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Publication numberUS3281997 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1966
Filing dateDec 10, 1962
Priority dateDec 10, 1962
Publication numberUS 3281997 A, US 3281997A, US-A-3281997, US3281997 A, US3281997A
InventorsLeonard John R
Original AssigneeLeonard John R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chimney-simulative roof embellishments
US 3281997 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1966 J. R. LEONARD CHIMNEY-SIMULATIVE ROOF EMBELLISHMENTS 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 10, 1962 INVENTOR.

" JOHN R. LEONARD ATTORNEY Nov. 1, 1966 .1. R. LEONARD 3,281,997

CHIMNEY-SIMULATIVE ROOF EMBELLISHMENTS Filed Dec. 10, 1962 5 Sheets$heet 2 FIG.||

F l2 INVENTOR.

JOHN R. LEONARD BYWW ATTORNEY Nov. 1, 1966 J. R. LEQNARD 3,281,997

CHIMNEY-SIMULATIVE ROOF EMBELLISHMENTS Filed Dec. 10, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 F IG. 1 3

F IG. l5 INVENTOR.

JOHN R. LEONARD ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofiice 3,281,997 Patented Nov. 1, 1966 3,281,997 CHIMNEY-SIMULATHVE ROOF EMBELLISHMENTS John R. Leonard, 12164 Criterion, St. Louis County, Mo. Filed Dec. 10, 1962, Ser. No. 243,437 12 Claims. (13!. 52-57) This invention relates in general to certain new and useful improvements in architectural embellishments for residential roofs and, more particularly, to a prefabricated simulated chimney provided for attachment to a roof.

Due to the high cost of labor and structural materials, masonry chimneys and masonry flues have become unduly expensive for residential construction. Moreover, in lowcost residential construction the extensive use of gas-fired furnaces and gas hot water heaters has made it possible to employ relatively inexpensive metal stacks or flue pipes which project only a few feet above the roof. It has, therefore, become a common practice in the building industry to dispense with conventional masonry chimneys and utilize instead a heavy metal flue pipe.

These metal flue pipes or'stacks are usually unsightly and the absence of a conventional masonry chimney immediately lowers the value and appearance of the building. Some efforts have been made in the past to overcome this problem by providing chimney housings which can be mounted upon or around the flue .pipe and disguise it. The chimney housings heretofore developed, however, have been very costly and diflicult to install. One rather serious disadvantage of such structures resides in the fact that they must necessarily be attached to the roof with some type of fastener and this inevitably causes roof leaks.

A second rather serious disadvantage of such structures resides in the fact that they normally impede the natural air draft which carries away the smoke from the stack. Moreover, such chimney housings are accumulators of rain water and during rainy seasons allow a pocket of water to build up arund the stack and overflow into it with resultant damage to the furnace and hot water heater.

Another problem which has been encountered in the use of chimney housings results from the fact that residential roofs do not have any standard pitch. The pitch of residential roofs will vary from a very shallow angle of ten degrees to a very steep angle of forty-five degrees or more. In fact, this is a matter of individual taste and depends largely upon the architectural styling which has been selected. Consequently, each chimney housing must be designed especially for the house on which it is to be installed or the chimney housing must be fabricated with rather elaborate built-in geometrical guidelines to accommodate encountered range of roof-pitches. Either expedient is quite costly and to a very large extent destroys any economy which would be achieved by eliminating a genuine masonry chimney.

It is, therefore, the primary object of the present invention to provide a simulated chimney which can be attached to a roof or similar supporting structure with a minimum amount of effort and which does not require skilled labor or specialized installation tools.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a simulated chimney of the type stated which is relatively simple and economical to manufacture.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a simulated chimney of the type stated which will not impede the normal lair flow across the chimney flue, and yet will effectively screen unsightly flue pipes or metal stacks from public view.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a simulated chimney of 'the type stated which is constructed in such manner that it is capable of being attached to a roof or similar structure by the home-owner without resort to skilled labor.

In the accompanying drawings- FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a simulated chimney constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the simulated chimney;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are side elevational views showing the methods of attaching the simulated chimney to a roof;

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 55 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 66 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of a modified form of simulated chimney constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the simulated chimney ofFIG. 7 taken from the opposite side with respect to FIG. 6;

FIGS. 9 and 10 are side elevational views showing the method of fitting the simulated chimney of FIG. 7 to a roof;

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view showing the simulated chimney of FIG. 7 in attached position;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 1212 of FIG. 11.;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of another modified form of simulated chimney constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

FIG. 14 is a side elevational view of the modified form of simulated chimney shown in FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 1515 of FIG. 14; and

FIG. 16 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 1616 of FIG. 15.

