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Publication numberUS3286901 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 22, 1966
Filing dateFeb 1, 1965
Priority dateFeb 1, 1965
Publication numberUS 3286901 A, US 3286901A, US-A-3286901, US3286901 A, US3286901A
InventorsWilbur G Anderson
Original AssigneePackaging Corp America
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container construction
US 3286901 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1966 w. G. ANDERSON 3,286,901

I CONTAINER CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 1, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 N 1966 w. G. ANDERSON 3,286,901

CONTAINER CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 1, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet Z5 United States Patent 3,286,901 CONTAINER CONSTRUCTION Wilbur G. Anderson, Grand Rapids, Mich., asslgnor, by

mesne assignments, to Packaging Corporation of America, a corporation of Delaware Filed Feb. 1, 1965, Ser. No. 429,276 10 Claims. (Cl. 229-43) This invention relates to a container and blank therefor and more particularly to a shipping container adapted for use in accommodating weighty objects such as bearings, castings and the like.

Various containers of this general type, normally referred to as high density shipping containers, have heretofore been produced; however, because of various design characteristics they have been beset with numerous shortcomings, such as for example high cost, difl'icult to set up, and inefiective to withstand abusive handlin when loaded. Furthermore, in containers of this type, opening and reclosing thereof oftentimes becomes an awkward and frustrating operation.

Thus, it is one of the objects of this invention to provide a container which overcomes the shortcomings which have heretofore beset prior structures.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a container, the interior of which is accessible from either end, without damaging the container and thus, enables the container to be readily reclosed.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a container blank which results in a minimum of material waste. 7

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a container the setting up of which may be readily accomplished either manually or by mechanical means.

Further and additional objects will appear from the description, accompanying drawings, and appended claims.

In accordance with one embodiment of this invention a container is provided which is formed of foldable material and includes a pair of traylike sections which are disposed in superimposed relation. Each sec tion has a base portion delimited by upright wall portions. At least one of the sections has opposed wall portions of multi-ply construction whereby open end pockets are formed between the plies of each multi-ply wall portion. The other section has at least one flap foldably connected to one of the wall portions thereof. The flap is provided with a pair of end tabs foldably connected to opposite ends of the flap. The flap is disposed in face to face relation with a wall portion of the one section which is disposed intermediate the multiply wall portions thereof and the end tabs of the flap are folded relative thereto and disposed within the corresponding open-end pockets.

For a more complete understanding of this invention reference should be made to the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the blank for one form of a traylike section.

FIGS. 2 and 3 are perspective views of the blank of FIG. 1 shown in progressive stages of set-up.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a set-up section formed from the blank of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of an im-. proved high density shipping container embodying the invention in question.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the container shown in FIG. 5 with the upper traylike section pivoted to an ice FIG. 9 is a fragmentary end view of a modified container showing a flap thereof in partially closed position.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIG. 5, one form of an improved high density shipping container 10 is shown with the component parts thereof disposed in exploded relation. A high density shipping container is commonly known in the packaging industry as a container capable of being used for the shipment of very 'heavy articles such as bearings and castings.

The illustrated container 10 comprises three basic parts, a lower traylike sect-ion 11, an upper traylike section 12, and an intermediate section 13 which is disposed within and encompassed by said upper and lower sections.

In container 10 the upper and lower sections are preferably of like construction and may be formed from a blank 14 having a configuration as shown in FIG. 1. Sections 1113 are also preferably formed from doublefaced corrugated fibreboard material.

In view of the fact that sections 11 and 12 are of like construction only section ll will be described in detail. Section 11 as seen in FIG. 4 includes a base portion 15, wall portions 16, 117, 18 and 20 which extend upwardly from the periphery of base portion 15, and -a flap 21 which is .foldably connected to the upper edge of wall portion 20. The various panels which cooperate to form wall portions 16- 20 are seen more clearly in the blank 14 shown in FIG. 1. Base portion 15 in the illustrated embodiment is rectangular in shape. Foldably connected to the elongated sides of portion 15 "are outer panels 16a and 18a. Foldably connected, in turn, to the outer elongated edge of each outer panel 16a or 18a is an inner panel 16b or 18b.

