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Publication numberUS3282010 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1966
Filing dateDec 18, 1962
Priority dateDec 18, 1962
Publication numberUS 3282010 A, US 3282010A, US-A-3282010, US3282010 A, US3282010A
InventorsKing Jr Andrew J
Original AssigneeKing Jr Andrew J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Parquet flooring block
US 3282010 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1966 A. J. KING, JR 3,232,010

PARQUET FLOORING BLOCK Filed Dec. 18, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 2.

INVENTOR ATTORNE 1966 A. .1. KING, JR I 3,282,010

PARQUET FLOORING BLOCK Filed Dec. 18, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent Office 3,282,010 Patented Nov. 1, 1966 This application is a continuation-in-part of my application, Serial No. 131,166, now abandoned.

This invention relates broadly to the art of parquet flooring, and in its more specific aspects it relates to the construction of parquet blocks which are formed from a plurality of components or squares composed of slats; and the nature and objects of the invention will be readily recognized and understood by those skilled in the art to which it relates in the light of the following explanation and detailed description of the accompanying drawings illustrating what I at present believe to be the preferred embodiment or mechanical expressions of my invention from among various other forms, arrangements, combinations and constructions, of which the invention is capable within the spirit and scope thereof.

It is customary in the parquet flooring field to form the parquet blocks at the mill and ship them to the site of installation where they are individually laid or set in an adhesive which has been applied on the foundation upon which the floor is to be laid. The parquet blocks comprise squares which are integrated to form the block unit and each square is composed of a plurality of relatively narrow wooden slats. It will be understood that for shipment and to retain a mosaic or the like design, some means must be provided for holding the individual squares together to form the block unit and for holding the individual slats together to form the squares. This necessity for connecting the various components of a parquet block together so that they will maintain their desired relative unit forming positions during shipment and installation has been a problem which had not been satisfactorily solved by the parquet flooring industry prior to the invention disclosed in application Serial No. 81,414 filed January 9, 1961, now Patent No. 3,084,406.

It has been conventional practice in this art to assemble and correlate the slats which form the squares and the squares which form the block, in a squaring jig and then to apply by adhesive or the like a paper over one surface of the assembled block. It has also been proposed to adhesively apply a foil over one surface of the assembled block. With the components of the block in assembled condition and held in such condition, the block may be transported to the site of use and then laid.

Parquet flooring blocks which are maintained in assembled position during shipment and laying, by means of a sheet adhesively applied to a surface thereof, present a variety of problems to the installer and can result in an improperly laid parquet floor if great care is not exercised.

For instance, when a sheet maintaining means is used, moisture impregnation occurs from the adhesives and resins, and a retrack problem occurs, and this results in shrinkage of the block unit which, obviously, is undesirable from every standpoint.

In the laying operation of blocks having paper or the like maintaining sheets thereon, adhesive is applied over a section of the foundation and then the sheets on four or five blocks are dampened, whereupon the four or five blocks are laid in the adhesive with the sheet side up. It is then necessary to use a brush or sponge to again dampen the sheet and to then peel it off.

It will be appreciated that there will often be some displacement of the individual slats after removal of the paper and before the adhesive has set and this requires the installer to positionally adjust the individual slats to properly relate them in the block unit, and then the slats are seated by tapping them with a tapping block, rubber mallet or with the hands.

These operations are repeated for each section of flooring until the foundation is covered with the parquet flooring blocks.

It will be recognized that the use of paper or the like sheets to maintain the components of a parquet block in assembled relation produces substantial time losses not only in the production of the blocks, but also in the installation thereof, and also may, and often does, result in an imperfect installation.

In the aforesaid patent means are disclosed for maintaining the components of a parquet flooring block in assembled relation, which overcomes the above-mentioned, and other disadvantages which are inherent when a sheet is used which must be removed when the blocks are laid.

