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Publication numberUS3283997 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1966
Filing dateMay 14, 1965
Priority dateMay 14, 1965
Publication numberUS 3283997 A, US 3283997A, US-A-3283997, US3283997 A, US3283997A
InventorsBambenek Robert A, Rollo Jr Edward J
Original AssigneeGen Am Transport
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable ventilators
US 3283997 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 8, 1966 R. A. BAMBENEK ETAL 3,283,997

PORTABLE VENTILATORS Filed May 14, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 ROBERT A. BAMBENEK EDWARD J. ROLLO JR.

4 W ATTYS.

Nov. 8, 1966 R. A, BA\MVBENEK ETAL 3,283,997

PORTABLE VENTILATORS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 14, 1965 NOV. 8, 1966 Filed May 14, 1965 FIG.5

R. A. BAMBENEK ETAL PORTABLE VENTILATORS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Nov. 8; 1966 B K ETAL 3,283,997

PORTABLE VENTILATORS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 14, 1965 United States Patent "ice 3,283,997 PORTABLE VENTILATORS Robert A. Bambenek, Glenview, and Edward J. Rollo, In,

Des Plaines. Ill., assignors to General American Transportation Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of New York Filed May 14, 1965, Ser. No. 455,694 7 Claims. (Cl. 230-215) The present invention relates to portable ventilators, and more particularly to such ventilators of simple and economical construction and arrangement that may be readily and quickly assembled and put in use for the purpose of supplying fresh air to the space in a shelter, or the like.

It is a general object of the invention to provide a ventilator of the character noted, wherein the casing of the ventilator serves to define a storage chamber for the elements of the ventilator when the same is not in use, and wherein the storage chamber mentioned serves as a plenum chamber for the ventilator when the same is in use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a ventilator of the character noted that incorporates an impeller that is rotatable to effect pumping of the air through the casing thereof, together with both manually operable facility and motor operable facility for rotating the impeller, wherein the two facilities for operating the impeller are independent of each other.

A further object of the invention is to provide a ventilator of the character described, wherein the motor operable facility mentioned essentially comprises an electric motor operably connected to the impeller, and wherein the manually operable facility mentioned essentially comprises a frame carrying-pedal-operated mechanism operably connected to the impeller.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a ventilator of the character described, wherein the electric motor mentioned is housed in the casing of the'ventilator, and wherein the frame mentioned is of the knockdown type having an erected position disposed exteriorly of the casing of the ventilator and a storage position disposed interiorly of the casing of the ventilator.

Further features of the invention pertain to the particular construction and arrangement of the elements of the portable ventilator, whereby the above-outlined and additional operating features thereof are attained.

The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, will best be under-stood by reference to the following specification, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a front perspective view of a portable ventilator, embodying the present invention, all of the elements of the ventilator being housed within the boxlike casing thereof that constitutes a shipping carton therefor;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged plan view of the ventilator illustrating the manually operable facility for driving the fan housed in the casing of the ventilator, after this facility has been unpacked from the casing and erected thereupon for use;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged combination side elevational and sectional view of the ventilator, this view being taken in the direction of the arrows along the offset line 33 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary plan view of the rear portion of the ventilator as shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged exploded side elevational view of the manually operable facility for driving the fan incorporated in the ventilator, and illustrating the unitary character of this facility;

3,283,997 Patented Nov. 8, 1966 FIG. 6 is an enlarged plan view, partly broken away, of the casing mentioned;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged side elevational view, partly broken away, of the casing mentioned; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged end view, partly broken away, of the casing mentioned.

Referring now to the drawings, the portable ventilator 10 there illustrated, and embodying the features of the present invention, comprises a casing 11 that constitutes a shipping'carton and housing for all of the elements of the ventilator, when the same is being transported from place to place and when the same is not in use. The ventilator 10 is particularly advantageous for emergency use to supply fresh air to a shelter, or other confined space, in the event of failure of the normal ventilating arrangement for the shelter. Thus, the ventilator 10 is of light-weight and simple construction and. arrangement, and the elements thereof may be readily and quickly assembled for use, without special tools. Moreover, the casing 11 is of compact box-like form. Specifically, the casing 11 comprises a top wall 12, a bottom wall 13, two side walls 14 and 15, and two end walls 16 and 17. In the arrangement, the casing 11 may have the dimension: 38.6" long, 18.7" wide and 25.0" high; whereby the ventilator 10 is of compact construction when all of the elements thereof are housed in the casing 11. The individual walls 12 to 17, inclusive, may be formed. of conventional corrugated fiber board construction, each wall 12, etc., being of paper-like character and including smooth inner and outer sheets intimately bonded to an intermediate sinuous or corrugated sheet. The details of the walls 12, etc., have not been illustrated, since the same are entirely conventional in the corrugated fiber board box manufacturing art.

