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Publication numberUS3282598 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1966
Filing dateAug 27, 1964
Priority dateAug 27, 1964
Publication numberUS 3282598 A, US 3282598A, US-A-3282598, US3282598 A, US3282598A
InventorsCharles W Goodwin
Original AssigneeCharles W Goodwin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Land skier
US 3282598 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1966 c. w. GOODWIN 3,282,598

LAND SKIER Filed Aug. 27, 1964 INVENTOR.

I E'htLPlE E 1:: En: dwln.

United States Patent G 3,282,598 LAND SKIER Charles W. Goodwin, Box 34, Charlemont, Mass. Filed Aug. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 392,487 2 Claims. (Cl. 280-112) slopes are being operated with artificial snow, where the weather is proper, at great expense.

It is a purpose of the within invention to provide a device for permitting dry-land skiing on winter slopes during the warm summer months.

It is a primary object of the within invention to provide a dry-land skier that permits maneuverability.

It is another object of the within invention to provide a skier that permits the user to employ the skills that he would normally employ with winter skiing.

It is still an additional object of this invention to provide a summer skier that is low in the cost of manufacture.

It is yet an additional object of the within invention to provide a summer skier that is simple in construction and yet durable.

These and other objects are obtained by the use of specially-shaped rollers, a plurality of which are mounted between frame members that are in horizontal as well as angular planes, and a drag shoe for controlling speed.

The various objects and features of this invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of a typical, preferred embodiment and application of the invention, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a top perspective view of the skier.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the skier.

FIGURE 3 is a front elevational view of one of the typical rollers.

FIGURE 4 is a top elevational view of a portion of the skier above the drag shoe.

The skiing device has two side rails 1. A plurality of rollers 3 are mounted between the rails 1 as shown in the various figures of the drawing. The rollers have a central opening through which is mounted a free-moving shaft 6a which is threaded at each end and attached to the nuts 6. A washer 6b is located between the rail 1 and the nut 6 for locking the nut 6. Mounted at the rear end of the skier is a drag shoe 2. The drag shoe 2 is mounted on the screws 7. The drag shoe 2 is located between the two rails 1 at the rear of the rollers 3. Connected above the rollers and between the rails 1 is the shoe plate 4. The shoe plate 4 is connected by screws or other fastening means to the rails 1 at the top thereof. There are eyes which are secured to the shoe plate 4. Shoe plate 4 is connected by screws or other fastening means to the rails 1 at the top thereof. Eyes 5 which are secured to the shoe plate 4 are for the purpose of connecting straps or other fastening means for placing the skhers shoe securely in position on the skier device atop shoe plate 4.

Of extreme importance in the design of the device are the planes of the various parts. There is the plane 8 of the front rollers. It is noted that the front portion of the rails 1 have an upswing. The rollers 3a at the front follow the plane 8 of the upswing. There is a horizontal flat plane 9 which is the plane beneath the foot plate 4. To the rear of plane 9 is the plane 10 of the drag shoe 2. The plane 10 of drag shoe 2 is longer and not quite as Patented Nov. 1, 1966 steep as plane 8 and, as can be seen in FIGURE 3, runs upwardly to the rear instead of upwardly .to the front (the plane 8 runs upwardly and forward).

The rollers 3 have two separate planes. The center of the roller is much larger in cross-section (larger diameter) than the ends of the roller 3 as can be seen in the views of FIGURE 3 and FIGURE 4. In the view of FIGURE 3, the plane to the right of the rollers is indicated by the numeral 11 while the plane to the left of the roller is indicated by the numeral 12. The horizontal plane 9 is shown just beneath 11 and 12. The dotted lines between the planes in FIGURE 3 show the approximate angle of the rollers from their center as determined by a horizontal plane.

The rollers 3 and 3a are similar. The rollers 3a are the rollers in plane 8, while the rollers 3 are the rollers in the horizontal plane 9. The rollers 3 and the rollers 3a are similar in structure.