Referring now in more detail and by reference characters to the drawings, A designates a simulated chimney which comprises a pre-formed solid rectangular block 1 formed of a non-burning polyurethane foam, flame resistant polystyrene foam or other similar rigid but lightweight material, having a front face 2, a back face 3, a pair of transverse side faces 4, 5, a top face 6, and a bottom face 7. Rigidly secured to the front face 2 adjacent its lower margin, and extending transversely thereacross, is a flange or bracket 8 which is integrally provided along its lower longitudinal margin with a hinge-forming tube 9 which is sized to accommodate a pintle rod 10. By reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, it can be seen that the pintle rod 10 extends outwardly beyond the side faces 4, 5, for a short distance and is maintained in close proximity to the adjoining margins of the front face 2, and the bottom face 7.

Swingably mounted on one of the extended ends of the pintle rod 10 is an angle-guide 11 of L-shaped crosssection and integrally including a normally vertical flange 12 which is integrally joined along its longitudinal margin to a laterally projecting flange 13. Similarly mounted on the other projecting end of the pintle rod 10 is a matching angle-guide 14 of L-shaped cross-section and having a normally vertical flange 15 which is integrally joined along its longitudinal margin to a laterally projecting flange 16. The angle-guides 11, 14, are hinged from the pintle rod 10 in such a manner that the lines between the axis of thepintle rod 10 and the centers of gravity of the angle-guides 11, 14, are parallel to the planes of the underfaces of the projecting flanges 13, 16, so that, when the angle-guides 11, 14, hang down under the influence of gravity, these planes will be in true vertical position. The projecting flanges 13, 16, are provided with the lines of spaced apertures 17 and the normally vertical flanges 12, 15, are each provided with a single aperture 18 located adjacent the outer or freeswinging end thereof.

The simulated chimney A can be very simply fitted to a pitched roof as shown in FIG. 4 by laying the simulated chimney A down upon its back face 3 along the surface of the roof in front of the projecting flue pipe or stack s, as shown in FIG. 3. In this position, the angle-guides 11, 14, will swing freely down into vertical position under the'influence of gravity and hang in this position so that the flat faces of the projecting flanges 13, 16, will define a plane which is accurately located at an angle x with respect to the bottom face 7. It will be evident, as a matter of simple geometry, that this angle x is precisely equal to the angle y between the surface of the roof R and the true horizontal. The angleguides are then fastened in position by inserting pins 19 through the apertures 18.

Thereupon, the base portion of the block 1 is suitably out along this plane as established by the flanges 13, 16, so that, when set in upright position upon the roof R, it will appear in a truly vertical position, as shown in FIG. 4. Since the block 1 is made of foamed synthetic resin it is easily cut with a knife or carpenters saw. In this connection, it should be noted that the angle-guides 11, 14, are slightly shorter than the transverse dimension of the block 1, that is to say, they are shorter than the width of the side walls 4, 5, so that they never project beyond the front face 2. When the block 1 is cut or beveled, as above described, the underside thereof is coated with a thick viscous film of catalyzed epoxy resin adhesive and, similarly, the upper surface of the roof R is coated in the area in which the simulated chimney A is to be attached. Epoxy resin adhesives are conventional and, therefore, not described in detail herein. The block 1 is then set into the body of adhesive applied to the roof and gently shifted around to settle it firmly as well as to line it up square with the building. In addition, it can be adjusted with a level to assure precise vertical alignment. Upon setting, the resinous film will set to form a hard permanent bond in which the simulated chimney A is permanently secured to the roof R in the manner as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. The underside of the horizontal plate 14 is also coated with the epoxy resin adhesive to aid in aflixing the block 1 to the roof R, and as the simulated chimney A is squeezed down into place the adhesive will flow upwardly through the apertures 17 increasing the holding power of the adhesive bond. It can be seen that the stack s is always hidden from view from the front side or the rearward side of the building by the simulated chimney A and by the peak of the roof R. In other words, if the stack s were projecting from the roof R on the forward side of the building, the simulated chimney A would be affixed to the roof R in a position in front of the stack s. The simulated chimney A would then hide the stack s from view on the forward side of the building and the ridge of the roof R would hide the stack s from the rearward side of the building. By this mode of construction, the simulated chimney A does not interfere with the normal air-flow and draft across the stack s. Of course, the stack s is not entirely hidden from view when the structure having the roof R is approached from the side. However, the simulated chimney A is much more predominant than the stack s and will immediately attract the attention of the viewers.

