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Publication numberUS3285428 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1966
Filing dateDec 21, 1964
Priority dateDec 21, 1964
Publication numberUS 3285428 A, US 3285428A, US-A-3285428, US3285428 A, US3285428A
InventorsScheck Roy S
Original AssigneeUnarco Industries
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storage rack
US 3285428 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1966 R. s. SCHECK 3,285,428

STORAGE RACK Filed Dec. 21, 1964 I I I I 5 18 L I 11. I f 44 z, 4 4 lIf 4 i 'i'i. 4

' 48 INVENTOR DOY S. SCHECK United States Patent 3,285,428 STORAGE RACK Roy S. Scheck, Itasca, Ill., assignor to Unarco Industries,

c., Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed Dec. 21, 1964, Ser. No. 420,007 4 Claims. (Cl. 211148) This invention relates to storage racks and more particularly to racks having cross bars on which various types of bulk commodities can be stored. Racks have heretofore been proposed in which horizontally spaced parallel rails carry a series of cross bars to receive cartons, rolls of material, such as bolts of textiles, rolls of carpeting, or the like, for storage. Such racks have commonly been formed with ledges on the inner surfaces of the rails on which the end portions of the cross bars rest with the upper surfaces of the cross bars substantially flush with the upper surfaces of the rails. One such rack is disclosed in the patent to Franks, Reissue No. 24,535.

While constructions of this type are entirely satisfactory for cartons and for many other types of commodities, they have been found not to be completely satisfactory for storing commodities such as bolts of cloth, rolls of carpeting, and the like. In handling commodities of this type, the cross bars tend to be shifted or lifted out of position so that they will not support the commodities properly.

It is accordingly one of the objects of the present invention to provide a storage rack in which the cross bars are held against accidental displacement either horizontally or vertically.

Another object is to provide a storage rack in which the cross bars are resiliently latched in the desired position between the rails.

According to a feature of the invention, the cross bars are for-med of inverted channel section strips with inwardly extending lips at the lower edges of the channel side members to snap over Wedge shaped latch members on the side rails thereby to hold the cross bars accurately in position.

The above and other objects and features of the invention will be more readily apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a storage rack embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a transverse section through a pair of side rails showing a cross bar in evlevation;

FIG. 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2; and

FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 are partial sectional views illustrating steps in the assembly of a cross bar in the rack.

The rack, as shown in FIG. 1, is the general configuration of that disclosed in Franks Reissue No. 24,535. This rack comprises end members indicated generally at 9 formed of upright posts 10 connected in pairs by cross members 11. The posts are preferably of channel section formed with a series of vertically spaced openings at their corners with the cross members 11 permanently secured thereto as by welding or similar fastening.

A complete rack comprises two end members, including four vertical posts 10 spaced apart and connected by side rails 12. The side rails 12 may be attached to the posts at any one of a plurality of selected vertical points and preferably two or more pairs of side rails are mounted on each rack. As best seen in FIG. 2, each of the side rails is formed of sheet material, tubular in section, and having a generally horizontal ledge 13 intermediate its top and bottom surfaces at its inner side surface. The ledge 13 is connected to the top surface of the side rail by a vertical shoulder 14, as shown.

Commodities to be supported by the rack rest on cross bars 15, any desired number of which may be provided,

3,285,428- Patented Nov. 15, 1966 extending between the side rails and which may be spaced to accommodate different types of commodities, as required. As best seen in FIG. 3, each of the cross bars 15 is of inverted channel section with inwardly extending lips 16 at the lower edges of the channel sides. Preferably the lips are turned upwardly at their extreme inner edges, as shown at 16a and are spaced to leave an open slot 16b in the bottom of each side rail. The cross bars are of a length to span the space between adjacent side rails with their end portions resting on the ledges 13 on the side rails, as shown, and are of a depth such that their upper surfaces will lie substantially flush with the upper surfaces of the side rails.

According to the present invention, the cross bars are held in the desired position between the side rails against accidental displacement in either a horizontal or a vertical direction. For this purpose an elongated strip 17 is secured to the inner face of each side rail 12 below the ledge 13 thereon as, for example, by welding. Each strip 17 is formed with a plurality of spaced upwardly extending =wedge member 18 which project above the ledges 13. Each of the wedge members, as shown, flares downwardly from a top portion of minimum width to a portion of maximum width spaced above the ledge 13 and then reduces in width to a narrow neck portion 20 to leave downwardly facing latch surfaces 19 above the level of the ledge 13.

When a cross bar is to be installed between the side rails its end portion may be placed over one of the wedge members 18 with the reduced upper end of the wedge member fitting between the lips 16, as shown in FIG. 4. The cross bar may then be pressed or struck to move it downwardly to its final position. As the cross bar moves downwardly, its sides will spring outward, as shown in FIG. 5, so that the lips 16 will pass over the maximum width portion of the wedge member. When the cross bar is moved down to its final position, as shown in FIG. 6, the lips will snap back beneath the downwardly facing shoulders 19 to latch the cross bar against accidental upward displacement. Also it will be seen that the wedge members 18 will prevent displacement of the cross bars longitudinally of the rails so that the cross bars will be held accurately in position during all normal uses of the rack. It will also be apparent that the rack can be disassembled when desired and all of the parts can be reassembled either in the same or in different desired relationship.

While one embodiment of the invention has been shown and described herein, it will be understood that it is illustrative only and not to be taken as a definition of the scope of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A storage rack comprising a plurality of pairs of connected spaced upright posts, a pair of rails supported by the posts in horizontally spaced parallel relationship, each of the rails being formed on its inner side surface with an inwardly extending ledge, a vertically extending wedge member secured to the inner surface of each rail and projecting vertically above the ledge thereon and formed with a downwardly facing latching shoulder, and a cross bar of resilient material and inverted channel sec tion having an inwardly extending lip on at least one of its lower edges, the cross bar spanning the space be tween the rails with its end portions resting on the ledges and the Wedge members fitting into the inverted channel with the lips underlying the shoulders on the wedge members to prevent accidental removal of the cross bar.

