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Publication numberUS3285619 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1966
Filing dateFeb 11, 1965
Priority dateFeb 11, 1965
Publication numberUS 3285619 A, US 3285619A, US-A-3285619, US3285619 A, US3285619A
InventorsJohn V Kitrell, Robert R Wickes
Original AssigneeLincoln Carriage Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wheel chair
US 3285619 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 15, 1966 J. v.K1TREl L ETAL 3,285,619

WHEEL CHAIR Filed Feb. 1l, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet l JOHN V. KITRELL BY ROBERT R. WIC ES N0V- 15, 1966 J. v. KITRELL ETAL 3,285,619

WHEEL CHAIR 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. ll, 1965 INVENTOR. JOHN V. KITRELL BY ROBERT R. WICKES Nov. 15, 1966 J. v. KITRELI. ETAL 3,285,619

WHEEL CHAIR 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. ll. 1965 INVENTOR. JOHN V. KITRELL BY ROBERT R. WICKES Nov. 15, 1966 J. v. KITRELL ETAI.

WHEEL CHAIR 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 11, 1965 o3 nnHUmnHIlfHlllUJl INVENTOR JOHN v. K'nRELL By ROBERT R. wlcxes Nov. 15, 1966 J. v. KITRELL ETAL.

WHEEL CHAIR 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. ll, 1965 `III!1111im11111111111111111V INVENTOR JOHN v KITRELL ROBERT R. wlcKEs United States Patent O f 3,285,619 WHEEL CHAIR .lohn V. Kitrell, Lincoln, Nebr., and Robert R. Wickes,

Scottsdale, Ariz., assignors to Lincoln Carriage Corporation, Tempe, Ariz., a corporation of Arizona Filed Feb. 11, i965, Ser. No. 431,956 Claims. (Cl. 28th-34) This invention relates to a Wheel chair `and more par# ticularly to a wheel chair having novel features which facilitate the handling of disabled pa-tients.

It has been a problem to transfer a disabled patient from a bed to a wheel chair orfrom a wheel chair to a bed without substantial manual stress or strain on a disabled patient. In most instances, a disabled patient must be manually picked up and placed in a wheel chair in order to transfer him from a bed to another location.4

This is particularly true in convalescing patients who spend part of their time in a wheel chair and the remaining portion of their time in bed. Such patients being disabled to the extent that they are unable to handle themselves in the movements to andvfrom a wheel chair.

Many such patients are heavy and many of the lattendants or nurses are not physically equipped manually to transfer .such heavy patients to and from a wheel chair and especially when the patient is being moved into or out of a -bed relative to thewheel chair.

Various prior .art wheel chairs have been :devices to assist patients and their attendants. However, a great need has been recognized for a wheel `chair which will readily transfer a patient directly onto the upper surface t of a bed without any hazard of dropping the patient on the floor or creating undue discomfort of lthe patient.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a novel wheel chair which is particularly adapted to handle disabled patients and to deposit them directly onto the upper surfa-ce of a bed in such a manner that they are transferred to a median portion ofthe bed without the hazard of rolling off the edge of the bed during the placement of such patients thereon.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel wheel chair for transferring patients to and from a bed which comprises a novel frame having supporting wheels disposed to run under the bed -to support a load disposed over a median portion of the bed; said wheel chair structure al-so comprising a vertically swiveled cantilevered seat which is disposed to pass over the upper surface of the bed whereby the seat may be pivoted about a vertical axis and the back of the seat may be pivoted downwardly into horizontal position so that a patient may lie in horizontal pos-ition in the chair directly over the bed s-o that he may subsequntly be rolled onto a median portion of the bed at a considerable distance inwardly of the edge of the bed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel wheel chair particularly adapted for loading and unloading patients relative to the upper surface of 'a bed comprising novel wheel and frame structure disposed to receive a patients bed below the wheel chair seat which is provided with novel pivoted foot and back supports which may be disposed horizontally subsequent to the pivotal movement of the seat about a vertical `axis whereby the entire seat, foot rest, and back rest structure of lthe chair may be disposed in superimposed relationship over rthe upper surface of the bed at a considerable distance inwardly of lthe edge of the bed.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel wheel chair structure which permits relatively frail attendants -or nu-rses to load and unload relatively heavy patients when transferring them to or from a bed relative to the wheel chair of the present invention.

