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Publication numberUS3286279 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 22, 1966
Filing dateApr 1, 1964
Priority dateApr 1, 1964
Publication numberUS 3286279 A, US 3286279A, US-A-3286279, US3286279 A, US3286279A
InventorsBrown Maudestean C
Original AssigneeBrown Maudestean C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable baby bibs
US 3286279 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 22, 1966 M. c. BROWN 3,286,279

DISPOSABLE BABY BIBS Filedjpril 1, 1964 4 Ill [N702 Mil 0571674 f Ewa/A/ United States Patent 3,286,279 DISPOSABLE BABY BIBS Maudestean C. Brown, 4512 Don Arturo Place, Los Angeles, Calif. Filed Apr. 1, 1964, Ser. No. 356,677 2 Claims. (Cl. 2-49) The present invention relates to a bib structure, as for use on infants, and particularly to a bib structure incorporating dispensable sheets to provide a protective surface.

A wide variety of protective bibs have been proposed in the past for use on infants during feeding and for drooling children. Broadly, the protective surface of various bibs has in the past either been formed of absorbent material, eg cotton, or of smooth, slick impenetrable material e.g. plastic. Bibs with an absorptive protective surface are effective to catch and retain food that may be dropped from an infants mouth; however, these bibs must be frequently laundered in a wet wash, therefore, their use requires considerable time and effort.

As for bibs that have a slick surface of plastic or other film material, they are more easily cleaned than bibs formed of cotton; however, the plastic type bibs are not as effective in holding food that may be dropped from the childs mouth. That is, although the plastic bib may be relatively easily cleaned, this same characteristic renders the bib somewhat ineffective in retaining food dropped or spilled on the protective surface of the bib. Therefore, the use of a bib from either of these categories involves some compromise.

In an effort to avoid the compromise involved in the use of either plastic or absorbent bibs, paper bibs were proposed having a relatively absorbent surface and designed to be thrown away after a single use. In many situations, paper bibs are very effective; however, their use also involves some problems. For example, the ties of a paper bib are often troublesome. That is, if the bib is designed to be disposable, it is not economically feasible to employ more than the bare minimum tie, which usually comprises two strips of paper to be tied about the users neck. Therefore, the paper tie frequently tears rendering the bib useless.

Another difliculty involved in using prior paper bibs stems from the inherent weakness of paper as a material, particularly when wet. That is, an infant using a paper bib tends to tear and pull at the bib so that it is soon ineffective to protect his clothing. To avoid such difficulty, it has been previously proposed, to cover the'paper bib with an open net or reticulated material so that the paper is held together, however, it provides an absorbent surface. In general, bibs of this type are very effective in use; however, the operation of changing the paper in the bib has generally been messy and time consuming. Also the net is not completely effective in directing spilled food particles. As a result, paper bibs with a reticulated protective shield have not come into widespread use. Therefore, a need continues to exist for a bib that is effective in catching and retaining spilled food, which bib has sufficient strength for a reasonable period of use, and which bib can be neatly and easily used.

In general, the present invention comprises a protective bib that may be effectively used to protect an infant during feeding, for example, that includes a bib form, made of flexible material for example, that defines a substantially flat pocket with irregularities at the sides of the pocket and an access opening at the bottom. The front surface of the form is of ribbed material defining diamond-shaped apertures so as to expose the interior of the pocket. The bib then includes disposable napkins, formed for example of paper and held in stacked align- "ice ment in the pocket as a result of a mating relationship with the pocket irregularities. The bib structure further includes means for afiixing the bib about the users neck, which may take the form of a pair of straps. Furthermore, the bib may incorporate a surface pad supported outside the pocket and formed of wax backed absorbent material.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved protective bib structure.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a bib structure which is neat and easy to use while being effective to protect the wearers clothing and which includes diamond-shaped apertures to catch and direct spilled food.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a bib structure that may be economically manufactured and used, which structure has a retentive protective surface, that is easily and simply maintained.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a protective bib including a bib form which defines a pocket that contains a sheaf of disposable napkins which are held in position as a result of a mating relationship with the bib form and are easily and simple removed one at a time.