In the view of FIGURE 4 the support of a typical roller 3 (or 3a) is shown. The shaft or axle 6a which passes through '3 is shown in FIGURE 4. The washer 6b is between the frame 1 and the nut 6.

It is contemplated that the shaft 6a could be a sleeve or bearing which does not pass through the roller 3. The roller 3 would then spin within the openings in the frame 1 at the same time that the bearings or pins would spin. The rollers 3 and 3a must be easily rotatable.

The device may be made from strong wood, aluminum, or other similar metal, synthetic plastic or a material that is strong and will stand up under abuse without departing from the spirit of the invention. On an assembly basis the parts could be manufactured from molds and jigs.

In operation, the skier applies the ski device to his shoe by placing his foot on the plane 4. Straps are passed through the eyes 5 over the shoe to secure the shoe or ski foot to the device. When each shoe has been secured to the device, the skier is ready to ski on dry land. It is to be noted in the previous description that there are five planes in the device, four inclined and one horizontal. When the skier presses his weight forward, the center of gravity is on the fiat horizontal plane 9. In the embodiment shown, this plane 9 consists of six free-wheeling rollers '3. Forward of plane 9 as already stated is the inclined plane 8. The purpose of plane 8 is to permit deflection for any ground irregularities, stones, or other objects. The inclined plane 10 to the rear of the rollers 3 gives the drag shoe 2 sufficient clearance 'while the users weight is pressed forward. However, when the users weight is shifted to the rear of the device, the center of gravity is taken from the rollers 3 and plane 9 and placed upon the drag shoe 2. This change of gravity has the effect of giving a stabilizing effect for slowing down, turning, or stopping. There is an analogy between plane 9 and plane 10. Water Skiing is a good example. The rollers 3 and 3a allow for ample speed to be obtained. When sufficient speed is attained, the user will then throw his weight to the rear of the device so that the drag shoe 2 will come into play. The drag shoe 2 itself will then act with amazing effect as a ski when there is a fair degree of fall line. The motion forward has been discussed. However, in skiing there is required maneuverability to the side, which is known as lateral movement. The shape of the planes 11 and 12 on the rollers 3 allows lateral movement of the device. The inclined angles of these planes also permit almost friction-free rolling with no edge or irregularities to catch or throw the skiers leg. The lateral angle of the rollers 3 and 3a, which is controlled by the inclined planes 11 and 12, permits the skier to make a sharp turn either to the right or left at a fair rate of speed without being thrown. Similar to real skiing, the skier throws his weight to either the right or left side.

Certain dimensions in the drawing have been exaggerated and a 'change in size or shape would be within the spirit and scope of this invention.

In consideration of the foregoing disclosure I claim.

1. Aland skier having two parallel rails, a plurality of rotating devices connected between the said rails, said Intating devices having their bottom surfaces extending below the bottom of said rails, the bottom of said rails having an upward plane in the front and an upward extending plane to the rear with a horizontal plane therebetween, said rotating devices at the front of the. said rails being in the upwardly extending plane, a braking device for controlling speed being located between the rear of the rails andextending below the lower surface of the rails, and a plate for securing said rails together and supporting a user.

2. A land skier having two parallel rails, a plurality of rollers connected between said rails, means whereby said rollers are rotatable between said rails, said rollers having a larger diameter cross-section in the middle thereof and tapering symmetrically in conical shape towards each end thereof, said rollers having their bottom surfaces extending below the bottom of the said rails, the bottom of said rails having an upward plane in the front and an upward extending plane to the rear with a horizontal plane therebetween, said rollers at the front of said rails being in the upwardly extending plane, a braking device connected at the rear of said rails for controlling the speed of the skier, said braking device extending below the bottom of the lower surface of the rear of said rails, and a plate for securing said rails together and supporting a user.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,428,210 9/1922 Boche 280-4122 2,048,916 7/1936 Bentz-lin 280-1122 2,253,012 8/1941 Benner et al 28011.l

FOREIGN PATENTS 681,773 9/1939 Germany.

BENJAMIN HERSH, Primaiy Examiner.