Patented Nov. 15, 1965 ICC Another object of the invention is to provide a novel wheel chair which contributes to the comfort of patients being loaded and unloaded to or from a bed relative to the wheel chair of the present invention.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel wheel chair construction having small wheels at the front of the chair which are small enough to be projected under a patients bed and relatively larger wheels operable by the patient and which are provided with axle means adjustable horizontally and rearwardly relative to said forward wheels whereby the peripheries of the larger wheels may be moved back relative to the wheel chair frame so that the peripheries of these wheels may cle-ar the side of the patients bed during a time when the smaller wheels are projected under the bed a suilicient distance to lie beyond or below the center of gravity of the patient being unloaded from an elevated cantilever seat structure of the wheel chair and onto a bed above the small wheels.

Another object of the invention is to provide a wheel chair having small wheels at the forward portion of the chair; said small wheels being sufliciently small to be projected under a patients bed; said small wheels having means in connection with the wheel chair frame for extending them forwardly t-o a .sufficient distance under the bed to underlie the center of gravity of a patient being loaded or unloaded relative to an elevated cantilever chair porti-on of the wheel chair of the invention.

Other objects and advantages of the invention may be apparent from the following specication, appended claims, and accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. l is a side elevational view of a wheel chair in accordance with the present invention, shown with the seat of the wheel chair overlying a bed structure and wheel supports -of the chair disposed beneath the bed structure and illustrating varying positions of the chair, back rest, and leg supporting structure relative to the bed which is illustrated in broken lines;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary plan sectional view taken from the line 2 2 of FIG. 1, but showing the padding of the seat struotureremoved and illustrating the seat frame and structure for pivoting it about a vertical axis relative to the chair frame;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View taken from the line 3 3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view taken from the line 4 4 of FIG. 2, showing portions broken away and in section to amplify the illustration;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken from the line 5 5 Iof FIG. 2, showing the reclining seat back hinge and lock assembly structure of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a portion of the Wheel chair frame structure showing the turntable track assembly and its supporting forks in an exploded view;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken from the line 7 7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View taken from the line 8 8 of FIG. 6, showing details of the turntable track structure and the supporting forks therefor;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevational vie-w of the main wheel supporting frame structure of the invention disposed to per-mit forward and rearward adjustment of the main wheels of the wheel chair so that the frame of the wheel chair may receive the edge lof a bed, as shown in FIG. l of the drawings;

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. l but showing a modification of the present invention including small wheels at the forward portion of the wheel chair of the invention which are telescopically extendable t-o a suiiicient position forwardly of the wheel lchair to underlie the center of gravity of a patient being loaded or unloaded relative to the upper surface of the bed by cantilever chair portion of the invention;

FIG. 1l is a fragmentary side elevational view of a portion of the wheel chair structure of the invention taken from a similar direction as that shown in FIG. 10, and showing portions broken away and in section to amplify the illustration of the telescopically extendable front wheels of the wheel chair; and

FIG. 12 is a plan sectional view taken from the line 12-12 of FIG l1.

As shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, the Wheel chair of the present invention is provided with a main frame having cantilever caster arms 12 supported by wheel casters 14. These arms 12 are secured to the main frame 10 which is provided with a horizontal slot 16 in which an axle 18 of main wheels 20 may be horizontally adjusted to move the main wheel 20 for and aft, as desired, for the purpose of receiving a bed structure within the wheel chair frame, all as will be hereinafter described in detail.

With reference to the slot structure 16, attention is directed to FIG. 9 of the drawings, wherein the main frame 10 is shown on an enlarged scale. The axle 18 of the main wheels 20 may be moved to either or two positions, as indicated by broken lines A or B, in FIG. 9 or the axle 18 may be disposed in any intermediate position therebetween within the limits of the slot 16, as desired.