The polyurethane foam block 1 is preferably surface-contoured and formed with a colored pigment to simulate the natural brick. Moreover, the block 1 may be painted on its exterior surface with a series of white stripes to represent the mortar lines and, thus, giving the outer appearance of a masonry chimney. It should be noted that if the roof R is made of shingles, the epoxy resin adhesive may also be applied to the underside of the overhanging margins or flaps of any shingles on the roof R in the area to which the simulated chimney A is fastentd and thereby secure each shingle to the next underlying shingle so that wind pressure against the sides of the simulated chimney A will not peel the shingles up away from the roof R.

It is possible to provide a modified form of simulated chimney B, substantially as shown in FIGS. 7-12, which is adapted for mounting straddlewise across the ridge of a roof R and comprises a solid rectangular block 20 also formed of a polyurethane or polystyrene foam, as is the simulated chimney A. The simulated chimney B comprises a front face 21, a back face 22, a pair of transverse side faces 23, 24, a top face 25, and a bottom face 26.

Rigidly mounted within the block 20 and projecting at its opposite end outwardly from the transverse side faces 23, 24, is a hinge rod 27 which is so located that it is equidistant from the front face 21 and the rear face 22. Swingably mounted on opposite projecting ends of the hinge rod 27 are pairs of opposed angle-guides 28, 29, which are substantially identical to the previously described angle-guides 11, 14, and have a length which is slightly less than half the transverse dimension of the block 20. The angle-guides 28, 29, integrally include normally vertical flanges 30, 30, and laterally projecting flanges 31, 31, the latter having lines of spaced aligned apertures 32, 32'. The adjacent ends of the flanges 30, 30', are chamfered in the manner as shown in FIG. 7 so that they will not interfere with each other when the angle-guides 28, 29, are in final position. Finally, the flanges 30, 30', are provided with apertures 33, 33', respectively, which correspond to the apertures 18 of the previously described simulated chimney A. Swingably mounted on the opposite transverse end of the hinge rod 27 is a pair of guide supports 34, 35, which are substantially identical to the guide supports 28, 29, and are respectively provided with pairs of normally vertical flanges 36, 36', and laterally projecting flanges 37, 37', the latter preferably having lines of apertures 32, 32, respectively, which are identical in type, location, and function to the apertures 32, 32', of the flanges 31, 31' The normally vertical flanges 36, 36', are similarly provided with apertures 39, 39', which also correspond to the previously described apertures 18. It should also be noted that the hinge rod 27 is sufliciently spaced from the bottom face 26 so that a notch having any needed depth or angle can be cut in the end of the block 20.

The block 20 is also colored with a pigment which simulates the color of brick, and is pointed or indented V on its exterior surface with lines simulating mortar joints.

The bottom face 26 may be cut with a V-shaped notch so as to conform to the ridge of the roof R in the manner shown in FIG. 11, very much in the manner previously described. In order to determine the lines of cut, the block 20 is positioned on the roof R so that its top face 25 is presented upwardly toward the ridge of the roof R and its front face 21 lies in flushwise engagement upon the upper surface of the roof R. In this position, the angle-guides 28,34, will hang downwardly in a true vertical position and, in effect, act as plumb-bobs. In this position, tacks or pins 19' similar to the pins 19 are inserted through the apertures 33, 39, thereby rigidly securing the angle-guides 28 to the transverse faces 23, 24, of the block 20. It is to be noted that the opposite angle-guides 29 are swung upwardly out of the way. After the angle-guides 28 are secured, the block 20 is moved to the other side of the roof R or to the position as shown in FIG. 10, also with top face 25 spaced a short distance downwardly away from the ridge of the roof R. In this position, however, the rear face 22 will lie flushwise engagement upon the upper surface of the roof R, and the angle-guides 29 will hang downwardly in a vertical position. Thereupon, tacks or pins 19 similar to the pins 19 are inserted through the apertures 33', 39', for rigidly securing the angle-guides 29 to the rigidly secured, projecting flanges 31, 31', thereof form guide lines from which a V-shaped notch can be cut. The angle of cut is obviously equal to the angle of the ridge or peak of the roof R. Consequently, the simulated chimney B will precisely fit upon the roof R in the manman as show-n in FIG. 11. -It will be noted, for example, that the guide member 23 is attached to that inclined portion of the roof which formed the support for the chimney while the guide member 28 was being secured thereto by the pins 19.