2. A storage rack comprising a plurality of pairs of connected spaced upright posts, a pair of rails supported by the posts in horizontally spaced parallel relationship, each of the rails being formed on its inner side surface with an inwardly extending ledge, a plurality of spaced vertically extending wedge members secured to the inner surface of each rail and projecting above the ledge thereon and formed with at least one downwardly facing latching shoulder, and at least one cross bar of resilient material and inverted channel section having an inwardly extending lip on at least one of its lower edges, the cross bar being adapted to span the space between the rails with its end portions resting on the ledges and a wedge member on each rail fitting into the inverted channel and with the lips underlying the shoulders on the wedge members to prevent accidental removal of the cross bar.

3. The storage rack of claim 1 in which the cross bar has an inwardly turned lip on each of its lower edges and each wedge member flares from a narrow tip to a maximum width greater than the space between the lips and then narrows to define a downwardly facing shoulder at each side thereof.

4. A storage rack comprising a plurality of pairs of connected spaced upright posts, a pair of rails supported by the posts in horizontally spaced parallel relationship, each of the rails being formed on its inner side surface with an inwardly extending ledge, a vertically extending wedge member secured to each of the rails and projecting References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,529,420 11/ 1950 Ramquist 2 4255 .2 2,815,130 12/1957 Franks 211-148 2,895,755 7/1959 Golde 287--56 3,164,260 1/1965 Seeman 211177 FOREIGN PATENTS 245,579 5/ 1963 Australia. 1,299,967 6/ 1962 France.

CLAUDE A. LE ROY, Primary Examiner.

vertically above the ledge thereon and formed with a 25 W. D. LOULAN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2529420 *Oct 1, 1946Nov 7, 1950Ramquist Amos HRoll holder
US2815130 *Feb 6, 1956Dec 3, 1957Norvin H FranksShelving unit
US2895755 *May 29, 1957Jul 21, 1959Golde Hans TApparatus for slidable closures
US3164260 *May 9, 1963Jan 5, 1965Werner SeemanDisplay rack construction
AU245579B * Title not available
FR1299967A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3654887 *Mar 18, 1970Apr 11, 1972Mitsui Shipbuilding EngContainer supporting apparatus for container ship
US3814034 *Oct 27, 1972Jun 4, 1974Seiz ELoad supports for storage structures
US3878605 *Dec 11, 1972Apr 22, 1975Philip Morris IncHandle construction
US3901164 *Jul 16, 1973Aug 26, 1975Gibson Greeting CardsModular display structure
US3979900 *Feb 24, 1975Sep 14, 1976Adolf Jerger KgDevice for connecting two parts of a clock
US4078664 *Mar 25, 1977Mar 14, 1978Interlake, Inc.Cross bar
US4118923 *Oct 15, 1976Oct 10, 1978Pibor S.A.Push-button assembly and manufacturing method
US4141821 *Dec 1, 1976Feb 27, 1979Firma Steinhaus GmbhScreening deck assembly
US4216729 *Feb 8, 1979Aug 12, 1980Nashville Wire Products Manufacturing Co., Inc.Deck channel for storage rack beam
US4332204 *May 19, 1980Jun 1, 1982The Mead CorporationMerchandising display stand
US4717298 *Jan 2, 1986Jan 5, 1988Bott John AnthonyCargo restraint system
US5167434 *Oct 16, 1990Dec 1, 1992Bott John AnthonyCargo restraint sytem for pick-up truck bedliners
US5279431 *Dec 9, 1992Jan 18, 1994Unr Industries, Inc.Storage rack with improved beam-to-crossbar connections
US5522206 *May 6, 1994Jun 4, 1996Riverwood International CorporationSelf fastening guide for guide rails
US5716155 *Sep 15, 1994Feb 10, 1998Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaT-shaped connection frame
US6105798 *Nov 6, 1998Aug 22, 2000Interlake Material Handling, Inc.Rack with special mounting arrangement
US6425558 *Apr 10, 2000Jul 30, 2002George D. SaundersCargo extension frame
US7748546 *May 18, 2006Jul 6, 2010Konstant Products, Inc.Reinforced and bolted rack truss
US7753220 *Jan 27, 2006Jul 13, 2010Konstant Products, Inc.Reinforced and bolted rack truss
US7891507Dec 20, 2007Feb 22, 2011Jakie ShetlerStorage rack decking derived from a single sheet of sheet metal
US8522987 *May 26, 2010Sep 3, 2013Seville Classics IncStorage rack
US8651295 *Jul 26, 2013Feb 18, 2014Seville Classics, Inc.Storage rack
US20110290750 *May 26, 2010Dec 1, 2011Lim Gary MStorage rack
US20120000871 *Jul 2, 2010Jan 5, 2012Edsal Manufacturing Co., Inc.Portion of shelf and support for shelving unit
US20140190918 *Jan 29, 2014Jul 10, 2014Seville Classics Inc.Storage Rack
WO1994013178A1 *Sep 22, 1993Jun 23, 1994Unr Ind IncStorage rack with improved beam-to-crossbar connections
WO2007056576A2 *Nov 9, 2006May 18, 2007David J CrossStorage surface assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/191, 29/453, 52/716.1, 52/666, 211/182, 403/326, 211/187
International ClassificationA47B57/00, A47B57/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47B57/06
European ClassificationA47B57/06