From an inspection of FIG. 1 of the drawings, it will be seen that bed, mattress, and box spring structures 22 and 24 are received above the arms 12 and that the casters 14 may be disposed thereunder a considerable distance from the outer edge C of the bed. Seat structure 26 is supported above the casters 14 which are beyond the normal center of gravity 28 of a patient on the seat structure' 26. Thus, the `wheel chair of the invention may be placed in a position wherein the casters 14 are below the bed and a considerable distance inwardly of the outer edge C and the seat 26 may be placed over the bed while the wheels 20, at their axles 18, may be disposed in the broken line position A in the slot 16. Thus, the periphery of the wheels 20 does not interfere with the placement of the seat structure 26 above the bed and inwardly of the outer edge C thereof.

A kick stand is provided for lifting the wheel chair frame and the main wheels 20 clear of the floor for the purpose of adjusting the wheel axles 18 in the slots 16. The kick stand is attached to the main frame 10 by bolts 19 above which the stand members 17 may rotate to broken line positions and be held in such positions by elliptical leaf springs 21 reacting against the main frame 10 and a flat side of the stand member 17. The kick stand members 17 are of a length sufficient to support the wheels 20 above a floor at an elevation of about l inch, all of which provides suicient clearance for the hereinbefore described ajustment of the wheel axle longitudinally of each of the slots 16 in the frame members 10.

The main frame 10 is provided with vertical frame structures 30, there being t-wo of these upstanding frame structures 30 terminating in handles 32, at their upper ends. These handles 32 may be utilized by attendants or nurses for handling the wheel chair with the patient therein.

Cantilevered from the upstanding members 30 which are fixed to the main frame 10 are fork members 34. These fork members are shown best in FIGS. 6 and 7 of the drawings and are cantilevered from respective upstanding members 30 by fixed bracket portions 36 having pivoted latch levers 38 secured thereto. These latch levers 38 are pivoted on pins 40 and are loaded by springs 42 so that hook portions 44 of the latches will engage protruding lugs 46 on tublar structures 48 of a turnable frame 50, as will be hereinafter described in detail.

Each of the fork members 34 is provided with rollers 52 pivoted on pins 54 near the extending ends of these forks 34.

The turntable carriage 50 is provided with side rails 56 in which the forks 34 are disposed, as shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings, when the tublar structures 48 are in the broken line positions D showin in FIG. 6, of the drawings.

Supported in the frame 50 is a circular substantially C- shaped in cross-section track 58 which carries rollers 60 which are rotatably mounted on pins 62 held in brackets 64 extending downwardly from the seat frame 66, all as shown best in FIG. 4 of the drawings.

Extending laterally between the channel-shaped frame members 56 :are cross members 68 which support the C- shaped in cross-section circular track 58, all as shown best in FIGS. 2 and 4 of the drawings.

The seat frame 66 is preferably made of tubular material and is provided with curved members 70 and 72 secured by frame members 74 and 76 to side mem-bers 78 and 80 which are coupled to a tubular frame member 82 in the normally front portion of the seat structure 26. Foot rest bracket members 84 and 86 are pivotally secured to the tubular member 82 and a conventional seat padding structure 88 is secured on t-op of the seat frame 66 over the members 70, 72, 74, 76, 78, and 80, all as shown best in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings.

A back rest structure 89 is connected to upstanding members 90 and 92 which are pivoted to the rear ends of the seat frame members 78 and 80. The seat Iback 89 is thus pivotal backwardly into horizontal position, as

` will be hereinafter described in detail.

As shown in FIG. 5 of the drawings, the reclining back hinge lock structures for holding the seat back 89 in juxtaposition are disclosed. These hinge locks are designated 94 and 96 in FIGS. l, 2 and 4 of the drawings. These structures are similar and only the structure 94 will be hereinafter disclosed. The seat lframe member 78, as shown in FIG. 5 of the drawings, is provided with a bore 98 in which a hollow shaft 100l is rotatable. The seat back frame member is fixed to this hollow shaft and also fixed to the hollow shaft is -an externally serrated or gear-toothed annular member 102 which is disposed axially aligned and adjacent to the similar externally gear-toothed annular member 104 which is fixed to the frame member 78.

