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Publication numberUS3286851 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 22, 1966
Filing dateNov 6, 1964
Priority dateNov 6, 1964
Publication numberUS 3286851 A, US 3286851A, US-A-3286851, US3286851 A, US3286851A
InventorsSpery John R
Original AssigneeSun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cargo handling rig
US 3286851 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 22, 1966 J. R. SPERG CARGO HANDLING RIG 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 6, 1964 i x i INVENTOR.

JOHN R. SPERG BY FIG. I.

ATTORNEYS Nov. 22, 1966 J. R. SPERG CARGO HANDLING RIG Filed Nov. 6, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 I46 28 Q I h 46 l I f I a 1 INVENTOR JOHN R. SPERG F l G. 2.

ATTORNEYS Nov. 22, 1966 J. R. SPERG CARGO HANDLING RIG 3 Sheet -s 5 as /F I s. 3.

FIG. 5, INVENTOR JOHN R. SPERG BY EF 4.441 V W-g{ ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,286,851 CARGO HANDLING RIG John R. Sperg, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor to Sun Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, Chester, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Nov. 6, 1964, Ser. No. 409,356 3 Claims. (Cl. 212-3) This invention relates to a cargo handling rig which is particularly suitable for shipboard use.

It is frequently desired to employ a single boom which is capable of working a hatch forward of the boom and a hatch aft of the boom. This is particularly the case when it is desired to provide a ship with but a single heavy lift boom having, for example, a capacity of 80 tons and yet it is desired to have a heavy lift boom available for more than one cargo hold. United States Patents No. 3,107,790, 2,914,193, 3,042,222, and 3,110; 403 are illustrative of the development of cargo handling rigs to serve two holds. As will be readily apparent, the central problem in such rigs is in the structure of the cargo falls to provide for its use both when the boom is working the hold forward of it and when the boom is working the hold aft of it. The heretofore known rigs are either expensive and/ or difficult to operate. The rig of this invention is at once inexpensive and very simple to operate.

The invention and its objects will be fully clarified on reading the following description in conjunction with the drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a transverse elevation partially broken away of an embodiment of the cargo handling rig in accordance with the invention with the boom extending slightly aft;

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal elevation partially broken away of the cargo handling rig of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged transverse elevation partially broken away showing elements of the cargo falls of the rig of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal elevation partially broken away of the cargo falls elements of FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 5 is a transverse elevation partially broken away showing the cargo falls blocks of the rig of FIG- URE l with the blocks separated.

A cargo ship main deck 2 has cargo hatches 4 and 6 longitudinally adjacent to a winch house 8 and a cargo hatch 10 at opposite ends of winch house 8. Kingposts 12 and 14 which are on suitable form of masts are located on the port and starboard side of winch house 8 and have supported on the top thereof swivel members 16 and 18 which pivot on a vertical axis and to which topping lift kingpost blocks 20 and 22 are respectively pivotally secured for pivoting on a horizontal axis. Upper topping lift blocks 28 and 30 by means of swivel eyes 28' and 30, respectively, to allow axial rotation are respectively connected to pendants 32 and 34 which in turn are pivotally connected to shackles 36 and 38 which respectively engage openings 40 and 42 in boom head member 44 of boom 46 in which the shackles are free to swing from side to side as well as up and down.

Boom 46 which may, for example, be a heavy lift boom is mounted at its heel between kingposts 12 and 14 for universal movement in the conventional manner being mounted for pivotal movement about a horizontal axis on support 48 which is mounted for free rotation on a vertical axis on a boom pedestal 52 mounted on top of winch house 8.

Wire cable 54 is secured to block 28 and reeved through blocks 20 and 28 and passes about sheave 56 which is carried by member 57 pivotally secured on a vertical axis to support member 58 fixedly secured to kingpost 12 and thence downwardly to topping lift winch 3,286,851 PatentedNov. 22, 1966 60. Wire cable 64 is secured to block 30 and is reeved through blocks 22 and 30, and passes about sheave 66 secured to support member 67 which is pivotally secured in a vertical axis to support member 68 which is fixedly secured to kingpost 14. Cable 64 passes downwardly from sheave 66 to topping lift winch 70.

