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Publication numberUS3282071 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1966
Filing dateJan 20, 1966
Priority dateMar 23, 1964
Publication numberUS 3282071 A, US 3282071A, US-A-3282071, US3282071 A, US3282071A
InventorsLawrence R Goodman, Ronald H Marks
Original AssigneeAmerican Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fabric
US 3282071 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1966 Original Filed March 23, 1964 R. H. MARKS ET AL FABRIC 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 7 f 1. ATTU/FNE m Nov. 1, 1966 R. H. MARKS ET AL FABRIC 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Original Filed March 23, 1964 Hana/a 16. Mark:

v INVENTORS ,Z W 77 m d 0 0 6 n P c n e W W a Z Nov. 1, 1966 R. H. MARKS ET AL 3,282,071

FABRIC Original Filed March 25, 19 4 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 [ow/6w: e /P. 600 o mcm INVENTOBS ATTORNEVJ United States Patent 6 Claims. '(Cl. 66-469) The present invention relates to a new fabric and to the method and apparatus for producing such fabric.

This application is a division of our co-pending application Serial No. 354,023, filed March 23, 1964.

Knitted fabrics have been quite common for many years. Generally such fabrics are produced on knitting machines in which a plurality of yarn strands are fed into the knitting machine and intermingled by needles which alternately engage and then release a strand of yarn by pulling the engaged strand through the loop of the previously engaged strand to release the previously engaged strand. Prior to the present invention a plurality of yarn strands have been knitted but no machine has been used for receiving a plurality of strips of material and a plurality of yarn strands to be knitted into a fabric having the strips integrated in the fabric in the form of a pile or continuous strip extending on one side of the fabric.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to produce such a fabric.

Another object is to provide a method and an apparatus for producing a fabric from a plurality of yarn strands and a plurality of material strips.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method and an apparatus for producing a fabric from a plurality of yarn strands and a plurality of strips derived from a roll of material.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a method and an apparatus for producing a fabric in which a plurality of yarn strands and a plurality of strips are integrated by knitting.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a method and an apparatus for producing a fabric by integrating a plurality of yarn strands and a plurality of strips while such strips remain connected to the roll of material from which they are derived.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a method and an apparatus for producing a fabric having piling composed of strips of material, one edge of which has been combined with knitted yarn.

Another object is to provide a fabric having a plurality of twisted paper yarn interknit with a plurality of paper strips.

Still a further object is to provide a method and an apparatus to produce a fabric from a plurality of twisted paper yarn and a plurality of paper strips in with the paper strips to form a pile or continuous strip on one side of the fabric and have portions of one of their edges gathered in the needle loops formed by the knitting of the paper yarn.

These and other objects of the present invention are more fully explained and described in reference to the drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic elevation view of an apparatus constructed to perform the method of the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a partial detail view of the action of knitting needles on a yarn strand and a strip.

FIGURE 3 is a view of a small piece of fabric made in accordance with the method of the present invention.

3,282,071 Patented Nov. 1, 1966 ice FIGURE 4 is a schematic perspective view of the interior of a knitting machine illustrating the fabric being formed in relation to the needles and sinkers of the machine.

FIGURE 5 is a typical sectional view of a knitting machine illustrating the relative position of the knitting needles, their actuating mechanisms, the sinkers and the yarn and strips being fed into the knitting machine.

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of the combination yarn and strip feeding mechanism and its relationship to needles of a knitting machine.

Knitting machine 1, as shown in FIGURE 1, is shown to be a rotating cylinder-type knitting machine. In this type of knitting machine cylinder 2 on which fabric 3 is wound rotates as do the knitting needles while spindles 4 which supply yarn strands 5 remain stationary. As fabric 3 is produced by knitting machine 1, it is wound on cylinder 2.

Strips 6 are delivered to knitting machine 1 by strip guide 7 of any suitable form. In FIGURE 1 strip guide 7 is shown in the form of a spreading comb but may be of any combination of guides or eyes to deliver the strips 6 to the proper position on knitting machine 1.