Further, the casing 11 is suitably reinforced by a plurality of wooden framing members suitably secured, as by gluing, to the adjacent ones of the walls 12, etc., the framing members mentioned being arranged interiorly of the casing 11, as explained more fully below. Specifically, two elongated framing members 21 and 22 are respectively glued in place at the two junctions of the top wall 12 with the side walls 14 and 15; and two elongated framing members 23 and 24 are respectively glued in place at the two junctions of the bottom wall 13 with the side walls 14 and 15. Three laterally extending framing members 31, 32 and 33 are arranged in longitudinally spaced-apart relation and glued to the adjacent interior surface of the top wall 12; three laterally extending framing members 34, 35 and 36 are arranged in longitudinally spaced-apart relation and glued to the adjacent interior surface of the bottom wall 13; three upstanding framing members 41, 42 and 43 are arranged in longitudinally spaced-apart relation and glued to the adjacent'interior surface of the side wall 14; and three upstanding framing members 42, 45 and 46 are arranged in longitudinally spaced-apart relation and glued to the adjacent interior surface of the side wall 15. The opposite ends of the members 31, 32 and 32 are suitably secured to the members 21 and 22; the opposite ends of the members 34, 35 and 36 are suitably secured to the members 23 and 24; the opposite ends of the members 41, 42 and 43 are suitably secured to the members 21 and 23; and the opposite ends of the members 44, 45 and 46 are suitably secured to the members 22 and 24. The members 31, 44, 34 and 41 provide a first rigid rectangular structure within the casing 11; the members 32, 45, 35 and 42 provide a second rigid rectangular structure within the casing 11; and the members 33, 46, 36 and 43 provide a third rigid rectangular structure within the casing 11. Of course, the members 21, 22, 23 and 24 restrain the three structures described in longitudinally spaced-apart relation, as clearly shown in FIGS. 6 and 7.

The first rectangular structure defined by the members 31, 44, 34 and 41 is arranged adjacent to the end wall 16; and this first rectangular structure has secured thereto an upstanding rectangular board 51 formed of plywood, or the like; which board 51 has a centrally disposed opening 52 formed therethrough; and which board 51 divides the'interior of the casing 11 into a small chamber 53 disposed adjacent to the end Wall 16 and a large chamber 54 disposed adjacent to the end wall 17. The board 51 carries a short annular duct 55 disposed in surrounding relation with the opening 52 and positioned in the chamber 53. Also, the board 51 carries a supporting ring 56 disposed in concentric relation with the opening 52 and positioned in the chamber 54. The ring 56 is arranged adjacent to the board 51 and supported by an open cagelike structure 57 formed essentially of wire, as best shown in FIG. 8.

The board 51 carries an electric motor 61 that is provided with a housing 62 supporting a rotatable operating shaft 63, one end of the housing 62 being directly secured to the ring 56. The adjacent one end of the operating shaft 63 projects from the housing 62 into the opening 52 and carries a multi-bladed fan 64 positioned within the opening 52, as best shown in FIG. 3. The opposite end of the operating shaft 63 projects from the housing 62 and carries a pulley 65 disposed longitudinally intermediate the two upstanding members 42 and 43, as best shown in FIG. 4.

The ventilator further comprises a manually operable unit 70 that is normally packaged in the chamber 54 in the casing 11, when the ventilator 10 is not in use; which unit 70 is somewhat similar to the frame of a bicycle. In any case, when the ventilator 10 is to be put in use, the end wall 17 of the casing 11 is opened and the unit 70 is removed from the chamber 54; and the end wall 17 is again sealed to close the adjacent end of the chamber 54. The elements of the unit 70 are normally stored in the chamber 54 in a knocked-down condition; whereby the same are then assembled upon the side wall 14 of the casing 11.

Referring now to FIGS. 2, 3, 4 and 5, the unit 70 is of the knock-down type, as previously note-d; whereby the same comprises handle-bar structure 71, a seat 72, front stand structure 73 carrying the handle-bar structure 71 and the seat 72, and a pedal-operated sprocket wheel 74. Also, the front stand structure 73 carries rear stand structure 75 that carries a rotatably mounted pulley 76. The sprocket wheel 74 is operatively connected by a cooperating sprocket chain 77 to the pulley 76 via a coaster mechanism 78. The extreme rear end of the rear stand structure 75 terminates in a pair of longitudinally spaced-apart members 79 that are adapted to be received in a pair of cooperating tubes 81 that are secured to a plate 82; which plate 82 extends longitudinally between the two upstanding members 42 and 43 and is detachably secured thereto by cooperating removable fasteners 83. Further, the two pulleys 65 and 76 are interconnected by a flexible belt 84, the two pulleys 65 and 76 being of the V-type. Of course, the belt 84 extends through an upstanding slot 14a formed in the side wall 14, as best shown in FIG. 3.