It is also possible to provide another modified form of simulated chimney C substantially as shown in FIGS. l3l6, which comprises a solid rectangular block 40 also formed of a polyurethane or polystyrene foam as is the simulated chimney A, and preferably though not necessarily, being molded on its exterior surface to simulate brick work or masonry. The simulated chimney C comprises a front face 41, a back face 42, a pair of transverse side faces 43, 44-, a top face 45, and a bottom face 46. This bottom face 46 may be located at some pre-selected angle with reference to the front face 41 and back face 42, so that the user will not have to bother with cutting or fitting the simulated chimney C. This is commercially feasible for many local ities, inasmuch as builders in large metropolitan areas, either for reasons of architectural conformity or compliance with some established building code, will utilize some uniform pitch angle for the roof in the dwellings being constructed. Analysis of residential building specifications in many large metropolitan areas of the country has indicated that in some areas only a few different roofpitch angles are commonly employed. Consequently, simulated chimneys such as the simulated chimney C can be supplied in several different sizes and roof-pitch angles without encountering severe inventory problems.

In order to mount the simulated chimney C upon a suitable roof structure R", the bottom face 46 in the appropriate area of the roof structure R" is coated with an epoxy resin adhesive of the type previously described. When the adhesive coating has set sufficiently so as to have acquired the right degree of tackiness, the simulated chimney C is set into place and gently shifted around to settle it firmly as well as to line it up squarely with the building. By utilizing a sufficiently heavy layer of ad hesive, it is possible to set the simulated chimney C lightly in place and then squeeze it to one side or the other as circumstances may require, using a carpenters level to achieve substantially accurate verticality and alignment.

It should be understood that changes and modifications in the form, construction, arrangement, and combination of the several parts of the chimney-simulative roof embellishments, may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the nature and principle of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures comprising a block of relatively light weight having first and second side faces transversely connected by a third side face, said side and third faces contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, said block being adapted to be secured to said roof at a point which is horizontally spaced from a flue on said roof, and gravity responsive guide-forming means swingably mounted on said block in overlying relation to said first and second faces so as to vertically depend thereacross when the third face is brought into facewise abutment with the roof whereby to establish a plane which is located at an angle with respect to said third face along which the block may be cut in the formation of an angularly presented bottom face, said angle being equal to the angle that the supporting structure forms with respect to the vertical, said bottom face being adapted for adhesive securement to said roof so as to present the block in an upstanding chimney-simulative position.

2. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures comprising a rectangular block of relatively light weight having first and second side faces tranversely connected by a third side face, said side and third faces contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, and gravity responsive guide-forming members swing-ably mounted on said block in overlying relation to said first and second faces so as to vertically depend thereacross when the third face is brought into facewise abutment with the roof whereby to establish a plane which is located at an angle with respect to said third face along which the block may be cut in the formation of an angularly presented bottom face, said angle being equal to the angle that the supporting structure forms with respect to the vertical, said block being adapted for upstanding ohimney-simulative securement to the roof when said bottom face is brought into facewise abutment with the roof.

3. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures comprising a rectangular block of relatively light weight having first and second side faces transversely connected by front and back faces in the formation of spaced parallel corner edges, said front, back and side faces being contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, a hinge-forming member rigidly secured to said back face and having an outwardly extending element which projects beyond one of opposed side faces, and at least one gravity responsive guideforming member swingably mounted on said outwardly extending element in overlying relationship to one of said side faces so as to vertically depend thereacross when said front face is brought into facewise abutment with the roof whereby to establish a plane which is located at an angle with respect to said corner edges along which the block may be cut in the formation of an angularly presented bottom face, said angle being equal to the angle that the supporting structure forms with respect to the vertical, said bottom face being adapted for adhesive securement to said roof so as to present the block in an upstanding chimney-simulative position wherein its corner edges are presented vertically.

