and disclosed in terms of an embodiment or modification which it has assumed in practice, the scope of the invention should not be deemed to be limited by the precise embodiment or modifications herein shown, illustrated, described or disclosed, such other embodiments or modifications intended to be reserved especially as they fall within the scope of the claims here appended.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with a container comprising a neck having a plurality of radially spaced sealing surfaces, and defining a mouth for providing ingress thereto and egress therefrom, the improvement comprising closure apparatus removably engaged with the neck of said container for enclosing said mouth, and comprising a sealing assembly having a plurality of flexible membranes connected to one another; said membranes, in said position in which the closure assembly is removably engaged with said neck, being disposed in a stressed position in which one of said membranes firmly sealingly engages one of said sealing surfaces, and an other of said membranes sequentially firmly sealingly engages an other of said sealing surfaces; said membranes, in their stressed position of firm sealing engagement with said sealing surfaces, defining a groove of generally triangular configuration; said membranes having an unstressed position in which said other membrane is disposed in a generally horizontal plane, and said one membrane is disposed in a plane extending an'gularly and downwardly from said horizontal plane; said membranes defining an obtuse angle therebetween when disposed in said unstressed position, enabling said one membrane to sealingly engage said one sealing surface, and said surface to apply a force to said membrane to translate the membrane to its said stressed position of firm sealing engagement with said sealing surface when the closure is removably engaged with the neck, and further enabling said one membrane to translate said other membrane to its said stressed position in which it is sequentially disposed in firm sealing engagement with said other sealing surface.

2. Closure apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein:

said closure apparatus is fabricated of a thermoplastic material.

3. Closure apparatus comprising, in combination: a plurality of radially spaced sealing surfaces; a skirt; and a sealing assembly removably engaged with said sealing surfaces, and comprising a plurality of flexible membranes connected to one another; said membranes being disposed in a stressed position in which one of said membranes firmly sealingly engages one of said sealing surfaces, and an other of said membranes sequentially firmly sealingly engages an other of said sealing surfaces; said membranes, in their stressed position of firm sealing engagement with said sealing surfaces, defining a groove of generally triangular configuration; said membranes having an unstressed position in which said other membrane is disposed in a generally horizontal plane, and said one membrane is disposed in a plane extending angularly and downwardly from said horizontal plane; said membranes defining an obtuse angle 'therebetween when disposed in said unstressed position, enabling said one membrane to sealingly engage said one sealing surface, and said surface to apply a force to said membrane to translate the membrane to its said stressed position of firm sealing engagement with said sealing surface when the sealing assembly is removably engaged with said sealing surfaces, and further enabling said one membrane to translate said other membrane to its said stressed position in which it is sequentially disposed in firm sealing engagement with said other sealing surface.

4. Closure apparatus as defined in claim 3, wherein:

said other membrane is connected with said skirt;

said one membrane is disposed generally radially inwardly relative to said other membrane.

5. Closure apparatus as defined in claim 4, wherein:

said closure apparatus is fabricated from a thermoplastic material having the same general characteristics as polypropylene.

6. Closure apparatus as defined .in claim 5, wherein:

said closure apparatus comprises further:

a disk fixedly structurally operatively associated with said skirt;

said disk being particularly adapted to have decorative indicia applied thereto.

7. Closure apparatus as defined in claim 5, wherein there is provided:

an enclosure particularly adapted to substantially completely enclose and be disposed about said closure apparatus;

said enclosure being particularly adapted to have deconative indicia applied thereto.

8. Closure apparatus as defined in claim 5, wherein:

said other membrane is so constructed and arranged as to present a wedge-shaped configuration;

enabling said other membrane to compensate for and accommodate variations in manufacturing tolerances of a container particularly at the outer radial portion of a neck thereof.