An internally gear-toothed cup 106 is fixed to an end of a shaft 108 which is rotatable internally of the -hollow shaft 100. An internal cam member 110 surrounds the cup 106 and is provided with a substantially helical internal cam track 112 engaged iby a projection 114 of the cup 106. A handle 118 on the internal cam 110 permits it to be rotated for moving the helical track 112 .and permitting the `follower portion 114 of t-he cup 106 to move inwardly toward the iframe 78. The internal teeth of the cup 106 couple the external teeth of the member 102 and the member 104 thereby locking them together. Since the member 104 is fixed to ythe frame 78 and since the frame 90 is fixed to the hollow shaft 100 which is fixed to the member 102. The cup- 106 thus 4locks the frame 90 relative to the frame 78.

A washer 116 of the hollow shaft 100 is engaged by a spring 119 which engages another washer 120 on the shaft 108. In operation, Ithe spring 119 thus tends to retract the shaft 108 and the cup 106 int-o engagement with the gear-toothed members 102 and 104. Thus, when the cam member 110 is rotated by the handle 118, the spring 119 forces the internally gear-toothed cup` 106 to engage the externally gear-toothed members 102 and 104 thus locking the back rest 89 in a certain angular position relative t-o the seat 26. Thus, the back rest 89 may be disposed at an incline to the horizon-tal. It may be vert-ical, or it may be horizontally disposed, as desired, and as will be hereinafter described in detail.

Each of the foot rest brackets 84 and 86 Iare also pivotal about the axis of the tubular member 82 so that Ithe foot rest structures may be disposed in a solid line position, as indicated in FIG. 1, or may be pivoted upwardly to a broken line position so 4that it may be disposed above the bed, 'as indicated in broken lines in FIG. 1 of the drawings.

Each of the foot rest brackets 84 and 86 is provided with a detent structure for holding these foot rest structures in various angular positions, all as shown best in FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings. f

The bracket 84 is a tubular member disposed internally and rotatably mounted in the tubular member `82. Fixed by pins 122 to the tubular member 84 is a ratchet-toothed member 124. This ratchet-toothed member 124 is provided with an annular row of buttress teeth 126- disposed to engage similar teeth 128 of a detent member 130 fixed by pins 132 to the tubular member 82.

A bolt 134 passes through both of the detent members 124 and 130 anda compression spring 136 is disposed on the bolt and held in compressive engagement with one end of the detent member 130 by means of a nut 138. The Ibolt 134 and spring 136 thus tend to force the buttress teeth 126 an-d 218 together and `to retract the bracket member 84 inwardly of the tubular member 82 inasmuch as the pins 132 hold the detent member 130 stationary and the spring 136 is engaged therewith. Thus, the foot rest structure Igenerally indicated at 140 in FIG. 1 of the drawings, may be pivoted upwardly by simply raising the foot rest structure 140 due to the inclination yof the buttress teeth 126 and 128 which will slide over each other by alternate compression of the spring 136.

When it is desired to pivo-t the foot rest assembly downward, the tubular brackets 84 and 86 are pulled outwardly of the tube 82, thus forcing the spring 136 under compression to separate thebuttress teeth 126 from the teeth 128 thereby permitting freely pivotal movement of the tubular brackets 84r and 86 relative to the tube 82 an-d thus permitting downward pivotal movement of the entirefoo-t rest'assembly 1.40 toa desired angular or vertical position. Y

Arm rests 142, at opposite sides of the seat 26, `are supported on vertically disposed brackets 144 having lower ends 146 supported in sockets 148 in the seat frame members 74 and 76, all as shown best in FIGS. 1 and 2 ofthe drawings.

Rotatably mounted on the brackets 36, are rollers 148 and 158; these rollers 148 and 151) being supported on pins 152 and 154, carried 'by the respective brackets 36.

The rollers 148 and 158 are vertically movable in hollow track structure of the upstanding members 30 so that the c'antilevered f-ork struct-ure carrying the seat of the present wheel chair may be vertically adjusted up and down the vertical members 30, as will be hereinafter described in detail.

Projecting from the brackets 36 are hooks 156 and 158 -which project through complimental4 openings in a bracket 160 to which is connected a lateral clip 162 carrying an internally screwthreaded nut 164 fixed thereto. Screwthreada-bly engaged with this nut 162 is an elevating screw 166 which bears against a thrust bearing 168 carried by a cross bar structure 170 supported on the members 18.