One further object of the present invention is to provide a disposable bib napkin including an absorbent surface as of cellulose material that may be backed by a wax paper.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following taken in conjunction with the drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a bib structure constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a vertical sectional view taken along 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged sectional view taken along line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line 44 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of a section of the bib of FIGURE 1 showing a portion thereof in detail;

FIGURE 6 is a vertical sectional view taken through the length of the bib of FIGURE 1 showing the plane 7 interior thereof;

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of a bib as shown in FIGURE 1, incorporating a further protective shield; and

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of a portion of the protective shield as shown in FIGURE 7.

Referring initially to FIGURE 1, there is shown a bib body B having ties T extending from the upper end of the bib to fasten the bib body B to the wearers chest. The bib body B contains a pocket P, the exterior or front wall W of which is exposed'when the bib is worn, being formed of ridged plastic material defining an array of diamond-shaped apertures so as to somewhat expose the upper sheet of a sheaf S of disposable napkins.

In using the bib as shown in FIGURE 1, the ties T are employed to tie the bib about the wearers neck and on his chest, so that food dropped from his mouth is received at the bib.and directed and trapped by the diamond-shaped apertures. After the bib has been used, the upper sheet in the sheaf S may be pulled from the pocket P through an access opening at the bottom of the bib body B. Thus, the structure is effective in use and neat and clean to maintain.

Considering the exemplary embodiment of the present invention in greater detail, the body includes a back panel 20 (FIGURE 2) that may be formed of various sheet material as woven fabric or film plastic. The panel 20 as shown is somewhat violin shaped, including generally 3 circular sections 22 and 24 mated at a waist 26 duced Width.

The panel 20 has a circular aperture 28 to receive the neck of the wearer, which aperture is open at the top to form upper ends 30 and 32.

The outer edges of the panel 20 are joined to the mating edges of a similarly-shaped apertured front panel 38 that may be formed of plastic sheet with molded ridges 39 and containing upright diamond-shaped apertures 41, or other materials may be used which are generally not absorbent and are relatively strong. The mating of the rear panel 20 and the front panel 38 along edge joints 4%) and 42 may be accomplished by a plastic lap seam 44 as best shown in FIGURE 3, which seam 44 along with thread 54 joins the edges of the panels so as to provide a shallow space between the panels 20 and 38 thereby defining the pocket P between these members. At the lower end of the bib, the seam 44 is joined only to the front panel 38 with a semi-circular section 34, which defines an internal semi-circular pocket 35.

The seam 44 may be integrally formed with the ties T extending from the ends 30 and 32 for afiixing the bib. The rear panel 20 is also joined to the front panel 38 by a lap seam 46 which traverses the border of the aperture 28 (FIGURE 4). The lap seams 44 and 46 may be made of tape-shape plastic sheet. Thus, the pocket P provides a fiat cavity of substantially the same area as the bib body B, which cavity is exposed through the diamond apertures 41 as well as through a bottom opening 48.

The pocket P receives a sheaf S comprising an aligned stack of paper sheets 50 as shown in FIGURE 2. The sheaf S is also generally violin shaped, so that it mates with the irregularities in the pocket P. That is, the sheaf S has irregularities in the form of internal curves 52 and 54 which curves received mating internal curves formed in the pocket P. Thus, the sheaf S is held in position and prevented from slipping out from the opening 48. In this regard, the lower portion of the sheaf S may be tucked into the internal pocket 35 for additional support if necessary. of the rear panel 20 may also be tucked into the pocket 35 to provide a better closure.

In the manufacture of bibs as disclosed herein, the front panel 38 may be variously formed as by stamp cutting from ridged plastic film. Thereafter, the section 34 may be folded back on the panel and the seam 44 partly sewn along the edge to form the internal pocket 35. The rear panel 20 (which may also be stamp cut) is then joined to the front panel 38 by the continuation of the seam 44 which terminates in the ties T of the big structure. The seam 46 may then complete the joining of the panels. After the body B is thus complete, sheaf S may be bent slightly and inserted in the pocket P in mating relationship, so that the irregularities in the body B maintain the sheaf S in position.