Each inner panel 16b or 18b cooperates with the corresponding outer panel 16a or 18a to form an upright, multi-ply wall portion 16 or 18, when the blank is set up to form the traylike section 11 or 12. The method, or procedure, followed in setting up the blank will be discussed more fully hereinafter.

Foldably connected to and laterally extending from each inner panel 16b and 18b are end panels 16c or 18c. Centrally disposed on the outer edge of each inner panel 16b or 18b is a projection 16d or 18d. Each projection is adapted to interlock with a slit, slot, or depression 15a or 15b, formed in base portion 15, when the blank is set up and thus retain wall portions 16 and 18 in erected positions.

It will be noted in FIG. 1 that the outer and inner panels of each Wall portion 16 or 18 are interconnected by double foldlines 162 or 1-8e. The spacing between the foldlines comprising each double foldline is [for a purpose to be described more fully hereinafter.

Foldably connected to the short sides of base portion 15 are panels 17a and 20a, each of which forms the outer panel of wall portion 17 or 20. Foldably connected to and extending laterally from the ends of panels 17a and 20a are end panels 171; and 20b. Each end panel 17b or 20b is separated from outer panels 16a and 18a by cuts 22.

Flap 21, as seen in FIG. 1. is foldably connected to the outer edge of outer panel 20a. Foldably connected to and extending laterally from the opposite ends of flap 21 are end tabs 21a and 21b.

In setting up the blank 14 to form an erected traylike section 11 or 12, the panels 171: and 20a are folded to upright positions and the respective end panels 17b and 20b are folded inwardly so as to align themselves with the elongated sides of base portion 15, see FIG. 2. As seen in FIG. 3, while panels 17a-b and 20a-b are so disposed panels 16a and 18a are moved to upright positions and the inner panels 16b and 18b are folded the projections 16d and 18d engage the slits'lSa and b. It will be noted that end panels 17b and 20b are sandwiched between inner and outer panels 16a-b and 18a-b sections 11 and 12.

Itwill be noted in FIG. 4 that end panels 160 and 180 overlie the inner surfaces of outer panels 17a and 20a. Panels 16c and 180 when in such positions have the outer distal'edges thereof in abutting relation and thus, assist in retaining inner panels 16b and 18b in their upright folded positions. In the illustrated embodiment shown in FIG. 4 it will be noted that all the wall portions are of double thickness of the blank material. If double thickness of material is not required for all the wall portions, end panels 16c and 18c may be eliminated.

In FIG. 4 there is shown the open end pockets23 and 24 which are formed at the opposite ends of the multiply wall portions 16 and 18, respectively. The spacing between the foldlines comprising each double-foldline 16e or 18e is such as to insure that the open-end pockets 23 and 24 will be formed in the erected traylike section 11 The intermediate section 13 may take a variety of forms, dependent in part upon the type of article being packaged in the container. For example, section 13 may take the form of a conventional rectangularly shaped box having a pair of opposed large side panels 13a and a pair of opposed narrow side panels 13b foldably connected thereto so as to form a tubular member. Foldable flaps 130 may be provided at either, or both, the top and bottom of the tubular member so as to effect closing thereof. When the container is assembled, the intermediate section 13 will fit snugly within the interior of sections 11 and 12. The vertical dimension of the side panels 13a and b is preferably equal to the sum of the interior vertical dimensions of the corresponding panels of the sections when the latter are in superposed relation.

In FIG. 9, a modified intermediate section 13' is shown whereby the vertical dimension of the section 13'a is sections 11 or 12 may be provided with a flap, similar to flap 21 or 21 at each end of the tray rather than at just -and thus effect reinforcing of the corners of the traylike greater than the sum of the interior vertical dimensions I of the corresponding panels of the cooperating sections 11' and 12'. When intermediate section 13 is utilized, the lower and upper sections 11 and 12' are modified slightly in regard to the flap 21" whereby the dimension thereof taken normal to the foldline connection between the flap 21. and the outer end panel 20'a is equal to the height of the outer end panel 20'a of the other traylike section plus the difference in vertical dimension between the intermediate section 13' and the outer end panel 20'a to which said flap is connected.