Also, as best shown in FIG. 7, the electric motor 61 comprises a power supply cable 91 in which there is arranged a manually operable switch 92. The switch 92 is carried by the member 43 and is provided with a manually operable control element 93 that projects through a cooperating hole formed in the side wall 14 to the exterior of the casing 11. The extreme outer end of the cable 91 terminates in a conventional electric plug, not shown, that may be inserted in a conventional electric socket, not shown.

In the construction of the unit 70, the principal elements 73, 75, 79, etc., are preferably formed of aluminum alloy tubing, or other light-weight material, so that the ventilator 10 has a'minimum weight'and great strength;

Considering now the general mode of operation of the ventilator 10, it will be understood that after the same has been assembled and is in readiness for use, the same may be operated either manually, by operation of the unit 70, or by electric power, by operation of the electric motor 61. First assume that the ventilator 10 is to be operated manually, it is apparent that a pers-onmay operate the unit 70 in the general manner of operating a bicycle; whereby the pedal arrangement effects rotation of the sprocket wheel 74 and the rotation of the pulley 76 through the chain 77 and the coaster mechanism 78. Rotation of the pulley 76 effects rotation ofthe pulley through the belt 84; whereby the operating shaft 63 of the electric motor 61 is rotated to cause rotation of the fan 64. Rotation of the fan 64 causes air to be pumped from the chamber 53 through the opening 52 provided in the board '51 and into the chamber 54; all for a purpose more fully explained below. Now assume that the ventilator 10 is to be ope-rated by electric power, the cable 91 is connected to the available electric power supply source, not shown; and the electric switch 92 is closed by operation of the normally operable control element 93, so that the electricmotor 61 is energized. When the electric motor 61 is thus energized, the operating shaft 63 is rotated to effect rotation of the fan 64 in the manner previously explained. Rotation of the operating shaft 63 by the electric motor 61 effects rotation of the pulley 65 and the consequent rotation of the pulley 76 through the belt 84; however, this rotation of the pulley 76 is not transmitted to the chain 77 by virtue of the conventional operation of the coaster mechanism 78.

Again referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, it is noted that the ventilator 10 further comprises a flexible inlet tube or hose 101 and a flexible outlet tube or hose 102; which hoses 101 and 102 are also housed in the chamber 54 defined in the casing 11 .prior to unpacking the elements of the ventilator 10. Each of the hoses 101 and 102 may be formed essentially of canvas with wire rings, not shown, sewed or otherwise secured in place therein at the elbows to prevent collapse thereof, all in a well known manner.

After unpacking of the casing 11, the inner end of the inlet tube 101 is suitably secured to the duct 55, as best shown in FIGS. 6 and 7; and the inlet tube 101 is strung-out with the end wall 16 in an open condition, since the board 51 prevents air leakage between the two chambers 53 and 54 within the casing 11. With reference to the outlet tube 102, a perforated circular knockout 12a is formed in the top wall 12 of the casing 11, as best shown in FIG. 6; which knock-out 12a may be removed from the top wall 12 to provide a corresponding circular opening into the top wall 12 adjacent to the end wall 17; and into this opening one end of the outlet tube 102 may be suitably secured, as shown in FIG. 2.

As best shown in FIG. '1, the side wall 14 of the easing 11 comprises an elongated upstanding strip-like kn-ocleout 14w that is removed incident to unpacking "0f the elements of the ventilator 10 from the casing 11 to provide the slot 14a therein, as shown in FIG. 3, so as to accommodate the passage of the belt 84 between the two pulleys 65 and 76, as previously explained. Also, two longitudinally spaced-apart circular knock-outs 14x are provided on opposite-sides of the knock-out 14w, which knock-outs 14x are disposed in alignment with the openings respectively formed in the framing members 42 and 43, as best shown in FIG. 7. When the knock-outs 14x are removed rtwo corresponding holes are formed in the side wall 14 so as to accommodate the insertion of the members 81 therethrough, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 and as previously described.