The above described structure is essentially conventional for a number of heretofore known heavy lift cargo rigs which are employed with a forward and an after cargo hold. It is, for example, substantially the same as described in W. T. Sparrow Patent No. 3,110,403.

The novel cargo falls will now be described. A multiple sheave and a multiple sheave 82 are respectively secured to opposite sides of boom 46 and are respectively associated with cargo falls blocks 88 and 90. As best seen in FIGURE 3, block 88 has secured thereto a pair of plates 92 and 94. A pair of plates 96 and 97 (FIG- URE 4) are welded to plates 92 and 94 and are provided with openings (not shown) which are engaged by shackle 100 holding a pendant 102. Similarly, block 90 has secured thereto a pair of plates 104 and 106 which in turn have welded thereto a pair of plates 108 and 109 having openings (not shown) for the reception of a shackle 110 which supports a pendant 112. The lower looped end of pendants 102 and 112 are shackled together by a shackle 114 which may be employed to engage a sling, cargo net or the like containing the cargo to be lifted.

A tubular male member 118 having a beveled end 119 is welded to plate 106 and is adapted to enter tubular female member 120 which is welded to plate 92. The insertion of member 118 into member 120 maintains the same spread between blocks 88 and 90 as between multiple sheaves 80 and 82 at boom head and prevents unequal loading in the cargo falls.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, a wire cable 126 is wound on Winch 128 and passes around a sheave 130 and upwardly about sheave 132 which is secured to a support member 133 which in turn is pivotally secured on a vertical axis to support member 134- which is fixedly secured to kingpost 14. Cable 126 then passes upwardly through fair lead block 138 which is secured to multiple sheave assembly 80 by swivel eye bar 140 and pin 142 (FIGURE 3). Cable 126 is then reeved through block 88 and sheave 80. It is led from multiple sheave assembly 80 around horizontal equalizing sheave 144 (FIGURE 4) mounted on the boom head and thence is reeved through multiple sheave assembly 82 and block 90. Cable 126 passes from block 90 through fair lead block 146 which is secured to multiple sheave assembly 82 by swivel eye bar 148 and pin 150 and thence about sheave 152 which is secured to support member 153 which is pivotally secured on a vertical axis to support member 156 which is fixedly secured to kingpost 12. Cable 126 then passes over sheave 158 and is wound onto winch 160.

In normal operation, blocks 88 and 90 are held together by the horizontal components of hook load and the spread between blocks is maintained by members 118 and 120, the boom 46 being topped to the desired location by the operation of topping lift winches 60 and 70 and the associated topping lift gear. Thus assuming the boom to be in the position shown in FIGURES l and 2, if it is desired to work hatch 4, cables 54 and 64 are paid out from winches 60 and 70 until boom 46 is in the desired position with shackles 114 over, for example, the sling to be engaged and hoisted. Blocks 88 and 90 and shackle 114 are then lowered by paying out cable 126 from winches 128 and 160 until shackle 114 can be attached to the load. Blocks 88 and 90 are then hoisted by taking in cable 126 by both winches 128 and 160 to lift the load. Equalizing sheave 144 permits the use of only one winch but the use of both winches better equalizes the load in the tackle. After the load is hoisted, winches 60 and 70 are employed in the conventional manner to spot boom 46 so that the load can be lowered over either the. port or starboard side,

for example, to a dock.

to the positions shown in FIGURE 5. A line 170 is then secured to the lower end of pendant 112 and to a pad eye 172 secured to the opposite end of the winch house and a line 174 is secured to pendant 102 and to a pad eye 176 secured to the opposite end of thewinch.

house. Winches'128 and 160'are now operated to reel in cable 126 which elevates blocks 88 and 90 and tightens up on lines 170 and 174 spreading apart blocks 88 and 90 to clear boom 46 and then pulling boom 36 from the position slightly aft of the vertical as shown in FIGURE 2 to a position slightly forward of the vertical as shown in phantom in'FIGURE 2. Lines 170 and 174 are then removed and shackle 114 or other suitable tackle is secured to pendants 102 and 112. The boom 46 may then be spottedwhere desired by the operation of topping lift winches 60 and 70. To shift the ,boom from a forward hatch to an after hatch, for example, from hatch 10 to hatch 4, the reverse operation is carried out with the exception that pad eyes 178and 180 which are secured to the other end of the winch house are employed.