This invention provides substantial economies in time and expense in both the production and installation phases of the parquet flooring block by providing mechanical means for connecting the individual slats of a square together and for connecting the squares together to form the unitary parquet flooring block. The connecting or attaching means which I have evolved is applied with facility and eliminates the drying step heretofore necessary in the production of blocks having adhesive sheet means for maintaining the block components in assembled properly related position.

The mechanical connecting means by which I connect and correlate the components of the parquet flooring block together are of such character and so related to said components that the assembled block will withstand relatively rough handling in storage, shipment and installation, and such mechanical means is relatively inexpensive to produce and may be applied to the block components expeditiously.

One of the major drawbacks of the maintaining sheet of the prior art is that it must be dampened for removal during the laying operation which, among other factors, is costly in time. It has, therefore, been one of my prime purposes to devise means for maintaining block components in assembled condition which is a permanent part of the block and is laid with it and is at no time removed therefrom. This highly desirable result has been accomplished by me without in any way sacrificing economy, time, or sure and long-lasting connection of the block components.

The mechanical connecting means which I have devised requires no adhesives or the like, thus I have effectively eliminated the problem of moisture impregnation and its deleterious effects on the block.

As far as I am aware, parquet flooring of the type in which I am particularly interested is finished (i.e. sanded, polished, etc.) after it is laid, and not at the mill. It is believed that the reason for this resides in the fact that the sheet maintaining means previously used is of insufficient strength to withstand the displacing pressures applied to the block components during a finishing operation, and the sheet is applied on the top surface of the block which obviously prevents refinishing. The connecting means for the block components which I have developed is endowed with sufiicient strength to withstand such displacing pressures so that blocks may be finished at the mill where the blocks are produced and assembled. This is significant for many reasons: for instance, substantial economies may be effected by finishing at the mill rather than on the job, closer design results may be obtained and production line methods may be followed.

While the parquet flooring block disclosed in the aforesaid Patent No. 3,084,406 has proved to be satisfactory, I have devised certain improvements to said parquet flooring block which result in a unit having all of the 3 above-mentioned advantageous features and certain additional advantageous characteristics which increase the strength and usefulness of the block and provide for economies in the manufacture and installation thereof.

In the aforesaid patent the relatively narrow slats which form each square are connected together by means of a series of separate metallic staples and each square is connected to each adjacent square by means of a series of separate staples, the staples for connecting the slats together and for connecting the squares together being of the same type and of the same degree of flexibility.

In the improved form of parquet flooring block I fasten and connect adjacent squares together by means of a series of staples but the slats of each square are fastened together by means of wires which are embedded in grooves formed in the slats.

The wires or rods which I use to fasten together the slats of a square while having a degree of flexibility are of greater rigidity than the staples which are used for fastening adjacent squares together. Because of this particular combination of staples and wires functioning as a fastening means for the components of a parquet flooring block certain definite advantages are obtained over prior flooring blocks of which I am aware.

This new combination of fastening means substantially decreases the number of staples required to fasten adjacent squares together to form the block unit, which clearly provides economies in manufacture.

Substantial manufacturing economies are obtained due to the fact that the wires are embedded in the grooves by die pressing, and individual stapling operations are not required in those areas of the block where wires are used as the fastening means.

The structure of the improved parquet flooring block greatly facilitates the installing operation and improves the floor, for the wires firmly hold the slats together so that adhesive in which the blocks are laid may not penetrate between adjacent slats. The relatively rigid wire connecting means causes the lower edges of adjacent slats to be maintained in abutting relation to prevent penetration of the adhesive.

I have found that it is desirable that the block be capable of being arched or of producing a crown effect when it is being laid. This arching occurs due to the relative flexibility of the staples and permits each square to be slightly angled with respect to its adjacent squares. This is a significant feature of my invention for it allows the block to substantially conform to any unevenness in the surface upon which the block is being laid and it also tends to more firmly set the block in the adhesive when pressure is applied to the upper surface thereof in the laying operation.

By the use of this combination of staples and wires as the connecting means I am enabled to produce a block which prevents adhesive penetration between slats while permitting the block to have the above-discussed arching attribute. These highly desirable characteristics have been achieved without sacrificing substantial expedience and economies in manufacture.