Accordingly, it will be seen that operation of the screw 166 -by a crank ,handle 172 provides for elevation of or lowering of the seat 26 in connection with the brackets 36 carrying the rollers 148 and 1150 which traverse the internal track struct-ure o'f the ropstanding members 30. This-adjustment permits the vertical adjustment of the seat 26 to a position above the upper corner 22 of a bed C, so that various beds of varying elevations may be negotiated in such a ymanner that the seat 26 and foot rest 140 may be positioned to overlie the bed and to handle patients relative to the upper surface thereof.

In operati-on, a patient may be carried in the wheel chair of the present invention, sitting on the seat structure 26 and resting against the back rest 89 which may be reclined between the |ups'tandin-g members 3i), if desired. The foot `rest structure 140 may be disposed vertically or horizontaliy lor it may be disposed vin variousangular positions relative to the vertical and horizontal. Normally, lhowever, the patient is carried with the back rest 89 in the upwardly direction position, as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, and the foot rest structure 148 in the solid line position, -as shown lin lFIG. 1. The wheel axle 18 may be in the normally rear end of the slot 16, in the position A, as `shown in FIG. 9, so that the periphery of the wheel will clearly permit the wheels 14 to be disposed under the bed and the Wheel 20 will not contact the edge C of the bed. Thus, the patient may be transported from some area toward Ihis bed andwhen the bed is approached, the `foot rest structure may be `moved upwardly into the broken line or :horizontal position, as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, so that the wheel 14 or caster 14 may be disposed under the bed and the foot rest structure 140 may be disposed over the upper surface of the bed. Subsequently, then, the seat structure 26 is rotate-d about avertical axis through the center of the circular track 58 by means of the rollers 60 which run in this circular track y58 forming a turntable flor the seat structure 26 and permitting it to be pivoted about a vertical laxis. The supports 64 carried by the seat trarne 66 support the seat structure 26 on the circular track 58 and the seat, together with the foot rest 140 are piyoted aro-und to a position degrees from that shown'in FIG. 1, into a substantially parallel position with the bed, as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings. It will be appreciated that the wheel chair, as shown in FIG. 1, is disposed at the side of the bed and that the view of FIG. 1 is taken from the end of the bed. When the seat structure 26 is rotated substantially 90 degrees, the seat and foot rest assembly will then be parallel to the longitudinal axis of thebed and the seat back l89 may then be released by the members 94 and 96 permitting the seat back 89 to pivot downwardly yinto a horizontal position so that the entire body structure of the patient may lie lhorizontally over the bed and may then be rolled onto the bed inwardly of the edge C without any hazard of dropping the patient over the edge- C when loading him onto the bed. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that this operation may be carried on in handling a very heavy patient kand may be accomplished by a diminutive operator as a small nurse without undue stress on either the nurse or the patient.

The reverse operation of iloading the patient onto the wheel chair 'tromthe bed merely includes the rolling of the patient onto the wheel chai-r structure with the foot rest, seat, and back rest structures all aligned in a horizontal position above the bed and -in close proxmity to the upper surface thereof. l

When the patient is on the wheel chair, the 4back rest 88 may be moved upward into a substantially vertical position, as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings. The seat 26 may then be rotated about a vertical taxis concentric with the circular track 58 substantially 90 degrees, whereupon the wheel chair may be retracted away from the bed to permit downwardly pivotal movement of the foot rest structure fand tol thereby place the patient into a normal upright sitting position for transportation or other activity, as desired.

It will be appreciated by those skilled in the :art that the forks 34 may be released `'from the turntable track 4frame 50 by pivoting the latches 38 at their hook portions 44 out of engagement with the projections 46 lon the frame 60. Thus, the whel chair and the forks may be moved away from the entire seat, foot rest, and lback rest structures when placed on a bed, if desired, so that the operator may load the patient onto `the foot rest, seat, and back rest structures w-ithout being enoumbered by the upstanding members 30 of the wheel chair frame. Further, it will be noted that the :arm rest 142 rnay` rea-diiy be removed from the sockets 148, as hereinbetore described, so that a patient rnay be lloaded onto the foot rest, seat,

' and back rest structures of the wheel chair, all in hori-.