Further, an elongated longitudinally extending striplike knock-out 14y is provided in the side wall 14 adjacent to and below the knock-out 12a provided in the top wall 12. The knock-out 14y may be removed to provide a corresponding elongated longitudinally extending slot in the side wall 14 for the purpose of receiving a throttle plate indicated at 103 in FIG. 2; which throttle plate 103 may be variably inserted into the slot mentioned provided in the side wall 14 so as correspondingly to throttle the passage of the air from the chamber 54 into the outlet tube 102.

In the operation of the ventilator 10, the chamber 54 communicating with the outlet tube 102 constitutes a plenum chamber; whereby the casing 11 not only serves as a packing case for the ventilator for the shipping and storage purpose, but also serves to define the plenum chamber for the fan 64, when the ventilator 10 is operated.

In view of the above description, it will be understood that the ventilator 10 is operative to draw air through the inlet tube 101 and to force the air through the outlet tube 102, whereby either tube 101 or 102 may communicate with the shelter or desired enclosure so that foul air may be withdrawn from the desired enclosure and exhausted to the outside, or fresh air may be taken from the outside and pumped into the desired enclosure.

Also, the ventilator 10 may be operated by the electric motor 61, when a source of electric power supply is available, or the ventilator 10 may be operated manually by the unit 70, when no source of electric power supply is available.

In either operation of the ventilator 10 mentioned, the same has a capacity of 3000 c. f.m. at 0.1" of water pressure and 1000 c.f.m. at 0.6" of water pressure.

The ventilator 10 is of light-weight construction so that one person may readily move the same about as required and may quickly place the same in service in a simple and ready manner, .as previously described. Any small tools, such as a screw driver, adhesive tape, etc., that might be required in erecting or assembling the ventilator 10 are placed in the chamber 54 prior to sealing of the casing 11 for initial shipment to the shelter or other desired enclosure for storage for future use in an emergency.

In view of the foregoing, it is apparent that there has been provided a portable ventilator of improved and simplified construction and arrangement, wherein the casing for packaging and storing the elements thereof when the ventilator is not in use, also serves to define a plenum chamber for the ventilator when the same is in use.

While there has been described what is at present considered to be the preferred embodiment of the invention, it will be understood that various modifications may be made therein, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A portable ventilator comprising an enclosing casing, a partition arranged in said casing and dividing the interior thereof into two adjacent chambers, said partition having an opening therein communicating between said chambers, an impeller mounted within said casing adjacent to said opening, means for rotating said impeller, rotation of said impeller causing air to be pumped from one of said chambers through said opening into the other of said chambers, said casing having an air inlet communicating with said one chamber and an air outlet communicating with said other chamber, whereby said other chamber constitutes a plenum chamber positioned between said impeller and said air outlet when said ventilator is in use, a flexible inlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air inlet, and a flexible outlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air outlet, said flexible hoses being collapsible into compact form for convenient storage in said other chamber, whereby said other chamber may constitute a storage chamber for said collapsed hoses when said ventilator is not in use.

2. The portable ventilator set forth in claim 1, wherein said casing is of box-like configuration comprising top and bottom walls and a pair of side walls and a pair of end walls, and a plurality of reinforcing members arranged within said casing to prevent the collapse thereof, whereby said casing also constitutes an initial shipping carton for said ventilator.

3. The portable ventilator set forth in claim 2, wherein the walls of said casing are formed essentially of corrugated fiber board.

4. A portable ventilator comprising an enclosing casing of box-like configuration including top and bottom walls and a pair of side walls and a pair of end walls, a plurality of reinforcing members arranged within said casing to prevent the collapse thereof, the walls of said casing being formed essentially of fiber board, a partition arranged in said casing and disposed intermediate said end walls and dividing the interior of said easing into two adjacent chambers, said partition having an opening therein communicating between said chambers, an impeller mounted within said casing adjacent to said opening, means for rotating said impeller, rotation of said impeller causing air to be pumped from one of said chambers through said opening into the other of said chambers, said casing having an air inlet communicating through one of said end walls with said one chamber disposed adjacent to said one end wall, said casing having an air outlet communicating through said top wall with said other chamber, whereby said other chamber constitutes a plenum chamber positioned between said impeller and said air outlet when said ventilator is in use, a flexible inlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air inlet, and a flexible outlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air outlet, said flexible hoses being collapsible into compact form for convenient storage in said other chamber, whereby said other chamber may constitute a storage chamber for said collapsed hoses when said ventilator is not in use.