In using the bib structure of the present invention, the ties T are employed to enclose the wearers neck in the aperture 28. In this regard, it is to be noted that the seam 46 is of sufficient width to provide a comfortable fit adjacent the wearers neck. As previously described, the front panel 38 comprises a material which is not absorbent, so that the food falls onto the bib to be carried by groves or ridges 39 and diamond-shaped apertures 40, and thus is caught and held. In this regard, the sheets 50 exposed through the panel 38 will normally be formed of fibrous material as paper napkins, which readily take up food particles, pastes and liquids.

Thus in using the bib of the present invention, crumbs and food particles are directed and trapped in and by the diamond-shaped apertures and the walls 57 along with the ridges 39 in the front panel for simple and easy removal. Also, the top sheet in the sheaf S may be easily removed when soiled. In this regard, the individual sheets 50 may comprise various materials however, in

of re- In this regard further, the lower portion one embodiment, laminated absorbent paper backed with a waxed paper has been found satisfactory.

In addition to using the bib of the present invention during feeding, it is also useful for a drooling child, upon Whom it is desirable to place a bib for a rather extensive period of use. In such use of the bib, it is desirable that the wet bib not contact the child and furthermore that the bib be rather absorbent yet strong to withstand a reasonable period of use. The bib body B of the present invention may be employed in this use to effectively preserve the child dry and neat.

In some situations of bib use, it is desirable to provide even greater protection than is afforded by the bib of FIGURE 1, at which times the bib may be used in conjunction with an additional napkin K as shown in FIG- URE 7. In this regard, the napkin K may comprise one of the sheets 50 from the sheaf S as shown in FIG- URE 6, or may comprise a different cover napkin K as shown in FIGURE 7, each of which should be understood to comprise a part of the present invention. Referring to FIGURE 7, the bib body B substantially as described above is provided with an external napkin K which is variously shaped to generally conform to the bib body B and formed of laminated material including an external or upper layer 60 of absorbent material as cellulose and a base or bottom layer 62 formed of continuous wax film for example, with the two layers bonded together. The napkin K as shown in FIGURES 7 and 8 has upper tabs 64 and 66 which are cut to define a pair of slits 68 through which the ties T may be passed. Therefore, the bib body B may be used in this special application by inserting the ties T through the slits 68 with the absorbent surface of the napkin K exposed. The child using the bib as shown in FIGURE 7 is then protected by a structure which is not easily torn off because of the ties T and the backing function of the bib body B and which reserves him dry as a result of the backing nature of the bib body B and the film layer 64 in the napkin K, and still further is easily used by simply disposing of the napkin K after a period of use.

Thus, it may be seen, that important features of the present invention reside in the provision of an effective protective surface, which is easily changed, and which is therefore substantially trouble free in use.

Other important features of the present invention will be readily apparent from a consideration of the above exemplification of the invention; however, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to such form but rather the scope of the invention shall be interpreted in accordance with the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A protective bib structure, as for use on children to receive and retain food particles and the like, comprising:

a back sheet of flexible material adapted to be over the area of the child that is to be protected, said back sheet being shaped to define opposed internal curved side edges at approximately midlength whereby to provide a section of reduced width therein;

a front sheet of flexible material matingly shaped with said back sheet and in part edge fixed to said back sheet whereby to provide a pocket between said back sheet and said front sheet, said front sheet defining diamond-shaped apertures of substantial area therethrough to receive and pass food and the like;

a flap of flexible material affixed to said front sheet and said back sheets for overlappingly closing said pocket;

a sheaf of napkins in stacked alignment withinsaid pocket, said napkins matingly shaped with said pocket and including an absorbent surface facing said front sheet and a continuous film surface facing said back sheet; and

means for aflixing said bib structure as defined, to

said child.