4-. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures comprising a rectangular block of relatively light weight having first and second side faces transversely connected by front and back faces in the formation of spaced. parallel corner edges, said front, back and side faces being contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, a hing-forming member rigidly secured to said back face and having outwardly extending elements which project beyond said opposed side faces, said hinge-forming member being perpendicularly presented to said corner edges and located in close proximity to the lower margin of said back face, gravity responsive guide-forming members swingably mounted on said outward-1y extending elements in overlying relationship to said side faces so as to vertically depend thereacross when said front face is brought into facewise abutment with the roof in such a manner that the bottom margin of the back face is horizontal and above the top margin thereof whereby to establish a plane which is located at an angle with respect to corner edges along which the block may be cut in the formation of an angularly presented bottom face, said angle being equal to the angle that the supporting structure forms with respect to the vertical, said block being adapted to be adhesively secured to said roof in an upstanding chimneysimulative position wherein its corner edges are presented vertically, means for securing said guide-forming members to the side faces at said angle, and flange-forming members projecting outwardly from said guide-forming members and adapted for securement to said roof.

5. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures comprising a block of relatively light weight having first and second spaced parallel side faces transversely connected by front and rear spaced parallel faces having top and bottom margins,

said front, back, and side faces being contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, a hinge-forming member rigidly mounted in said block and extending outwardly from said first and second side faces, and gravity responsive guideforming members having straight edges and being swingably mounted on said outwardly extending element in overlying relationship to one of said side faces so as to vertically depend thereacross when said front face is brought into facewise abutment with the roof whereby said straight margins establish a plane which is located at an angle with respect to the front face along which the block may be cut in the formation of an angularly presented bottom face, said angle being equal to the angle that the supporting structure forms with respect to the vertical, said bottom face being adapted for adhesive attachment to said roof so as to present the block in an upstanding chimney-simulative position, means for securing said guide-forming members to said side faces at said angle, and flange-forming members projecting outwardly from said guide-forming members along said straight edges and being adapted for securement to said roof.

6. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures having first and second planar roof surfaces which intersect at a dihedral angle; said simulative-chimney comprising a block of relatively hard polyurethane foam material having faces contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, said block having first and second spaced arallel side faces transversely connected by front and back faces, a hinge-forming member rigidly mounted in said block and extending outwardly from said first and second side faces, and first and second gravity responsive guide-forming members swingably mounted on each of the ends of said hinge-forming member in overlying relationship to said side faces, said first guide-forming member being adapted to hang in a vertical position across the side face of the block when the front face is brought into facewise abutment with the first roof surface whereby to establish a first plane at a first angle with respect to the front face along which the block is cut in the formation of a first angularly presented bottom face, said second guide-forming member being adapted to hang in a vertical position across the lastnamed side face of the block when the back face is brought int-o facewise abutment with the second roof surface whereby to establish a second plane at a second angle with respect to the back face along which the block is cut in the formation of a second angularly presented bottom face which intersects the first angularly presented bottom face at a dihedral angle equal to the dihedral angle of said roof structure, said first and second bottom faces being adapted for adhesive securement to said first and second roof surfaces, respectively, so as to present the block in an upstanding chimney-simulative position.

7. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures having first and second planar roof surfaces which intersect at a dihedral angle; said simulative-chimney comprising a block of relatively light weight having faces contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, said block having first and second spaced parallel side faces transversely connected by front and rear spaced parallel faces, a hinge-forming member rigidly mounted in said block and extending outwardly from said first and second side faces, said hinge-forming member being equally spaced from said front and back faces, first and second gravity responsive guide-forming members having straight edges and being swingably mounted on the outward extensions of said hinge-forming member in overlying relationship to said first and second side faces, said first guide-forming members being adapted to hang in a vertical position across the side faces of the block when the front face is brought into facewise abutment with the first roof surface whereby said straight edges thereof establish a first plane along which the block can be cut in the formation of an angularly presented first bottom face, said first plane being located at a first angle with respect to the front face of the block, said second guide-forming members being adapted to hang in a vertical position across the side faces of the block when the back face is brought into facewise abutment with the second roof surface whereby said straight edges thereof establish a second plane along which the block can be cut in the formation of an angularly presented second bottom face which intersects the first bottom face in the formation of a dihedral angle equal to the dihedral angle of said roof, said second plane being located at a second angle with respect to the back face of the block, said first and second angles being complementary to the respective angles the first and second roof surf-aces form with the horizontal, said first and second bottom faces being adapted for adhesive securement to the first and second roof surfaces, respectively, so as to present the block in an upstanding chimney-simulative position, means for securing said first and second guideforming members to said side faces at said first and second angles, respectively, and flange-like members projecting outwardly from said guide-forming members along the straight edges thereof and adapted for securement to the roof surfaces.