Zontal position on the upper surface of the bed without interference yfrom the arm rest 142 or the upstanding unembe-rs 30 of the wheel oh-air structure. When the patient is loaded onto-the patient supporting structure of the chlair, the forks 34 may be lfor-ced into the c'h-annels 56 of the frame 50 by means of the rolllers 52 acting as anti-friction members and thus, the entire foot rest, seat, and back rest structures may be picked up from the upper sunface of the bed after the patient has been loaded there- In the modification of the invention, as shown in FIG. 10, main wheel frame members 180 a-re provided in lieu of the fname members 10, shown in FIG. 1 olf the drawings. The frame members 180 support hollow tubular generally horizontal members 182 in which extendable caster supporting arms 184 `are carried. These caster supporting larms 184 are supported at their outboard ends 186 -by casters 188 having small caster wheels 190 sufficiently small to permit the passage of the arms 184 below the underside -orf theV bed 192. The main wheels are mounted on stationary axles 194, each individually connected to one of the frame members 180. As shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, there are a pairof the frame lmembers 180 and between these frame members 180, and interconnecting them, is a cross member 196 having a screw :supporting bore 198. A bearing portion 200 of a jack screw 202 is supported in the bore 198 and a fixed shoulder 204 at one end of the lbearing member 198, and integral therewith, bears on one. side of the bar 196, while a collar 206 is fixed to the jack screw 202 by a pin 208 and this collar 206 bears on the opposite side of the bar 196. Thus, the jack screw 202 is rotatable relative to the bar 196, but fixed longitudinally of its axis.

Secured to the jack screw 202 outwardly of the collar 204 is a bell crank manually operable handle 210 for use in rotating the jack screw 202. It will be understood that this jack screw 202 may be operated by a small reduction gear moto-r or the like, if desired.

A hollow tubular member 212 surrounds the jack screw 202 and this member 212 is provided with an internally screw threaded nut portion 214, which engages external screw threads on the jack screw 202. This internally screw threaded nut serves when the jack screw 202 is rotated to actuate the tubular member 212 longitudinally of the axis of the screw 202.

The ltubular member 212 is provided with an internal bore 216 larger than the diameter of the jack screw 202, leaving an abutment shoulder 218 at the juncture of the internally screw threaded nut portion 214 and the bore 216.

A stud member 220 is fixed to a reduced diameter shank 222 of the jack screw 212 by a screw threaded nut 224.

The periphery of the stud member 220 is closely conformingly slidable in the bore 216 and may ab-ut the abutment 218 when the tubular member 212 is fully extended relative to the jack screw 202.

An end portion 226 of the hollow tubular member 212 carries laterally projecting arms 228, which are connected to the arms 184, which are telescopically slidably mounted in the tubular members 182, as hereinbefore described.

It will be seen that when lthe jack screw 202 is rotated to extend the hollow tubular member 212 that it carries the arms 228 and projects the arms 184 telescopically outwardly from the hollow tubular members 182 and thus projects the arms 184 to a broken line position A, consequently disposing an axis B of the Wheels 190 to a substantial distance from an edge C of the bed, such that the axes of .the wheels 190 are disposed forwardly of the normal center of gravity `of the patient as designated at 28, and thus, a patient may be loaded or unloaded relative to an upper surface 230 of the bed, as shown in FIG. 10 of the drawings, without causing the` wheel chair to tip, it being understood that the seat of the wheel chair is rotatable about the CeG line 28, and that the patientmay be rolled onto the seat or off from the seat, depending upon loading or unloading operations .and that the seat back, as hereinbefore described, will also Vbe in horizontal position along with the leg and foot rest structures.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the wheels 20 may be moved rearwardly or the wheels 190 may be moved forwardly with respect to the wheel chair frame, in order to attain a disposition of the wheels a sufficient distance under the bed to be somewhat forwardly -of the center of gravity of the patient as he is loaded and unloaded, with respect to the elevated seat of the wheel chair when it is disposed adjacent the upper surface o-f the bed, as hereinbefore described.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various modifications of the present invention may be restored to in a manner limited only by a just interpretation of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a Wheel chair the combination of: a main frame; a cantilever frame portion of said main frame; first wheels disposed to support said cantilever frame portion, said first Wheels of small enough diameter to pass under a bed; first axle means for rotatably mounting said first wheels relative to said cantilever frame portion; second relatively larger wheels supporting said frame and disposed to support said wheel chair'at a side of a bed, second axle means for said second wheels for rotatably coupling themto said frame, said relatively larger wheels having peripheries disposed and adapted to 'be operated by a patient in said chair; a seat frame pivotally mounted on said main frame on a substantially vertical axis, said seat frame cantilevered from said main frame and disposed in vertically spaced relation with and above said cantilevered frame portion and thereby adapted to be projected over a bed when said first supporting wheels are disposed undery a bed; and means supported on said frame for holding said first and second axle means and said first and second wheels in various relative forward and rearward spaced positions on said frame to permit variations of operating positions of said first and second wheels in order to clear the peripheries of said second wheels relative to the side of a bed when said first supporting wheels are under a bed and forward relative to said frame and a patient supported on said seat frame above the bed; said lmeans supported on said frame comprising extendable means in connection with said first wheels for extending them for wardly and -rearwardly relative to said Wheel chair frame.