In one form of the invention strips 6 originate in paper roll 8 which is suitably mounted on frame 9. Web 10 or continuous sheet is withdrawn from roll 8 by tension adjuster 11 and is delivered to cutter 12 wherein web 10 is cut into strips 6 without severing the connection of strips 6 to web 10. Strips 6 from cutter 12 pass over drum 13 and are delivered through strip guides 7 to knitting machine 1. Drum 13 is generally used to maintain tension in web 10 and strips 6 on either side.

of cutter 12 is provided with sheave 16 which is connected and sheaves provides the power for cutter 12. Shaft 15 of cutter 12 is provided With sheave 16 which is connected by belt 17 and sheave 18'to variable speed transmission means 19. The output rotation of variable speed transmission means 19 is transmitted by belt 20 to sheave 21 to rotate tension adjuster 11. Sheave 22 is connected to shaft 23 on cutter 12 by belt 24 to rotate drum 13.

In FIGURE 2 the engagement of strips 6 is illustrated in relation to the yarn strand 5 being engaged by needles 25 and showing a standard knitted fabric 26 which does not include strips 6 for the purpose of clarity. As shown in FIGURE 2the movement of needles 25, strip 6, yarn strand 5 and fabric 26 will be from left to right. Needle 25a has just engaged yarn strand 5 in its open hook end and is extending through needle loop 27a. It should be noted that latch 28a on needle 25a is fully open and has moved above loop 27a. Needle 25b has previously engaged yarn strand 5 and has commenced its downward movement. Latch 28b of needle 2512 has been partially closed by engaging loop 271). The hook end of needle 25b is poised immediately above the edge of strip 6. Needle 250 has moved down further than needle 25b and has caught the edge of strip 6 and pulled it and yarn strand 5 through loop 270 and its latch 28c has been closed to prevent the dropping of a stitch. When needle 250 has completed its downward motion, it will again move up, it latch will open and it will be pushed up through the loop which it has just formed and extend upwardly behind strip 6 for engagement with the next yarn strand 5 and striy 6.

FIGURE 3 illustrates the piled fabric produced by the knitting of yarn strand 5 with strips 6, showing how that portion of one edge of strip 6 is gathered in the needle loops formed from yarn strands 5.

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 but illustrates the relationship of sinkers 30 to needles 25 and strip 6. Slots 31 in the upper portion of sinkers 30 engage 3 the fabric to form the sinker loops as in other knitting machines.

As best seen in FIGURE 5, sinkers 30 move inward and outward in guide slots 32 in plate 33 and are actuated by horizontal cam 34. Needles 25 move up and down in slot 35 in rotating cylinder 36 of knitting machine 1 and are actuated by cam 37 and follower 38 which remain stationary while cylinder 36, needles 25, plate 33, and sinkers 30 rotate.

Strip and yarn guide frame 39 is secured to a stationary portion 40 of knitting machine 1 as shown in FIGURE 6. Shaft 41 extends through the upper portion of frame 39 and is held in position by set screw 42. Bracket 43 is fastened on shaft 41 by set screw 44 and is secured to strip guide to provide support and positioning of strip guide 45. Yarn guide 46 is secured to the lower end of shaft 41 to deliver yarn to the needles as shown. Strip guide 45 is channel shaped and provided with U- shaped tensioner 47. Tensioner 47 has one of its legs positioned within strip guide 45 by cross member 48 and will have a slight drag on the movement of strip 6 through the space between the web of strip guide 45 and the leg of tensioner 47. This drag on strip 6 will cause a slight tension in the strip, and movement of strip 6 into the fabric 3 will be effected by the pull of the needles as they engage the edge of strip 6 pulling it into the needle loops.

