Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3287023 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 22, 1966
Filing dateJul 16, 1964
Priority dateJul 16, 1964
Publication numberUS 3287023 A, US 3287023A, US-A-3287023, US3287023 A, US3287023A
InventorsGordon K Ware
Original AssigneeChicago Roller Skate Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roller skate
US 3287023 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 22, 1966 G. K. WARE 3,287,023-

ROLLER SKATE Filed July 16, 1964 K 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

Nov. 22, 1966 G. K. WARE 3,287,023

ROLLER SKATE Filed July 16, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N VENTOR.

United States Patent C) Illinois Filed July 16, 1964, Ser. No. 383,128 8 Claims. (Cl. 280--11.2)

This invention relates to a novel skate structure, and more specifically to a novel roller skate structure.

As will be understo'od, the action and techniques involved -in ice skating are frequently significantly different from those involved in roller skating primarily as the result of the fact that an ice skater balances on a relatively narrow edge of a blade and frequently only on a limited area of the blade edge while a roller skater utilizing co'n- Ventionally available skates balances on a relatively 'broad flat platform provided by four widely spaced wheels having relatively wide at peripheral edges. Thus persons fwho engage in various forms `of ice skating such as racing, figure skating, ice hockey or merely pleasure skating cannot obtain the same action with conventionally available roller skates. Persons interested in ice skating usually have available to them a limited season lduring which they can participate in their chosen sport, which season may be controlled by the weather or the limited availability of indoor ice skating rinks.

An important object of the present invention is to provide a novel skate structure utilizing rollers or wheels constructed and arranged in Ia manner for simulating the act-ion of ice skates.

A futher yobject of the present invention is to provide a novel skate structure utilizing rollers or wheels, which structure may be adjusted for enabling a skater to simulate ice skates used for one or more activities including racing, hockey and figure skating.

Still another important object of the present invention is to provide a fnovel skate structure o'f the above-described type which may lbe readily adjusted for fitting a wide variety of shoe sizes.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel skate structure of the above-described type which vis of simple, rugged and economical construction.

Other objects 1and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. l is a side elevational view showing a skate structure incorporating features of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan View of the skate structure shown in FIG. l;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged partial sectional view taken generally along line 3 3 in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are fragmentary sectional views showing the manner in which wheel elements of the skate structure function during different maneuvers;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view showing Ithe skate structure -in a position for enabling a skater to pivot about a desired point;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational View showing a skate structure incorporating a modified form of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the skate structure shown -in FIG. 7 in a tilted position for engaging a toe stop element with the iioor;

FIG. 9 is a .fragmentary sectional View taken generally yalong line 9-9 in FIG. 10;

AFIG. 9.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings wherein like parts are designated 'by the same numerals through- 3,287,023 Patented Nov. 22, 1966 ICC out the various figures, a skate structure 20 incorporating features of the present invention is shown lin FIGS. 1 through I6. The skate structure comprises opposite side frame means 22 and 24 which are later-ally spaced apart and preferably have the general configuration and appearance of ice skate blades when viewed from the side. The side .frame means 22 and 24 respectively present forward sole plate flanges 26 and 28 and heel plate flanges 30 and 32 .adapted to be riveted or otherwise secured to a Ishoe of known construction, not shown. If desired suitable clamping means, not shown, could be assembled with the sole and heel plate flanges for 4detachably connecting the skate structure to a shoe.

The side frame means 22 comprises forward and rear frame -members presenting longitudinally extending and overlapping blade-like lportions 34 and 36. Strut portions 38 extend upwardly from the blade portion 34 for supporting the sole plate iiange 26 and similar upstanding strut portions 40 extend from the blade portion 36 to the heel plate flange 30. The side frame means 24 is substantially identically but oppositely constructed and includes overlapping front and rear blade portions 42 and 44 and forward upstanding strut portions 46 supporting the sole plate flange 28 and rearwardly disposed upstanding strut port-ions 48 supporting the heel iiange 32.

The skate structure 20 includes a plurality of rollers or wheels 50, 52, 54, and 56 which are all arranged in a straight line in a space 58 between the side frame means 22 and 24. The wheels are respectively mounted on axles `60, 62, 64, and 66 extending between the side frame means and through apertures therein as will be described more fully below. The wheels are all of uniform size, shape and structure so that they may be interchanged if desired.