8. A simulated chimney provided for attachment to roofs and similar supporting structures having first and second planar roof surfaces which intersect at a dihedral angle; said simulative-chimney comprising a rectangular block of relatively light weight having faces contoured to simulate a masonry chimney, said block having first and second spaced parallel side faces perpendicularly intersected by front and back spaced parallel faces, said faces having upper and lower coplanar mar-gins, a hinge-forming member rigidly mounted in said block and extending outwardly from said first and second side faces, said hinge-forming member being equally spaced from said front and back faces in upwardly spaced relation to said lower margins, first and second gravity responsive guideforming members having straight edges and being swingably mounted on the outward extensions of said hingeforming members in overlying relationship to said first and second side faces, said first guide-forming members being adapted to hang in a vertical position across the side faces of the block when the front face is brought into facewise abutment with the first roof surface in such a manner that the lower margin thereof is presented horizontally above the upper margin thereof whereby the straight edges of the first guide-forming members establish a first plane along which the block can be cut in the formation of an angularly presented first bottom face, said first plane being located at a first angle with respect to the front face of the block, said second guide-forming members being adapted to hang in a vertical position across the side faces of the block when the back face is brought int-o facewise abutment with the second roof surface in such a manner that the lower margin thereof is presented horizontally above the upper margin thereof whereby the straight edges of the second guide-forming members establish a second plane along which the block can be cut in the formation of an angularly presented second bottom face which intersects the first bottom face in the formation of a dihedral angle equal to the dihedral angle of said roof, said second plane being located at a second angle with respect to the back face of the block, said first and second angles being complementary to the respective angles the first and second roof surfaces form with the horizontal, said first and second bottom faces being adapted for adhesive securement to the first and second roof surfaces, respectively, so as to present the block in an upstanding chimney-simulative position, means for securing said first and second guide-forming members to said side faces at said first and second angles, respectively and flange-like members projecting outwardly from said guide-formin g members along the straight edges thereof and adapted for securement to the roof surfaces.

9. The method of preparing and affixing a simulated chimney to a roof which forms an angle with respect to the horizontal, said simulated chimney having a side face intersected by a back face and at least one gravity responsive guide swingably mounted on said side face in overlying relation with said side face for establishing a vertical line thereon, said method comprising supporting said. chimney on said roof with its back face in facewise abutment therewith causing said guide to freely swing to the true vertical position thereby establishing an angle with said back face, rigidly securing the said guide to the side wall of said chimney when in said last-named position, severing the base of said chimney along the aforesaid angle formed with the base back face of the chimney thereby forming a bottom face which intersects the back face at an angle equal to the angle said roof forms with the vertical, setting said. chimney on the roof with the bottom face in facewise abutment therewith, positioning the chimney so that it attains an upright position, and rigidly securing said chimney to said roof in said lastnamed position.

10. The method of preparing and afiixing a simulated chimney to a planar roof which forms an angle with respect to the horizontal, said simulated chimney having first and second spaced parallel side faces transversely connected by front and back faces and gravity responsive guide-members swingably mounted in overlying relation to the side faces for establishing a vertical plane therethrough, said front, back and side faces having coplanar upper margins, said method comprising supporting said chimney on said roof with its back face in facewise abutment therewith and the upper margin of said. back face presented horizontally above its lower margin, causing said guide-members to freely swing to the true vertical position thereby establishing a plane through said chimney presented at an angle to said back face which is equal to the angle the roof forms with the vertical, rigidly securing said guide-members to the side faces of said chimney when in said last-named position, establishing cut-lines along the side faces of the chimney where said plane intersects the side faces, severing the base of said chimney along the established cut-lines thereby forming a bottom face which intersects the back face at an angle equal to the angle said roof forms with the vertical, setting said chimney on the roof with the bottom face in facewise abutment therewith, positioning the chimney so that it attains an upright position, and rigidly securing said chimney to said roof in said last-named position.