9. A container for dispensing material comprising, in combination, a neck having a plurality of radially disposed sealing surfaces, and defining a mouth for providing ingress to and egress from said container; closure apparatus removably engaged with the neck of said container for enclosing said mouth, and comprising a sealing assembly having a plurality of flexible membranes connected to one another; said membranes, in said position in which the closure assembly is removably engaged with said neck, being disposed in a stressed position in which one of said membranes firmly sealingly engages one of said sealing surfaces, and an other of said membranes sequentially firmly sealingly engages an other of said sealing surfaces; said membranes, in their stressed position of firm sealing engagement with said sealing surfaces, defining a groove of generally triangular configuration; said membranes having an unstressed position in which said other membrane is disposed in a generally horizontal plane, and said one membrane is disposed in a plane extending angularly and downwardly from said horizontal plane; said membranes defining van obtuse angle therebetween when disposed in said unstressed position, enabling said one membrane to sealingly engage said one sealing surface, and said surface to apply a force to said membrane to translate the membrane to its said stressed position of firm sealing engagement with said sealing surface when the closure is removably engaged with the neck, and further enabling said one membrane to tnanslate said other membrane to its said stressed position in which it is sequentially disposed in firm sealing engagement with said other sealing surface.

10. A container as defined in claim 9, wherein:

said closure apparatus comprises:

a skirt; and wherein:

said other membrane is connected with said skirt;

said one membrane is disposed generally radially inwardly relative to said other membrane.

11. A container as defined in claim 10, wherein: the neck of said container defines:

a generally planar completely annular surface.

12. A container as defined in claim 11, wherein:

said closure apparatus is fabricated from -a thermoplastic material having the same general characteristics as polypropylene.

13. A container as defined in claim 12, wherein:

said closure apparatus comprises further:

a skirt; and

a disk fixedly structurally operatively associated with said skirt;

said disk being particularly adapted to have decorative indicia applied thereto.

14. A container as defined in claim 12, wherein there provided:

an enclosure particularly enclosing said closure apparatus;

said enclosure being particularly adapted to have decorative indicia applied thereto.

15. A container as defined in claim 12, wherein:

said other membrane is so constructed and arranged as to present a wedge-shaped configuration;

enabling said other membrane to compensate for and accommodate variations in manufacturing tolerances of said container particularly at the outer radial portion of the neck thereof.

References Cited by the Examiner JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

FRANKLIN T. GARRETT, Examiner.

V. A. TOMPSON, D. F. NORTON, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3335892 *May 25, 1966Aug 15, 1967Hercules IncFoam plastic cap
US3370732 *Feb 16, 1967Feb 27, 1968Polytop CorpCap seal
US3482725 *Dec 6, 1966Dec 9, 1969Klm CoClosures and methods of making the same
US3565274 *Mar 19, 1969Feb 23, 1971Guild MoldersClosure and sealing assembly for bottles
US3901404 *May 3, 1973Aug 26, 1975Dairy Cap CorpBottle cap
US4209102 *Aug 21, 1978Jun 24, 1980Aluminum Company Of AmericaLinerless plastic closure
US4274544 *Mar 11, 1980Jun 23, 1981The Continental Group, Inc.Single-piece plastic closure having integral seal forming means
US4322012 *May 9, 1980Mar 30, 1982Dairy Cap CorporationThreaded plastic bottle cap
US4341320 *Oct 3, 1980Jul 27, 1982Libit Sidney MTampering indicating bottle cap and bottle
US5271531 *Apr 27, 1993Dec 21, 1993Seaquist Closures, A Division Of Pittway Corp.Dispensing closure with pressure-actuated flexible valve
US5458113 *Aug 12, 1994Oct 17, 1995Becton Dickinson And CompanyCollection assembly
US5531363 *Jun 10, 1994Jul 2, 1996Aptargroup, Inc.Dispensing closure cartridge valve system
US5927567 *Nov 12, 1996Jul 27, 1999Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Dispensing closure and method of making
US6673295Sep 14, 1998Jan 6, 2004Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Method of making a dispensing closure
US7041246Aug 27, 2003May 9, 2006Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Method of making a dispensing closure
US7568587 *Sep 8, 2004Aug 4, 2009Dayton Systems Group, Inc.Pressure indicating feature for replaceable container caps
CN101370714BSep 11, 2006Oct 12, 2011意科凯普有限公司sealed caps and combination with containers
EP0495440A2 *Jan 13, 1992Jul 22, 1992AptarGroup, Inc.Dispensing closure with pressure-actuated flexible valve
WO2007031719A2 *Sep 11, 2006Mar 22, 2007Ecocap LtdClosure
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/344, 215/DIG.100
International ClassificationB65D51/24, B65D41/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D41/0428, Y10S215/01, B65D51/24
European ClassificationB65D41/04B2, B65D51/24