2. In a Wheel ch-air the combination of: a main frame; a cantilever frame portion of said main frame; first wheels disposed to support said cantilever frame portion, said first wheels of small enough diameter to pass under a bed; first axle means for rotatably mounting said first wheels relative to said cantilever frame portion; second relatively larger wheels supporting said frame and disposed to support said wheel chair at a .side of a bed, second axle means for said second wheels for rotatably coupling them to said frame, said relatively larger wheels having peripheries disposed and adapted to be operated by a patient in said chair; a seat frame pivotally mounted on said main frame on a substantially vertical axis, said seat frame cantilevered from said main frame and disposed in vertically spaced relation with and above said cantilevered frame portion and thereby adapted to be projected over a bed when said first supporting wheels are disposed under a bed; and means supported on said frame for holding said first and second axle means and said first and second wheels in various relative forward and rearward spaced positions on said frame to permit variations of operating positions of said first `and second wheels in order to clear the peripheries of said second wheels relative to the side of a bed when said first supporting wheels are under a bed and forward relative to said frame and a patient supported on said seat frame above the bed; said me-ans supported on said frame comprising extendable means in connection with said first wheels for extending them forwardlyI and rearwardly relative to said wheel chair frame, said extendable means comprising telescopic members horizontally extendable from said frame.

3. In a wheel chair the combination of: a main frame; a cantilever frame portion of said main frame; first wheels disposed to support said cantilever frame portion, said first wheels of small enough diameter to pass under a bed; first axle means for rotatably mounting said first wheels relative to said cantilever frame portion; second relatively larger wheels supporting said frame and disposed to support said wheel chair at a side of a bed, second axle means for said second wheels for rotatably coupling them to said frame, said relatively larger wheels having peripheries disposed and adapted to be operated by a patient in said chair; a seat frame pivotally mounted on said main frame on a substantially vertical axis, said seat frame cantilevered from said main frame and disposed in vertically spa-ced relation with and above said cantilevered frame portion and thereby adapted to be projected over a bed when said first supporting wheels are disposed under a bed; and means supported on said frame for holding said first and second axle means and said first and second wheels in various relative forward and rearward spaced positions on said frame to permit variations of -operating positions of said first and second wheels in order to clear the peripheries of said second wheels relative to the side of a bed when said first supporting wheels are under la bed and forward relative to said frame and a patient supported on said seat frame above the bed; said means supported on said frame comprising extendable means in connection with said first wheels for extending them forwardly and rearwardly relative to said Wheel chair frame; means for forcefully projecting and retracting said extendable means forwardly and rearwardly relative to said frame.