As shown best in FIG. 3, each of the wheels comprises an annular disc 68 formed of tough, rm but slightly soft and resilient rubber. The outer periphery 70 of the wheel disc 68 has a substantially semicircular cross-sectional configuration and the inner periphery is mounted on a hub 72 having axially spaced annular surfaces 74 and 76 for cooperative engagement with annular series of bal-l ybearings 78 and 80. The lbearings are retained by telescoping and interconnected cone elements 82 and 84.

The axle 62 extends through the cone elements 82 and 84 and has an enlarged head 86 at one end thereof andk is adapted to receive a nut member 88 at its opposite ends for securing the parts in assembled relationship. It is to be noted that the cone elements 82 and 84 have integral portions 90 and 92 projecting beyond opposite sides of the narrow wheel disc 68 for engaging inner surfaces of the opposite frame structures and maintaining predetermined spaces or clearances 94 and 96 between the whee-l disc and the side frame means. As previously indicated the remaining wheels are identical to the wheel 52 and therefore need not be described in detail.

In order to accommodate the axles of the wheels, the side frame means 22 and 24 are provided with aligned apertures as shown best in FIGS. 1 and 6. More specifically the apertures are closely and preferably substantially uniformly spaced along the length of the side frame means 22 and 24 for permitting adjustment of the location of the wheels for purposes mentioned below and the -apertures are arranged into three groups of apertures 98, 100 and 102. In the embodiment shown, the-re are six apertures `98 (9S-1 through 98-6) adjacent forward ends of the side frame means 22 and 24, four apertures 102 (1024 through 102-4) adjacent rear ends of the side frame means and remaining apertures 100 are arranged between the forward and rear groups.

It is important to note that the apertures 100 are formed so that their axes are disposed in a first horizontal plane while the apertures 98 and 102 are located so that their axes are disposed above the axes of the apertures 100. In this embodiment the axes of apertures 98-1, 98-2 and 98-3 are disposed substantially in a second plane inclined with respect to the first mentioned horizontal p-lane so that these apertures are progressively higher in a rearward direction. The apertures 98-4 and 98-5 are preferably in the same horizontal plane as the aperture 98-3. lThe apertures 101-1, 102-2 and V102-3 are also in `an inclined plane, but this plane is disposed so that these apertures progressively increase in height from the trailing end of the skate forwardly. The aperture 1024 is preferably in the same horizontal plane as the aperture 102-3.

The peripheries of the intermediate wheels 52 and S4 project downwardly the same distance since the axles of these wheels extend through apertures 100. Furthermore, the peripheries of the intermediate wheel-s 52 and S4 project below the peripheries of the opposite end wheels 50 and 56 since the axles of the wheels 50 and 56 respectively extend through apertures 98 and 102. With this arrangement only two of the wheels will engage the 'ground or iioor at any one time so that during a skating :motion Va slight rocking action will be obtained which will simulate the action of ice skates which are frequently curved at least slightly upwardly adjacent forward and rear ends thereof. The amount of rocking action may be adjusted by changing the location of the end wheels 50 and 456 in the apertures 98 and 100 for raising `or lowering the end wheels with respect to the intermediate wheels. The arrangement is such that upon ti-lting the skates slightly as shown in FIG. 6, only the wheel 52 will engage the ground for enabling the skater to pivot about the single point of engagement provided by the wheel 52. Again, this action is much the same as can be obtained on ice skates.

As previously indicated and as shown best in FIG. 3, the wheels are formed so that their peripheral edges have a semicircular cross-sectional configuration. Also as previously indicated, the material from which the wheels 68 are formed is tough and firm, yet resiliently yieldable or soft. More specifically it has been found that the rubber material from which the wheels are made preferably has a hardness which may be measured by a Durometer and falls between about 85 on the Durometer A scale and 57 on the Durometer D sca-le. This er1- ables the yrubber wheels to resist flattening sufficiently to roll easily and smoothly while at the same time it enables the peripheral edges of the wheels to flatten slightly under the weight of a skater for providing a flat spot 104 as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 for promoting sufficient frictional engagement or gripping of the floor to resist undue lateral sliding. It will be observed that the flat spot 104 has a width similar in width to conventional ice-skating blades for enabling the skate structure further to simuate the action and feel of an ice skate. The semicircular configuration of the peripheral edge enables the fiat spot i104 to move freely across the skate wheel as the skater tilts the skate between the vertical position shown in FIG. 4 and an inclined position such as that shown in FIG. 5.