5. A portable ventilator comprising an enclosing casing,

a partition arranged in said casing and dividing the interior thereof into two adjacent chambers, said partition having an opening therein communicating between said chambers, an impeller mounted within said casing adjacent to said opening, an electric motor mounted within said casing and operatively connected to said impeller, an electric circuit for operating said electric motor, operation of said electric motor effecting rotation of said impeller, rotation of said impeller causing air to be pumped from one of said chambers through said opening into the other of said chambers, said casing having an air inlet communicating with said one chamber and an air outlet communicating with said other chamber, whereby said other chamber constitutes a plenum chamber positioned between said impeller and said air outlet when said ventilator is in use, a flexible inlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air inlet, and a flexible outlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air outlet, said flexible hoses being collapsible into compact form for convenient storage in said other chamber, whereby said other chamber may constitute a storage chamber for said collapsed hoses when said ventilator is not in use.

6. A portable ventilator comprising an enclosing casing, a partition arranged in said casing and dividing the interior thereof into two adjacent chambers, said partition having an opening therein communicating between said chambers, an impeller mounted within said casing adjacent to said opening, a frame unit of the knock-down type that may be readily assembled and disassembled, means for securing said frame unit in its assembled condition to said casing, pedal-operated mechanism carried by said frame unit, means for operatively connecting said pedal-operated mechanism to said impeller when said frame unit in its assembled condition is secured to said casing, operation of said pedal-operated mechanism effecting rotation of said impeller, rotation of said impeller causing air to be pumped from one of saidchambers through said opening into the other of said chambers, said casing having an air inlet communicating with said one chamber and an air outlet communicating with said other chamber, whereby said other chamber constitutes a plenum chamber positioned between said impeller and said air outlet when said ventilator is in use, said frame unit in its disassembled condition being in compact form for convenient storage in said other chamber, whereby said other chamber may constitute a storage chamber for said disassembled frame unit when said ventilator is not in use.

7. A portable ventilator comprising an enclosing casing, a partition arranged in said casing and dividing the interior thereof into two adjacent chambers, said partition having an opening therein communicating between said chambers, an impeller mounted within said casing adjacent to said opening, a frame unit of the knock-down type that may be readily assembled and disassembled, means for securing said frame unit in its assembled condition to said casing, pedal-operated mechanism carried by said frame unit, means for operatively connecting said pedal-operated mechanism to said impeller when said frame unit in its assembled condition is secured to said casing, operation of said pedal-operated mechanism effecting rotation of said impeller, rotation of said impeller causing air to be pumped from one of said chambers through said opening into the other of said "chambers, said casing having an air inlet communicating with said one chamber and an air outlet communicating with said other chamber, whereby said other chamber constitutes a plenum chamber positioned between said impeller and said air outlet when said ventilator is in use, said frame unit in its disassembled condition being in compact form for convenient storage in said other chamber, whereby said other chamber may constitute a storage chamber for said disassembled frame unit when said ventilator is -not in use, a flexible inlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air inlet, and a flexible outlet hose adapted to be detachably connected to said air outlet, said flexible hoses being collapsible into compact form for convenient storage in said other chamber, whereby said other chamber may also constitute a storage chamber for said collapsed hoses When said ventilator is not in use.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,661,239 12/1953 Tirrell.

FOREIGN PATENTS 800,350 7/1936 France.

ROBERT M. WALKER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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FR800350A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4589656 *Nov 7, 1984May 20, 1986Nautilus Sports/Medical Industries, Inc.Aerobic exercise device for increased user comfort
US4789153 *Oct 1, 1985Dec 6, 1988Brown Lawrence GExercise system
US5318317 *Dec 12, 1991Jun 7, 1994Velo Research, Inc.Bicycle operated air pump
US5397144 *Feb 28, 1994Mar 14, 1995Velo Research, Inc.Bicycle operated air pump
US5626072 *Dec 21, 1994May 6, 1997Velo Research, Inc.Piston assembly for use with a bicycle operated air pump
US7172532Jul 13, 2004Feb 6, 2007Nautilus, Inc.Exercise device tubing
US7175570Mar 6, 2002Feb 13, 2007Nautilus, Inc.Exercise bicycle frame
US7226393Jan 17, 2002Jun 5, 2007Nautilus, Inc.Exercise bicycle
US7364533Jul 13, 2004Apr 29, 2008Nautilus, Inc.Adjustment assembly for exercise device
US7771325Jun 4, 2007Aug 10, 2010Nautilus, Inc.Exercise bicycle
Classifications
U.S. Classification415/124, 415/121.3, 415/124.2, 416/146.00R, 415/223, 416/173, 415/182.1
International ClassificationF04D25/02, F04D25/08
Cooperative ClassificationF04D25/086
European ClassificationF04D25/08C2