The connecting means comprising the combination of staples and wires are inserted on the bottom or underside of the parquet flooring block and are not removed when the blocks are laid in the adhesive so that there can be no displacement of the slats or squares during the laying operation, or at any time; hence the installer need not individually set displaced slats. When a block has been laid, the installer merely rolls a roller over the block to insure proper setting of the components thereof.

Realizing that after years of use parquet floors may need refinishing, I have attached our connecting means on the underside of the blocks and spaced from the upper surface thereof to leave a depth of wood for refinishing purposes.

A further form of my invention embodies all of the advantageous features set forth above and in addition provides means on the major components of the block which strengthen it and maintain the major components in planar relation, that is the top surfaces of the major components of the block are maintained in the same plane to provide a smooth planar floor.

With the foregoing general objects, features and results in view, as well as certain others which will be apparent from the following explanation, the invention consists in certain novel features in design, construction, mounting and combination of elements, as will be more fully and particularly referred to and specified hereinafter.

Referring to the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a parquet flooring block illustrating the arched construction thereof prior to being laid.

FIG. 2 is a bottom plan view of the flooring block.

FIG. 3 is a view taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a prospective view of a further form of a parquet flooring block illustrating the arched construction thereof prior to being laid.

FIG. 5 is a prospective view of the major components of the flooring block in readiness to be assembled to provide a complete operative flooring block.

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of adjacent major components showing the action of the tongue and groove when there is relative movement between adjacent components.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view illustrating the position of the major components when the floor is laid and the tongue is inserted in the groove.

In the accompanying drawings, and particularly FIGS. 1 and 2 thereof, I have illustrated a parquet flooring block involving the improvements of this invention, and I have selected the numeral 1 to designate in its entirety a completed flooring block unit ready for installation. Each flooring block unit is composed of four major components or squares, which I have designated generally by the letters A, B, C and D. And will become apparent as this description proceeds, the squares A, B, C and D are fastened together in a novel manner and by a novel combination of means to form the completed flooring block unit 1.

The major components or squares A, B, C and D are each composed of a plurality of individual wooden slats or minor components 3 which are dimensionally equal, relatively thin and narrow. For instance, and merely by way of example, and not as a limitation, each slat 3 may be on the order of in thickness, 6%" long and 4; wide. The slats 3 may for purposes of description and for clarity be considered to be the minor components of my parquet flooring block 1.

In forming the squares or minor components of the parquet flooring block a number of slats 3 (the number being dependent upon the dimensions desired for the square) are positioned with the longitudinal edges of adjacent slats in abutting relation and with the ends of the slats in alignment. A pair of grooves 5 and 7 are then cut in the slats, one groove being adjacent to but inwardly spaced from each series of slat ends so that it will be apparent that each groove is cut transversely of each slat. It will also be apparent from consideration of the drawings that each groove extends through the longitudinal edges of the end slats of the square providing open-ended grooves. The grooves 5 and 7 are cut into the slats a limited distance in the undersides 9 thereof, leaving a depth of wood 11 (FIG. 3) between the bottoms of the grooves and the tops 13 of the slats.

Inserted in each groove 5 and 7 is a relatively rigid length of wire 15 which at each end extends to the longitudinal edge of the end slat. In other words, each wire 15 is substantially the same length as the groove in which it is inserted. The wires 15 are preferably formed with a smooth exterior and are of slightly greater diameter than the width of the groove so that when they are forced into the grooves, as by a die press, they will be held in position therein by a friction fit and there is no need to bend the wire ends for forcing into the bottom of the groove.

It will now be recognized that each square or major component A, B, C and D of each flooring block 1 is composed of a series of slats 3 which are held together in abutting relation by a pair of relatively rigid wires held by a friction fit in grooves 5 and 7 which are formed in any suitable manner in the undersides of the slats. It will be further appreciated that each groove extends transversely of the square and that one groove is formed adjacent to but inwardly spaced from one transverse edge of the square While the other groove is formed adjacent to but inwardly spaced from the other transverse edge of the square or major component of the flooring block.