As previously indicated, the holes 98, 100l and 102 are preferably uniformly spaced along the opposite side frames 22 and 24. This arrangement permits the overall length of the skate structure to be freely adjusted by removing the intermediate wheels and the axles 62 and 64 and relatively longitudinally shifting the forward and -rear portions of the side frame means relative to each other. When the portions of the side frame means have been adjusted in a desired manner the intermediate wheels are reassembled. Since the axles of the wheels provide the only means securing the side frames together, the front and rear portions of the side frarne means may be freely adjusted relative to each other and the increments of such adjustments are limited only by the spacing of the apertures.

The front and back wheels 50 and 56 may be adjusted relative to the intermediate wheels for changing the -operating characteristics of the skate structure in accordance with the desires of a particular skater and in accordance with the intended use of the skate. For example when it is desired to simulate the relatively long blade of a racing skate, the wheels should be spaced apart a maximum distance as shown in FIGS. l and 6. On the other hand, if it is desired to simulate the action of the relatively short blades of gure skates or hockey skates, one or both of the front and rear wheels 50 and 56 may be moved to positions closer to the intermediate wheels and, if desired, the intermediate wheels may be moved to positions closer together.

During a skating action and particularly when making turns or jumps, the forces applied to the tough but resilient rubber wheels will cause the wheels to twist relative to their axles and the side frame means 22 and 24. In order to prevent the wheels from rubbing against the side frame means during said twisting, the aforementioned extensions and 92 of the wheel bearing cones are constructed so as to cause the spaces 94 and 96 between the wheels and the side frames to be substantial and preferably to be at least about one-fourth as great as the radial distance of the wheel disc 68 between the hub members 72 and the semicircular marginal portions 70. This arrangement has been found sufic-ient to prevent interference between the wheels and the side frame means without unduly increasing the overall width of the frame structure.

As shown best in FIG. 2, the rear portions 36 and 44 of the opposite side frame means are adapted to extend along outer surfaces of the forward portions 42 and 44. Furthermore, the wheels 50, 52 and 54 are normally positioned between the inner surfaces of the portions 34 and 42 while the rear wheel 56 is positioned between inner surfaces of the rear frame means portions 36 and 44. In order to permit the same wheel to be used in all positions, sections 106 and 108 of the frame means portions 44 and 46 are offset inwardly for presenting inner sides or surfaces thereof in the same planes as the inner sides or surfaces of the forward frame means portions 34 and 42. Thus the aforementioned desired clearances are provided between the offset portions 106 and 108 and the rear wheel 56 while at the same time the extensions 90 and 92 of the bearing cone engage the inner surfaces of the frame means sections 106 and `108 in the same manner as the corresponding bearing cones of the forwardly positioned wheels engage the inner surfaces of the side frame means portions 34 and 42.

In FIGS. 6 through 10 a modified embodiment of the present invention is shown, which embodiment is similar to the structure described above as indicated by the application of identical reference numerals with a suffix a added to corresponding elements. This embodiment differs in that the apertures 98a are successively progressively increasingly offset above the horizontal piane containing the axes of the apertures 100a in a direction extending from the apertures 100a toward the forward end of the skate structure. In addition, the apertures 10211 are successively and progressively increasingly offset outwardly from the apertures 10061 in a direction extending toward the rear end of the skate. In other words, the axes of the apertures 98a and 10211 are respectively disposed in planes inclined upwardly from the horizontal plane containing axes of the apertures 10051. With this arrangement, the skate structure 20a will provide for a uniform rockingA action as the forward and rear wheels are adjusted between successive apertures 98a and 102g. In other words, the same amount of inclination of the skate structure is required for engaging the wheels 50a and 52a simultaneously against the ground when the axle of the wheel 50a extends through the aperture 98a closest to the apertures 100:1 as when the axle extends through the outermost aperture 98a.

The skate structure 20a also includes a toe stop assembly 1110. However, it is to be understood that a similar toe stop assembly may be incorporated in the skate structure of the previously described embodiment, if desired.

The toe stop assembly 110 comprises a friction member 112 molded of rubber or any other suitable material around metal inserts 114 and 116. The inserts 114 and 116 are adapted to embrace the forward ends of the side frame portions 34a and 42a. Apertures 118 and 120 are provided through the inserts L14 and 116 and are located for alignment with one of the apertures 98a in the opposite side frames and faced rearwardly of the forwardmost aperture 98a. Fastening means 122 and 124 in the form of rivets or screws and complementary nuts extend through the apertures 118 and 120 and the aligned apertures in the side frame means for pivotally securing the toe stop assembly to the side frame means. As shown in FIG. l0 inner ends of the fastening means 122 and 124 are respectively substantially ush with the inner surfaces of the side frame means for permitting the wheel 50a to be adjusted forwardly from the position shown without interference from the fastening means 122 and 124.

As shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 the inserts 114 and 116 have arcuate portions 126 and 1128 having the common axis of the apertures 118 and 120 as their centers of curvature and presenting inner surfaces engageable with the extreme outer ends of the frame means portions 34a and 42a. Thus the frame means portions provide rigid abutments engageable with and backing up the inserts of the toe stop member while at the same time the toe stop structure may be pivoted about the axis of the apertures 118 and 120 for adjusting an eccentric portion 130 of the friction member =112 toward or away from the floor. In order to secure the toe stop assembly in a desired adjusted position, a bolt 132 extends through the forwardmost aperture 98a in the opposite side frame means and also through arcuate slots 134 and 136 in the inserts 114 and 116. A nut 138 is assembled with the bolt `and is adapted to be tightened for clamping the toe stop assembly in the desired adjusted position. It will be observed that when the skate is tilted in the manner shown in FIG. 8 the toe stop friction member is engaged against the floor. The degree to which the skate structure must be tilted for accomplishing such an engagement may be changed hy adjusting the position of the toe stop friction member.

While -the preferred embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described herein, it is lobvious that many structural details may be changed without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. A skate structure comprising spaced apart longitudinally extending opposite side frame means respectively including overlapping relatively adjustable forward and rear longitudinally extending portions, said opposite side frame means having a first group of aligned apertures therein adjacent a forward end thereof, a second group of aligned apertures therein intermediate opposite ends thereof, and a third group of aligned apertures therein adjacent a rear end thereof, said apertures being spaced from each other longitudinally of said frame means, a

plurality of wheels disposed between said opposite side frame means and spaced longitudinally thereof, and axle means extending through aligned apertures in said opposite side frame means and through said wheels and supporting said. Wheels and securing said opposite side frame means together, certain of said axle means extending through apertures in overlapping parts of said forwardV and rear portions of the side frame means and providing the only means connecting the forward and rear portions together.

2. A skate structure, as defined in claim 1, wherein at least two of said axle means extend through spaced sets of aligned apertures in the overlapping parts of the forward and rear portions of the opposite side frame means.

3. A skate structure, as defined in claim 1, wherein the apertures of said second group of apertures are disposed with their axes substantially in a first generally horizontal plane and the apertures of said firstand third group of apertures are disposed with their axes in planes offset upwardly from said first mentioned plane.

4. A skate structure, as defined in claim 3, wherein said last mentioned planes are inclined upwardly and lrespectively rearwardly and forwardly from said first plane.

5. A skate structure, as defined in claim 3, wherein said last mentioned planes are inclined upwardly and respectively forwardly and rearwardly from said first mentioned plane.

6. A skate structure, as defined in claim 1, which includes a stop member of tough, resilient friction material mounted on forward ends of said opposite side frame means.

7. A skate structure, as defined in claim 6, which includes means adjustably securing said stop member on said side frame means for selectively positioning the stop member at different elevations.

8. A skate structure, as defined in claim 1, wherein each of said wheels comprises a hub portion and an annular disc of firm, tough and resilient material on said hub portion, said disc of each of said wheels having a peripheral edge portion of rounded cross section and a predetermined radial extent between said peripheral edge portion and its associated hub portion, said skate structure including means extending between said Wheels and said opposite side frame means and maintaining clearances between said opposite side frame means and said discs of the Wheels for preventing interference between the wheel discs and the side frame means in the event of deflection of the wheel discs under skating conditions, and each of said means maintaining said clearances having a width equal to about one-fourth of said radial extent of the wheel discs.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,527,840 2/1925 Chomin 280-11.22 1,728,063 9/1929 James 2801l.23 2,048,916 7/1936 Bentzlin 280-1122 2,664,317 12/1953 Glynn et al. SOI-5.3

BENJAMIN HERSH, Primary Examiner.