In operation the apparatus of the present invention may be set up as shown in FIGURE 1 whereby yarn strands 5 are supplied to the knitting machine 1 from the spindles 4, and the strips 6 are supplied from the roll 8 through the cutter 12 to knitting machine 1. As hereinbefore mentioned, the yarn strands 5 may be of any suitable material depending upon the fabric which is to be produced, such as twisted paper, paper strips capable of being knitted, cotton or other suitable yarn. The strips 6 will also be selected on the basis of the fabric that is to be produced. In FIGURE 1 the strips 6 are illustrated to be cut from a roll 8 of material which is to be fed to knitting machine 1. A typical example of a suitable material is paper. Any other material may be used which can be engaged by the needle hooks and an edge portion pulled in gathered form into the needle loop and which allows the needle to release from the strip, either by tearing out of the edge of the strip or by passing downwardly through the hole in the strip made by the engagement thereof by the needle hook. If desired in the fabric being produced, a relatively thin plastic material may be used, provided it has such properties as will allow it to be engaged within the needle loops formed by the knitting of the yarn strands without interfering with the subsequent knitting by the needles.

As seen in FIGURE 2, as the edge of the strip 6 is gathered into the needle loops 27, the strip 6 will twist to the extent that the opposite edge will be lower than the gathered edge in the final product.

The feeding of the strips 6 to the knitting needles, as shown in FIGURE 6, utilizes the movement of the fabric already completed and the movement of the knitting needles to pull the strips 6 into position against the tension created by the tensioner 47. Strip guide 45 is positioned to receive strips 6 and deliver strips 6 in position below yarn strands 5 with one edge just under the hooks of the knitting needles 25.

From the foregoing it can be seen that a new fabric has been produced which may be described as having a knit backing with a plurality of strips each having small portions on each edge gathered into the needle loops along a course of the backing. As used in this description, the word course is used to mean one row of knitting formed by a single yarn strand.

Also, the method used in forming this fabric, wherein edge portions of strips are gathered into the needle loops by feeding the strips into position to have an edge under the needle hooks, and the apparatus used for such method, wherein the strips are provided and delivered under proper tension to the proper position, have been shown in the drawings and described in reference thereto.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention is illustrative and explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A new fabric comprising:

a backing of knit material, and

a plurality of strips of material, each of said strips having small portions of one edge gathered into the needle loops of one course of said backing and the other edge free.

2. A new fabric according to claim 1 wherein:

said strips are parallel and have sutficient width to overlap the next adjacent strip to provide an overlay structure.

3. A new fabric comprising:

a structure of knit material, and

a plurality of strips of material, said plurality of strips forming an overlay structure by gathering small portions of one edge of each of said plurality of strips into needle loops of said knitted structure whereby said strips are integrated into said knitted structure as an overlay of gathered ruffles.

4. A new fabric according to claim 3 wherein:

one of said strips is integrated into each course of said knitted structure.

5. A new fabric according to claim 3 wherein:

said strips are integrated into parallel courses of said knitted structure.

6. A new fabric having an appearance of overlying mfiles on one side and a knit with small tufts in the needle loops on the other side comprising:

a knitted structure formed by knitting a plurality of elements, and

an overlay structure formed by gathering small portions of one edge of each of a plurality of strips into needle loops whereby said strips are integrated into said knitted structure and form an overlay on such knitted structure of gathered rufiles.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,501,857 7/1924 List 6685 1,671,835 5/1928 Muller 66-193 MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner. R. FELDBAUM, Assislant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1501857 *Jun 20, 1923Jul 15, 1924Goodman Bros & HinleinBraid-knitting machine
US1671835 *Sep 17, 1926May 29, 1928Hensel Silk Mfg CompanyDecorated bullion fringe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3507130 *Dec 4, 1967Apr 21, 1970Inc EnterpriseMethod and apparatus for knitting fabrics
US3943733 *Apr 24, 1974Mar 16, 1976Rockwell International CorporationMethod and apparatus for producing a knitted fabric interlaced with insert elements
US4060999 *Nov 5, 1974Dec 6, 1977Enterprise IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for forming yarn elements and producing products therefrom
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/169.00R, 66/202
International ClassificationD04B35/22
Cooperative ClassificationD04B35/22
European ClassificationD04B35/22