Once the end tabs 21a and b of the sections 11 and 12 are fully inserted within the corresponding open end pockets of the adjacent section, see FIG. 7, the container is in fully closed condition. The end tabs are normally retained in the pockets by friction, however, if desired, tape may be applied over the open end pockets subsequent to the tabs being inserted therein.

When both sections 11 and 12 or 11' and 12' are provided with flaps 21 or 21, the closed container may be readily opened at either end by merely withdrawing the end tabs at the selected container end from the open end pockets and then causing the upper section to pivot open about the foldline connection between the other flap and the outer end panel. v desired, the intermediate section 13 or 13 may be omitted from the interior of the container where lighter weight articles are being packaged. In the case of the modified container 10', shown in FIG. 9, theomission of least one flap foldably connected to a wall portion and section 13' would cause partial exposure of the article one end as shown. In such a container construction, the other section would be void of flap 21 and therefore the end tabs formed on the pair of flaps of the first section would be inserted in the open end pocketsat either. end of the other section. If the vertical dimensions of the pair of flaps on the first mentioned section were similar to that shown in FIG. 9, the container, once empty of the product, may have the traylike sections arranged in spaced superimposed relation and with the open side of each traylike section facing upwardly, whereby such sections may function as stacked storage bins or trays Thus, it is apparent that a most versatile container has been provided which is capable of providing protection for weighty, as well as light weight, products; does not require staples, adhesive, or the like to retain the container in a closed condition. Furthermore, the container is readily and effectively reclosable, and may be easily opened at either end. The blank configuration is simple, results in a minimum of waste material, and is readily adapted to be set up either manually or mechanically.

While several embodiments have heretofore been disclosed and claimed, the invention is not intended to be limited thereto as further modifications are contemplated, and the submitted claims are deemed to be of sufficient scope to cover such further modifications.

I claim:

1. A container formed of foldable material comprising a pair of traylike sections disposed in superimposed relation, each section having a base portion delimited by upright wall portions, at least one of said sections having wall portions of 'multi-ply construction whereby pockets are formed between the plies of said multi-ply wall portions, openings to said pockets being spaced apart, the second of said sections having at least one flap foldably connected to one of said wall portions, said flap being provided with a pair of end tabs foldably connected to opposite ends of said flap; said flap being in face-to-face relation with the one section Wall portion intermediate said spaced apart openings to said pockets, and said end tabs are folded relative 'to said flap and inserted through said openings into said pockets of said other section.

2. A container formed of foldable material comprising a pair of traylike first sections disposed in inverted superimposed relation and with the open sides of said sections adjacent one another, and a second section encompassed by and disposed intermediate said pair of first sectionsj each first section having a base portion and upright Wall portions delimiting said base portion and in contact with said second section; at least one of said first'sections having a pairof opposed wall portions provided with open end pockets, the other of said first sections having at provided'with a pair of end tabs foldably connected to opposite ends of said flap, said flap being in face-to-face 1 relation with the exterior surface .of the one section wall portion intermediate said pair of pocketed wall portions and having the tabs folded relative to said flap and disposed within the corresponding open-end pockets of said other first section; said second section having a plurality of wall panels disposed in face-to-face engagement with the interiorsurfaces of the corresponding wall .portions of said superimposed firstsections.

3. The container recited in claim 2 wherein said second section is provided with a plurality of closure flaps foldablyxconnected to the corresponding ends of said wall panels.

formed intermediate the plies.

5 The container recited in claim2 wherein said second section has the same number of wall panels as each first sec-tion has wall portions, said second section includes a plurality of closure flaps foldably connected to opposite ends of said wall panels, said closure flaps, when in folded relation, engaging the interior surface of the base portion of each of said superimposed first sections.

6. A container formed of foldable material comprising a pair of traylike sections disposed in superimposed relation, each section having a base portion delimited by upright wall portions, at least one of said sections having a pair of opposed wall portions provided with open end pockets formed by multiple wall portions, the second of said sections having at least one flap foldably connected to one of said Wall portions, said flap being provided with a pair of foldable tabs, said flap being in face-to-face relation with the exterior surface of a Wall portion of said one section disposed intermediate said pair of pocketed wall portions, and said tabs are folded relative to said flap and disposed within the corresponding open end pockets and efiect retention of said sections in said superimposed relation.