When four of the squares have been formed and the slats thereof connected together by the wires, as described, the parquet flooring block may be made by bringing the four squares together so that one transverse edge of each block abuts against one longitudinal edge of an adjacent block. By associating the squares in this manner every abutting surface will consist of transverse slat edges in abuting relation with a longitudinal slat edge.

The squares A, B, C and D are connected together by means of metal staples designated generally by the numeral 17. Each staple comprises a bridging portion 19 from each end of which a prong 21 depends. The staples selected for this use have a degree of flexibility or malleability so that they will function in the desired manner and are of greater flexibility and are less rigid than wires 15 for reasons which will become apparent hereinafter.

I shall designate the center or apex of each flooring block 1 by the numeral 23, and I insert a staple 17 between the transverse end of innermost slat 25 of square C and across the longitudinal edge of innermost slat 27 of square B, and between the transverse end of slat 27 and across the longitudinal edge of innermost slat 29 of square A, and between the transverse end of slat 29 and across the longitudinal edge of innermost slat 31 of square D. Thus, I provide fastening means for every slat adjacent the apex 23 of the flooring block where the strains maybe substantial when the block is arched in the installation procedure, as illustrated in FIG. 1. I shall call the staples or connecting means which have just been described apex fastening means and I shall designate such staples by the reference numeral 33.

The abutting edges of the squares are further connected outwardly from the apex staples by further series of staples which extend from a transverse edge of a slat to and across the longitudinal edge of the next adjacent slat. There are four series of such staples which are designated by the letters E, F, G and H.

Because of the strength of the wires 15 it is not necessary that a staple be used at the transverse end of every slat. Alternate slats may, if desired, be stapled to the longitudinal edge of the next adjacent slat.

It will be understood that each apex staple 33 and each staple in the series of staples E, F, G and H is of the same construction as the staple 17 which is one of the staples in the E series of staples. It will also be understood that when the staples are inserted in the slats, the ends of the prongs 21 are spaced a substantial distance from the upper surface 13 of the slats.

Consideration of FIGS. 1 and 3 discloses the action of the combination of the fastening means comprising the relatively rigid wires and the relatively flexible staples. Since the wires are relatively rigid when the block is arched, as in FIG. 1, there will be substantially no relative movement between the slats 3 of a square so that there will be no separation between edges of adjacent slats and no adhesive penetration will occur. Since the staples are less rigid than the wires, the arching disclosed in FIG. 1 can occur because the staples will slightly bend to permit the squares to assume an angled relation with respect to one another to aid in the installation of the blocks. This angling of the squares with slight separation of the abutting edges thereof is shown at 35 in FIGS. 1 and 3. It will now be understood that the staples being somewhat flexible or bendable will act with a limited hinging action when the block is arched, while the wire connecting means will have no bending action.

In FIGS. 4-7 of the drawings I have illustrated a further form of my invention which embodies a tongue and groove construction between adjacent major components whereby the completed flooring block is strengthened and the major components of each block are maintained in planar relationship so that the top surfaces thereof are smooth and provide a sound floor.

In this form of my invention as in the form illustrated in FIGS. 1-3 of the drawings I have provided each major component with a plurality of slats 3 which are secured together by the pair of wires 15 and the major components are fastened together by means of the staples E, F, G and H.

Each slat 3 is provided along its transverse ends with a tongue 37 so that when the slats are secured together in final position by means of the rods 15 a continuous tongue 37 extends along opposite edges of the major component. Each end slat 3 of each major component is provided along .its longitudinal edge with a continuous groove 39 which, as will become apparent, is complementary to and adapted to receive the adjacent tongue 37.

When the final block is being built up the major components A, B, C and D are brought together with a grooved edge of one component opposite a tongued edge of the adjacent component and the tongues are inserted in the grooves whereupon the major components are fastened together by the staples E, F, G and H.