11. The method of preparing and. affixing a simulated chimney to a roof which forms an angle with respect to the horizontal, said simulated chimney having first and second spaced parallel side faces perpendicularly intersected by front and back faces and gravity responsive guide-members swingably mounted in overlying relation to the side faces for establishing a vertical plane therethrough, said guide-members having straight edges and outwardly projecting flange-forming members, said front, back, and side faces having coplanar upper and lower margins, said method comprising support-ing said chimney on said roof with its back face in facewise abutment therewith and the upper margin of said back face presented horizontally above its lower margin, causing said guidemembers to freely swing to the true vertical position so that the straight edges thereof establish a plane through said chimney presented at an angle to said back face which is equal to the angle the roof forms with the vertical,

rigidly securing said guide-members to the side faces of said chimney when in said last-named position, establishing cut-lines along the side faces of the chimney where said plane intersects the side faces, severing the base of said chimney along the established cut-lines thereby forming a bottom face which intersects the back face at an angle equal to the angle said roof forms wit-h the vertical, setting said chimney on the roof with the bottom face in facewise abutment therewith, positioning the chimney so that it attains an upright position, applying an adhesive coating on the bottom face, applying an adhesive coating to the upper surface of the roof in the area to which the chimney is to be affixed, and placing said chimney in the coated .area of the roof and causing said chimney and flange-forming members to be permanently affixed to the roof upon curing of said adhesive.

12. The method of preparing and afiixing a simulated chimney to a roof having first and second planar roof surfaces which intersect in the formation of a ridge, said simulated chimney having first and second spaced parallel side faces perpendicularly intersected by front and. back faces and gravity responsive guide-members swingably mounted in overlying relation to the side faces for estab lishing vertical planes therethrough, said method comprising supporting said chimney on said roof with its front face in facewise abutment with the first roof section and so that its upper end points upwardly toward the ridge of the roof causing said first guide-members to freely swing to the true vertical position thereby establishing a first plane through said chimney, reversing the position of the chimney so that the back face lies in facewise engagement with the second roof surface and its upper end points towards the ridge of the roof causing the second guide-members to freely swing to a true vertical position thereby establishing a second plane through said chimney which intersects said first plane in the formation of a dihedral angle, rigidly securing said guide-members to the side faces of said chimney when in said last-named positions, severing the base of said chimney along the first and second planes thereby forming .a V-shaped bottom surface, setting said chimney on the roof in an upright position with the vertex of the dihedral angle in juxtaposition to the roof ridge and the V-shaped bottom surface in facewise engagement with the first roof surface, and rigidly securing said chimney to said roof in said last-named position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 360,332 3/1887 Twiname 52-745 1,035,379 8/1912 Miller 3389 1,255,761 2/1918 Lenkerd 53314 2,382,234 8/ 1945 Koch 523 14 2,717,454 9/1955 Sekki 33174 2,764,888 10/1956 Olson 52747 2,821,900 2/1958 Primich 98-58 X 3,089,521 5/1963 Paiement 52314 X OTHER REFERENCES Modern Plastics, April 1954, pages 143, 144, 146, 228- 230.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner. JACOB L. NACKENOFF, Examiner.

A. C. PERHAM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3638387 *Mar 10, 1970Feb 1, 1972Flangeklamp CorpMethod of erecting a wall panel supporting structure
US4069626 *Mar 26, 1976Jan 24, 1978Yarema Die & Engineering Co.Steeple
US5887406 *May 7, 1997Mar 30, 1999Bond; William R.Article support and tray for a pitched roof
US5937601 *Nov 21, 1997Aug 17, 1999Mcdonald; Robert L.Simulated brick chimney block
US5970668 *May 4, 1998Oct 26, 1999Arthurs; AllanChimney reinforcement device
US6715237 *May 7, 2002Apr 6, 2004Dennis J. Batt, Sr.Flashing assembly
US20100326488 *Jun 26, 2009Dec 30, 2010Robert AueSimulated photovoltaic module and array including same
USD740791 *Apr 18, 2014Oct 13, 2015Fuhu, Inc.Silicone speaker mounting accessory
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/57, 52/127.1, 52/746.12, 33/391, 52/314, 52/219, 33/370
International ClassificationE04F17/02, E04F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04F17/026
European ClassificationE04F17/02D