7. A container comprising a traylike bottom section and an inverted traylike cover section arranged in superimposed relation therewith, one end of said bottom section being provided with a foldable first flap overlying the exterior surface of the corresponding end of said cover section and being releasably connected thereto, the opposite end of said bottom section having the exterior surface thereof overlaid by a second flap foldably connected to the corresponding opposite end of said cover section, said second flap being releasably connected to the corresponding opposite end of said bottom section, said cover and bottom sections being movable relative to the other about either of the foldable flaps as an axis when the other flap is in a released position.

8. The container recited in claim 7 wherein the cover and bottom sections are of like configuration.

9. The container recited in claim 7 including a third section disposed intermediate said cover and bottom sections and encompassed thereby, said third section being removable from between said cover and bottom sections only when at least one of said foldable flaps is in a released position.

10. A blank of foldable sheet material for use in forming a traylike container capable of releasably interlocking with a like container to form a closed shipping package, said blank including a base panel, exterior side wall panels foldably connected to opposite first marginal portions of said base panel, end wall panels foldably connected to opposite second marginal portions of said base panel and adapted to cooperate with said exterior side wall panels to form upright walls delimiting said base panel, said second marginal portions being disposed intermediate said first marginal portions, interior side wall panels foldably connected to the outer edges of said exterior side wall panels,the line of fold between said exterior and interior side wall panels being substantially parallel to the line of fold between said exterior side wall panel and said base panel, the outer edge of each interior side wall panel frictionally engaging said base panel, when said blank is set up to form said container, a pair of first flaps foldably connected to opposite ends of said end wall panels, said' first flaps being adapted to be sandwiched between said interior and exterior side wall panels when said blank is set up to form said container, a second flap foldably connected to the outer edge of one of said end walls, the outer edge of said one end wall and the portion of said second flap connected thereto being substantially coextensive, said second flap being adapted to project above the end walls when said blank is set up to form said container, and tabs foldably connected to opposite ends of said second flap, the fold axes of said tabs being substantially perpendicular to the foldline connection between said second flap and said one end panel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 493,545 3/ 1893 Cohen et al 22934 1,497,610 6/ 1924 Surmann 22923 2,3 19,919 5/ 1943 Clark 22934 X 2,859,906 11/ 1958 Guyer 22923 X 2,983,423 5/1961 Vail 22923 3,139,228 6/1964 Wilkins 22934 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

D. T. MOORHEAD, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US493545 *Aug 19, 1892Mar 14, 1893 Packing-box
US1497610 *Jan 7, 1920Jun 10, 1924Surmann Johannes RudolphPacking box
US2319919 *Dec 19, 1940May 25, 1943Inland Container CorpCovered shipping and display box
US2859906 *Mar 7, 1955Nov 11, 1958Waldorf Paper Prod CoTelescoping carton
US2983423 *Oct 20, 1960May 9, 1961Massillon Container CoSelf-locking shipping container
US3139228 *May 4, 1962Jun 30, 1964Reinforced Plastic Container CLaminated structure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4267959 *Oct 22, 1979May 19, 1981Westvaco CorporationHinged paperboard container
US4317536 *Oct 28, 1980Mar 2, 1982Container Corporation Of AmericaTwo-piece container
US4775097 *Sep 18, 1987Oct 4, 1988Abe KatzmanDisplay container
US4852796 *Jun 17, 1988Aug 1, 1989General Motors CorporationDisplay container
US4915291 *Jun 2, 1988Apr 10, 1990Galber Maria APackaging modular envelope including self-sealing closure means
US4971242 *Mar 19, 1990Nov 20, 1990Green Bay Packaging Inc.Multiple container assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/120.1, 229/147, 229/174, 229/178, 229/151, 229/901, 229/125.8
International ClassificationB65D5/22, B65D5/32
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/901, B65D5/321, B65D5/22
European ClassificationB65D5/22, B65D5/32A