Consideration of the drawings and particularly FIGS. 6 and 7 thereof indicate that the grooves 39 are of greater depth than the thickness of the tongues 37 so that the relative movement between adjacent major components may occur to permit the highly desirable arched effect which is illustrated in FIG. 4 and which occurs during the laying of the flooring blocks.

It is preferable though not necessary to form the tongues 37 of beveled construction so that the outer end of the tongues is of less depth than the root thereof.

It will now be evident that I have provided in this form of my invention a flooring block which has added strength characteristics which do not prevent the much desired arching effect which has been fully explained in connection with the form of the invention disclosed in FIGS. l-3 of the drawings. It will further be apparent that by utilizing this tongue and groove construction I assure that the floor will present a smooth and co-planar upper surface.

I claim:

1. A flooring block including in combination, major components and minor components, and each major com ponent being composed of a plurality of minor components, and a flooring block being com-posed of a plurality of major components, said minor components being arranged in edge to edge series relation and having a pair of spaced apart transversely extending continuous slots formed in the under side thereof, said slots extending upwardly into each minor component to substantially the thickness centers thereof, and a wire of relative rigidity received in each slot and maintained therein solely by a tight friction fit to hold the minor components together, forming a major component, said plurality of major components being arranged together with certain of their edges in abutting relation, and a plurality of separate bendable means fixed to adjacent major components and extending across the abutting edges thereof to connect the major components together forming a flooring block, whereby said major components may assume different angular relationships with respect to each other, while said minor components of each major component are maintained in coplanar relationship.

2. A flooring block including in combination, major components and minor components, and each major com- 7 ponent being composed of a plurality of elongated minor components, and a flooring block being composed of a plurality of major components, said minor components being arranged in edge to edge series relation and having a pair of spaced apart transversely extending continuous slots formed in the under side thereof, said slots extending upwardly into each minor component to substantially the thickness center thereof, and a wire of relative rigidity received in each slot and maintained therein solely by a tight friction fit to hold the minor components together, forming a major component, said plurality of major components being arranged together with certain of their edges in abutting relation, and a plurality of separate bendable means fixed to adjacent major components and extending across the abutting edges thereof to connect the major components together forming a fioorin g block, and tongues extended from the transverse edges of said elongated minor components and a continuous groove on the longitudinal edge of each elongated minor component of each major component and the tongues being coactive with the grooves to maintain adjacent flooring blocks in co-planar relation, and each tongue having a root portion mating with the groove and having a forward portion, said forward portion being of reduced thickness relative to said root portion and to the depth of the groove, whereby relative tilting movement between adjacent major components may occur.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,869,702 8/1932 MacChesney 52586 1,925,070 8/1933 Livezey 52--747 2,117,198 5/1938 Me-gee 52-506 2,222,137 11/1940 Bruce 52-364 2,252,430 8/1941 Klammt 52578 2,341,645 2/1944 Muench 52601 X 3,084,406 4/1963 King et al 52578 FOREIGN PATENTS 141,321 5/1951 Australia. 1,152,578 2/1958 France.

275,527 8/ 1951 Switzerland.

276,955 11/1951 Switzerland.

277,907 12/ 1951 Switzerland.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

EARL I. WITMER, Examiner.

R. A. STENZEL, Assistant Examiner.

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US8590253May 24, 2010Nov 26, 2013Valinge Innovation AbLocking system for floorboards
US8613826Sep 13, 2012Dec 24, 2013Valinge Innovation AbFloorboard, system and method for forming a flooring, and a flooring formed thereof
US8615955May 24, 2012Dec 31, 2013Valinge Innovation AbLocking system, floorboard comprising such a locking system, as well as method for making floorboards
US8683698Mar 11, 2011Apr 1, 2014Valinge Innovation AbMethod for making floorboards with decorative grooves
US8733065Mar 21, 2012May 27, 2014Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US8733410Mar 5, 2008May 27, 2014Valinge Innovation AbMethod of separating a floorboard material
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/391, 52/390, 52/313, 52/392
International ClassificationE04F15/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04F2201/0511, E04F15/04
European ClassificationE04F15/04