MILTON L. SMITH, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1527840 *May 8, 1924Feb 24, 1925Harry ChominSkate
US1728063 *Mar 7, 1928Sep 10, 1929James Floyd DCombined roller skate and scooter
US2048916 *May 25, 1935Jul 28, 1936Frank A BentzlinRoller skate
US2664317 *Apr 11, 1951Dec 29, 1953Raybestos Manhattan IncComposition roller skate wheel
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3622172 *Apr 9, 1970Nov 23, 1971Turf Ski IncTorsion land skier
US3900203 *Jul 8, 1974Aug 19, 1975Adolph F KukulowiczTandem wheeled roller skate
US4108450 *Apr 26, 1977Aug 22, 1978Bernard CoteRoller skate
US4323259 *Oct 3, 1980Apr 6, 1982Boudreau Robert JTwo wheel roller ice skate
US4492385 *Jul 21, 1982Jan 8, 1985Olson Scott BSkate having an adjustable blade or wheel assembly
US4603868 *Aug 18, 1983Aug 5, 1986Schuetz ErnstRoller skate undercarriage with adjustable rollers
US4909523 *Jun 12, 1987Mar 20, 1990Rollerblade, Inc.In-line roller skate with frame
US5048848 *Jun 12, 1987Sep 17, 1991Rollerblade, Inc.In-line roller skate with axle aperture plugs for simplified wheel installation
US5052701 *Aug 23, 1989Oct 1, 1991Rollerblade, Inc.Roller skate with pivoting brake
US5067736 *Aug 22, 1989Nov 26, 1991Rollerblade, Inc.Slotted brake for in-line roller skate
US5253883 *Jan 14, 1993Oct 19, 1993Rollerblade, Inc.Progressively actuated brake for a roller skate
US5280931 *Nov 20, 1992Jan 25, 1994Thistle Sports Enterprises, Inc.Roller brake
US5303940 *Sep 8, 1992Apr 19, 1994Jeannette L. BrandnerSkate having angularly mounted wheels
US5314199 *Mar 12, 1993May 24, 1994O.S. Designs, Inc.Convertible in-line roller skates
US5340132 *Feb 24, 1993Aug 23, 1994Rollerblade, Inc.Torsionally stiffened in-line roller skate frame with dual side walls
US5375859 *Aug 26, 1993Dec 27, 1994David G. PeckMechanical brake for in-line roller skate
US5401038 *Aug 5, 1994Mar 28, 1995David G. PeckMechanical brake for in-line roller skates
US5437466 *Jul 19, 1993Aug 1, 1995K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate
US5482301 *Oct 18, 1994Jan 9, 1996Babcock; MartinSelf leveling in-line skate brake
US5549309 *Jan 5, 1995Aug 27, 1996Gleichmann; Darin L.Multi-line in-line roller skate, multi-line in-line roller skate frame
US5549310 *Jan 10, 1994Aug 27, 1996K-2 CorporationIn-line roller skate with improved frame assembly
US5762346 *Jun 21, 1996Jun 9, 1998Roces S.R.L.In-line roller skate with adjustable wheels
US5816588 *Jun 4, 1997Oct 6, 1998Bauer Italia S.P.A.Carrier for an in-line roller skate
US5829757 *Oct 11, 1996Nov 3, 1998Mearthane Products CorporationVariable traction wheel for in-line roller skate
US6003882 *Nov 14, 1996Dec 21, 1999V-Formation, Inc.Customizable skate with removable wheel hangers
US6047973 *Feb 25, 1993Apr 11, 2000Amore; RobertIn-line skate brakes
US6227622Jun 20, 1997May 8, 2001K-2 CorporationMultilayer skate wheel
US6260861Nov 3, 1998Jul 17, 2001Mearthane Products CorporationVariable traction wheel for in-line roller skate
US6276696 *Jul 12, 1996Aug 21, 2001Jon Garfield WongIn-line roller skates
US6409184 *Aug 22, 2001Jun 25, 2002Ambrogio GianniniIn-line skate with spring centering wheels
US6554302 *Nov 19, 2001Apr 29, 2003Yueh-Fen LiuTricycle operated by torsion thereof
US20030146587 *Jan 27, 2003Aug 7, 2003Tsai-Ming LoIn-line skate
US20060214381 *Mar 10, 2004Sep 28, 2006Claudio ZampieriIn-line roller-skate, particularly for racing
US20130062840 *Sep 13, 2011Mar 14, 2013L. Patrick KellyIce skate
USRE35493 *May 3, 1995Apr 15, 1997Thistle Sports Enterprises, Inc.Roller brake
DE3918617A1 *Jun 7, 1989Dec 14, 1989Gakken Co LtdRollschuh
EP0414522A1 *Aug 22, 1990Feb 27, 1991Rollerblade, Inc.Roller skate
EP0811403A2 *Jun 2, 1997Dec 10, 1997Bauer Italia S.p.A.Chassis for an in-line roller skate
WO1995003861A1 *Aug 2, 1994Feb 9, 1995K-2 CorporationIn-like skate axle assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.209, 174/DIG.120, 280/11.231, 301/5.7
International ClassificationA63C17/22, A63C17/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/226, A63C17/06, Y10S174/12
European ClassificationA63C17/22D, A63C17/06