5 6 2. A protective bib structure, as for use on children pocket and including an absorbent surface facing to receive and retain food particles and the like, comsaid front sheet and a continuous film surface facing prising: said back sheet; and

a back sheet of flexible material adapted to be over a pair of ties affixed to said front and back sheets opthe area of the child that is to be protected, said back 5 posed said flap, to affix said bib structure as defined sheet being shaped to define opposed internal curved to said child. side edges at approximately midlength whereby to provide a section of reduced width therein; References Cited y the Examine! a front sheet of flexible material matingly shaped with UNITED STATES PATENTS said back sheet and in part edge fixed to said back 10 sheet whereby to provide a pock t tw n Said back 1 g u sheet and said front sheet, said fro t Sheet defining 2244656 6/1941 5 2 49 cut diamond-shaped apertures of substantial area 2269365 1/1942 Fowler 5 therethrough whereby to efiecti y p food P 2424000 7/1947 Shanker ticles through said front she 15 6 6/1951 Stephens 2 53 a flap of flexible material afiiXed t0 S from Sheet 2 94 199 11/1954 s d 2 49 and said back sheets for overlappingly closing said 2:838:758 53 Townley 2 49 pocket; a sheaf of napkins in stacked alignment within said JORDAN FRANKLIN Exammer' pocket, said napkins matingly shaped with said 20 A. R. GUEST, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US889073 *May 15, 1906May 26, 1908Mildred Webber WalbridgeInfant's bib.
US1391121 *Oct 28, 1919Sep 20, 1921Keppel Charles JGarment-protector
US2244656 *Nov 9, 1939Jun 10, 1941Sunny AschChild's bib
US2269365 *Jun 3, 1940Jan 6, 1942Fowler Grace LDress shield
US2424000 *May 12, 1944Jul 15, 1947Shanker Meyer WProtecting and restraining garment
US2556231 *Jun 25, 1949Jun 12, 1951Stephens Priscilla MDress shield
US2694199 *Mar 26, 1951Nov 16, 1954Carolyn Sanders LucileBib
US2838758 *Jan 5, 1955Jun 17, 1958Townley Bernard RProtective device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4620323 *Oct 18, 1985Nov 4, 1986Marla TepperDisposable baby bib
US4884299 *Mar 8, 1985Dec 5, 1989Connie RoseDisposable bibs, packaging and affixing tabs
US4924528 *Dec 8, 1988May 15, 1990Trombetti Dickens PamelaNursing bib
US5715542 *Jun 20, 1996Feb 10, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyBib having an improved fastener
US5819314 *Nov 3, 1997Oct 13, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyBib having concave side edges
US5822792 *Jul 30, 1997Oct 20, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyBib having an improved neck opening
US5887278 *Jan 31, 1997Mar 30, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable bib having notched tear resistance
US6058506 *Jun 17, 1997May 9, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyBib having improved pocket
US6125471 *Apr 14, 1998Oct 3, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable bib having an extensible neck opening
US6266820Apr 14, 1998Jul 31, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable bib having stretchable shoulder extensions
US6308333 *Apr 11, 2000Oct 30, 2001Valarie D. JacksonDisposable bib
US6363530Oct 10, 1997Apr 2, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable bib
US6799330 *Apr 29, 2003Oct 5, 2004Julia B. LansdellInfant bib
US7100211 *Apr 21, 2003Sep 5, 2006Bruffett Lynda LBib having an internal pocket for storing items
US7104976 *Aug 29, 2003Sep 12, 2006Allen Sr Josephus DSanitary device for men and method of using
USH1738 *Jan 5, 1995Jul 7, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyTear resistant disposable bib
WO1986005076A1 *Feb 21, 1986Sep 12, 1986Constance R RoseDisposable babies bibs, related packaging and affixing tabs
WO1998016126A1 *Sep 22, 1997Apr 23, 1998Procter & GambleBib having concave side edges
WO2011028911A1 *Sep 2, 2010Mar 10, 2011Jewison Paul AProtective bib
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/49.2, D02/861, 2/49.3
International ClassificationA41B13/00, A41B13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA41B2400/52, A41B13/10
European ClassificationA41B13/10