MILTON L. SMITH, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1428210 *May 25, 1921Sep 5, 1922Boche Otto WRoller skate and wheel therefor
US2048916 *May 25, 1935Jul 28, 1936Frank A BentzlinRoller skate
US2253012 *Feb 17, 1940Aug 19, 1941Dale A BennerSki-skate
DE681773C *Jan 4, 1938Sep 30, 1939Willy ReinbeckRollschuh mit tonnenfoermig gestalteten Rollkoerpern
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3512796 *May 27, 1968May 19, 1970Donald J MangusRoller skiis
US3622172 *Apr 9, 1970Nov 23, 1971Turf Ski IncTorsion land skier
US3923316 *Dec 27, 1973Dec 2, 1975Bruce H BirnbaumGrass-ski
US4844492 *Mar 28, 1988Jul 4, 1989Ludwig Edward ETwo wheeled roller skate
US5419570 *Jul 19, 1993May 30, 1995Bollotte ; Guy O.Skateboard having singular in line wheels
US5549331 *Jul 10, 1995Aug 27, 1996Yun; Young W.Inline skateboard
US5601299 *Apr 3, 1996Feb 11, 1997Yun; Young W.Inline skateboard
US6019382 *Sep 4, 1998Feb 1, 2000Bouden; James D.Configurable wheel truck for skateboards or roller skates incorporating novel wheel designs
US6132006 *Jul 15, 1998Oct 17, 2000Post; Peter G.In-line skate wheel axle assembly and frame
US6254113 *Feb 25, 1999Jul 3, 2001Mark DornanAll terrain riding assembly
US6267394Jan 31, 2000Jul 31, 2001James D. BoudenConfigurable wheel truck for skateboards or roller skates incorporating novel wheel designs
US6290242 *Sep 26, 2000Sep 18, 2001Edward Eugene LudwigDouble-action inline skate with wheel surface shaped for maneuverability
US6375204 *Jan 22, 2001Apr 23, 2002Wen-Wu TuPitching skate board
US6722674 *Jul 18, 2001Apr 20, 2004Hong Jiun GuSafety driving equipment for scooter
US7059613 *Jul 11, 2003Jun 13, 2006Freeline Skates Inc.Personal transportation device for supporting a user's foot having multiple transportation attachments
US7854435 *Oct 3, 2006Dec 21, 2010Colin Alan CampbellWheel mechanism
US8308171Aug 5, 2009Nov 13, 2012Ryan FarrellyPersonal transportation device for supporting a user's foot having multiple transportation attachments
US8752846 *Dec 11, 2012Jun 17, 2014Cascade CorporationRoller load support
US8863868Nov 11, 2010Oct 21, 2014Colin Alan CampbellWheel mechanism
US9216796 *Jun 11, 2010Dec 22, 2015Stamatios V. KartalopoulosSelf-balancing multifunctional wheelbarrow
US20050006859 *Jul 11, 2003Jan 13, 2005Ryan FarrellyPersonal transportation device for supporting a user's foot having multiple transportation attachments
US20070080511 *Oct 3, 2006Apr 12, 2007Campbell Colin AWheel Mechanism
US20090174163 *Jan 8, 2009Jul 9, 2009Freeline Sports, Inc.Personal transportation device for supporting a user's foot
US20100090423 *May 13, 2009Apr 15, 2010Freeline Sports, Inc.Personal transportation device for supporting a user's foot
US20100092806 *Jan 7, 2009Apr 15, 2010Honeywell International Inc.Miniature powered antenna for wireless communications and related system and method
US20100176565 *Aug 5, 2009Jul 15, 2010Freeline Sports, Inc.Personal transportation device for supporting a user's foot having multiple transportation attachments
US20110057421 *Nov 11, 2010Mar 10, 2011Colin Alan CampbellWheel mechanism
US20120091674 *Jun 11, 2010Apr 19, 2012Kartalopoulos Stamatios VSelf-balancing multifunctional wheelbarrow
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.208, 280/11.227
International ClassificationA63C5/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63C5/035
European ClassificationA63C5/035