4. In a wheel chair the combination of: a main frame; a cantilever frame portion of said main frame; first wheels disposed to support said cantilever frame portion, said first wheels of small enough diameter to pass under a bed; first axle means for rotatably mounting said first wheels relative to said cantilever frame portion; second relatively larger Wheels supporting said frame and disposed to support said wheel chair at a side of a bed, second axle means for said second wheels for rotatably coupling them to said frame, said relatively larger wheels having peripheries disposed and adapted to be operated by a patient in said chair; a seat frame pivotally mounted on said main frame on a substantially vertical axis, said seat frame cantilevered from said main frame and disposed in vertically spaced relation with and above said cantilevered frame portion and thereby adapted to be projected over a bed when said first supporting wheels are disposed under a bed; and means supported on s-aid frame for holding said first and second axle means and said first and second wheels in various -relative forward and rearward spaced positions on said frame to permit variations of operating positions of said first and second wheels in order to clear the peripheries of said second wheels relative to the side of a bed when said rst supporting wheels are under a bed and forward relative to said frame and a patient supported on said seat frame above the bed; said means supported on said frame comprising extendable means in connection with said first wheels for extending them forwardly and rearwardly relative to said `wheel chair fra-me; means for forcefully projecting and retracting said extendable means forwardly and rearwardly relative to said frame, said means comprising a screw jack mechanism supported on said frame and disposed between the individual extendable means respective t0 each of said first wheels.

5. In a wheel chair the combination of: a main frame; a cantilever frame portion of said frame; first wheels disposed to support said cantilever frame portion, said first wheels of small enough diameter to pass under a bed; first axle means for rotatably mounting said first wheels relative to said cantilever frame portion; second relatively larger wheels supporting said frame and disposed to support said wheel chair at a side of a bed, second axle means for said second wheels for rotatably coupling them to said frame, said relatively larger wheels having peripheries disposed and adapted to be operated by a patient in said chair; a seat frame pivotally mounted on said main frame on a substantially vertical axis, said seat frame cantilevered from said main frame and disposed in vertically spaced relation with and above said cantilevered frame portion and thereby adapted to be projected over a bed when said first supporting wheels are disposed under a bed; and means supported on said frame for holding said first and second axle means and said first and second wheels in various relative forward and rearward spaced positions on said frame to permit variations of operating positions of said first and second wheels in order to clear the peripheries of said second wheels relative to the side of a bed when said first supporting wheels 4are under a bed and forward relative to said frame and a patient supported on said seat frame above the bed; said means supported on said frame comprising extendable means in connection with said first wheels for extending them forwardly and rearwardly relative to said wheel chair frame; caster mechanisms pivotal on a vertical axis and interconnecting said first Wheels and said extendable means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS BENJAMIN HERSH,

M. S. SALES, Assistant Examiner.

Primary Examiner

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3413663 *Feb 23, 1967Dec 3, 1968David T. SwannCombination stretcher, table, chair combination
US4016005 *Jan 28, 1975Apr 5, 1977Dynell Electronics CorporationMethod of transferring a person from a reclined position to a seated position
US5112076 *Feb 23, 1990May 12, 1992Wilson Harold RWheelchair with removable seat
US5201377 *Nov 8, 1991Apr 13, 1993Love Lift, L.P.Wheelchair with sidewardly swingable seat
US5255934 *Aug 23, 1991Oct 26, 1993Love Lift, L.P.Wheelchair seat convertible to toilet seat
US5333887 *Nov 16, 1993Aug 2, 1994Joe SharpWheelchair/gurney
US5356172 *Oct 21, 1993Oct 18, 1994Zvi Gilad SmolinskySliding seat assembly for a propelled wheel chair
US5380034 *Sep 11, 1992Jan 10, 1995Love Lift, L.P.Wheelchair with convertible seat-stretcher
US5384920 *Sep 9, 1993Jan 31, 1995Havens; Thomas R.Bedside toilet for incapacitated patients
US7278653Sep 4, 2003Oct 9, 2007Otto Bock Healthcare GmbhWheelchair, particularly electric wheelchair
US7686319 *May 31, 2006Mar 30, 2010Robert M FinkDouble amputee conveyance
WO2004030596A1 *Sep 4, 2003Apr 15, 2004Bock Healthcare GmbhWheelchair, particularly electric wheelchair
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/657, 5/81.10R, 5/87.1
International ClassificationA61G3/06, A61G5/00, A61G3/00, A61G5/12, A61G5/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61G3/06, A61G2005/128, A61G2005/125, A61G5/00, A61G5/1059
European ClassificationA61G3/06, A61G5/00, A61G5/10S2