It will be understood that the foregoing description is by way of illustration. and not intended to be limiting.

What is claimed is:

1. Cargo handling apparatus comprising a boom having its heel mounted for universal movement, mast means mounted on either side of said boom heel, boom topping lift means connected to the boom head and said mast means for positioning the boom and a pairof cargo fall purchases having one of the purchases depending from one side of the boomhead and the other of the purchases depending from the other side of the boom head, each purchase comprising a lower block and an upper block which is mounted adjacent the boom head, line means reeved through said purchases, winch means operatively connected to said line means, and means to connect together the lower purchase blocks comprising a projecting ber for the reception of the projecting member on the other lower purchase block.

2. Cargo handling apparatus comprising a boom having its heel mounted for universal movement, mast means mounted on either side of said boom heel, boom topping lift means connected to the boom head and said mast means for positioning the boom over hatches forward and aft of the mast means, a pair of cargo fall purchases comprising a pair of sheave means mounted on opposite sides of the boom head and down the boom from the points of connection of the topping lift means to the boom and a pair of lower purchase blocks, means to removably connect together the lower purchase blocks, equalizing sheave means at the boom head, a pair of lead blocks mounted on opposite sides of the boom head and down the boom from the points of connection of the topping lift means to the. boom, a pair of winches, and a line having its free ends respectively wound on the winches and sequentially extending fromone winch, be-

low one topping lift, and through one lead block, reeved through one of the purchases, the equalizing sheave means, and the other purchase, and extending through the other lead block, below the other topping lift and thence to the other winch. 7

3. Cargo handling apparatus in accordance m'th claim 2 in which the means to connect together the lower purchase blocks comprises a projecting member on one of the lower purchase blocks and a hollow member for the reception of the projecting member on the other'of the lower purchase blocks.

References Cited by the Examiner. UNITED STATES PATENTS ANDRES H. NIELSEN, Primary Examiner.

SAMUEL F. COLEMAN, EVON C. BLUNK,

Examiners. A. L. LEVINE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1165363 *Dec 30, 1910Dec 21, 1915Lidgerwood Mfg CoMultiple sheave-block.
US1436608 *Aug 10, 1921Nov 21, 1922Rodier Robert SBlock and tackle apparatus
US1765347 *Jul 7, 1928Jun 17, 1930Shepard Niles Crane & Hoist CoCrane hoist
US2960310 *Apr 10, 1959Nov 15, 1960Alliance Machine CoDual hook blocks
US3042222 *Apr 13, 1959Jul 3, 1962Lehmann Guenther WCargo boom
US3050286 *Sep 18, 1957Aug 21, 1962Boston & Lockport Block CoPulley block
US3236390 *Oct 2, 1964Feb 22, 1966H C Stulcken SohnShip's cargo boom with pendulum purchase block fitting
GB937115A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3365074 *Sep 28, 1966Jan 23, 1968Dry Dock CompanyCargo handling apparatus
US3375937 *Apr 24, 1967Apr 2, 1968Newport News S & D CoCargo handling apparatus
US3777901 *Jan 10, 1972Dec 11, 1973Speedcranes LtdDerrick cranes
US3828938 *Dec 20, 1972Aug 13, 1974M GlushkoLuffing crane
US4666362 *May 7, 1985May 19, 1987Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyParallel link manipulators
US7172385Jul 9, 2003Feb 6, 2007Amir KhajepourLight weight parallel manipulators using active/passive cables
US7367771Jan 23, 2007May 6, 2008Amir KhajepourLight weight parallel manipulators using active/passive cables
US7367772Jan 23, 2007May 6, 2008Amir KhajepourLight weight parallel manipulators using active/passive cables
DE1531610B1 *Sep 30, 1967Mar 12, 1970Blohm Voss AgSchiffsladevorrichtung mit einem zwischen zwei Pfosten hindurchschwingbaren,gelenkig an Deck gelagerten Ladebaum
Classifications
U.S. Classification212/310, 212/271, 212/242
International ClassificationB66C23/00, B66C23/60
Cooperative ClassificationB66C23/605
European ClassificationB66C23/60B