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Publication numberUS3288156 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1966
Filing dateNov 19, 1964
Priority dateNov 19, 1964
Publication numberUS 3288156 A, US 3288156A, US-A-3288156, US3288156 A, US3288156A
InventorsHans Jordan, Macias Julian F
Original AssigneeWaste King Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dishwasher with upwardly extensible distributor
US 3288156 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 29, 1966 H.JORDAN ETAL 3,288,156

DISHWASHER WITH UPWARDLY EXTENSIBLE DISTRIBUTOR Filed Nov. 19, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet l jA/l Elvroes. jnfmvs Japan/4N, CUA/FJA/ MAC/A5,

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DISHWASHER WITH UPWARDLY EXTENSIBLE DISTRIBUTOR Nov. 29, 1966 Filed Nov. 19, 1964 Hiwms, 15/504 13215554 4, ffl /w United States Patent 3,288,156 DISHWASHER WITH UPWARDLY EXTENSIBLE DISTRIBUTOR Hans Jordan, Los Angeies, and Julian F. Macias, La Mirada, Calif, assignors to Waste King Corporation, Los Angeles, Calif, a corporation of California Filed Nov. 19, 1964, Ser. No. 412,454 4 Claims. (Cl. 134-176) The present invention relates in general to dishwashers and, more particularly, to an improved system for distributing water over dishes carried by racks within the tub of a dishwasher.

As background, the invention contemplates a dishwasher having vertically spaced upper and lower dish racks within the tub thereof, and having a water distributing system, for spraying water against dishes carried by the upper and lower racks, which is supplied by a pump having its inlet in communication with the bottom of the tub. As is conventional, the water distributing system includes a reaction-type lower water distributor rotatable about a vertical axis between the lower dish rack and the bottom wall of the tub and adapted to spray water upwardly against dishes carried by the lower rack.

' A primary object of the invention is to provide a centrally-located upper water distributor which is extensible upwardly, by water under pressure delivered thereto by the pump, to spray such water upwardly against dishes carried by the upper rack, and which is contractible downwardly to a level below the lower rack when no water is delivered thereto, the lower rack having a central opening to receive the upper water distributor when it is in its extended condition.

An important object of the invention is to utilize an upper water distributor of the foregoing construction in a front loading dishwasher so that the lower dish rack may be moved into and out of the tub through a doorway in the front wall thereof without interference by the upper water distributor when it is in its contracted condition. Consequently, it is unnecessary to bifurcate the lower dish rack to accommodate the upper water distributor, which is an important feature of the invention.

Considering the invention more specifically now, an important object thereof is to mount the rotary lower water distributor and the vertically extensible and contractible, upper water distributor on a vertical tubular manifold centrally located in the tub below the lower dish rack and communicating at its lower end with the outlet of the pump, the manifold being provided intermediate its upper and lower ends with radial outlets which cornmunicate with the lower water distributor and being provided at its upper end with an axial outlet which communicates with the upper water distributor.

A further object of the invention is to provide a telescoping upper water distributor having sections which are telescoped downwardly into the manifold when the upper water distributor is in its contracted condition.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a water distributing means of the foregoing nature wherein the manifold mentioned is mounted on the upper end of the housing of a vertically-oriented axial flow pump carried by the bottom wall of the tub between such bottom wall and the lower dish rack. A related object is to provide the upper water distributor with telescoping sections which are seated on an outlet vane assembly of the axial flow pump when the upper water distributor is in its contracted condition.

An important object of the invention is to provide the upper water distributor with a reaction-type water distributing element rotatably mounted thereon at its upper end, such water distributing element acting to spray water upwardly against dishes carried by the upper dish rack.

Still more specific objects of the invention are to provide a front loading dishwasher which includes: a tub provided with a front wall having a doorway therein and provided with a bottom wall; vertically spaced upper and lower dish racks in the tub and mounted for movement into and out of the tub through the doorway; the lower dish rack being spaced upwardly from the bottom wall of the tub; a vertically oriented, axial flow pump centrally located in the tub below the lower dish rack and carried by the bottom wall of the tub; the pump including a pump housing which contains an axial flow impeller rotatable about a vertical axis and which is provided at its upper end with an axial outlet containing an outlet vane assembly; a vertical tubular manifold on the upper end of the pump housing and registering at its lower end with the axial outlet in the pump housing, the manifold having radial outlets intermediate its upper and lower ends and having an axial outlet at its upper end; a reaction-type lower water distributor rotatably mounted on the manifold intermediate its upper and lower ends and below the lower dish rack and communicating with the radial outlets in the manifold; a vertically extensible and contractible, telescoping, upper water distributor mounted on the manifold in communication with the axial outlet therein and extensible upwardly by water under pressure delivered thereto by the pump; the lower dish rack having a central opening to receive the upper water distributor when it is in its extended condition; the upper water distributor having sections which are telescoped downwardly into the manifold and seated on the outlet vane assembly when the upper water distributor is in its contracted condition; the upper end of the upper water distributor being below the lower dish rack when it is in its contracted condition and being above the bottom of the lower dish rack when it is in its extended condition;

and the upper water distributor having a reaction-type water distributing element rotatably mounted thereon at its upper end.

Another object of the invention is to provide a centrally-located water distributing system which includes means for directing a jet of water upwardly against another means, carried by the top wall of the tub, for deflecting the jet outwardly and downwardly against dishes carried by the upper rack.

The foregoing objects, advantages, features and results of the present invention, together with various other objects, advantages, features and results thereof which will be evident to those skilled in the dishwasher art in the light of this disclosure, may be achieved with the exemplary embodiments of the invention described in detail hereinafter and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a front loading dishwasher incorporating the water distributing means of the invention, parts of the front of the dishwasher being broken away to reveal the internal structure thereof;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary vertical sectional view of the water distributing means of the invention showing a vertically extensible and contractible, telescoping, upper water distributor thereof in its extended condition;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, but showing the upper water distributor in its contracted condition;

FIG. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the arrowed line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a reaction-type water distributing element rotatably mounted on the upper water distributor at its upper end;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view, partially in elevation and partially in section, taken as indicated by the arrow 6 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of an alternative upper water distributor of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken as indicated by the arrowed line 8-8 of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating still another embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 1 TO 6 Referring initially to FIG. 1 of the drawings, illustrated therein is a front loading dishwasher 10 which includes a tub 12 having a front wall 14 provided therein with a doorway 16 adapted to be closed by a forwardly and downwardly opening front door 18 mounted on aligned horizontal pivots 20. Within the tub 12 are vertically spaced upper and lower dish racks 22 and 24 respectively mounted on guide means 26 and 28 for movement into and out of the tub 12 through the doorway 16 in the conventional manner. The foregoing structure is typical of front loading dishwashers so that a more detailed description is unnecessary.

The dishwasher tub 12 includes a bottom wall 30 which is spaced downwardly from the lower rack 24 and which is provided therein with a central well 32 containing a vertically oriented, axial flow pump 34 centrally located with respect to the tub 12. The pump 34 forms part of a motor-pump assembly 36 suitably mounted on the bottom wall of the central well 32. The motor-pump assembly 36 includes a motor 38 coaxial with and directly connected to the pump 34.

Turning now to FIG- 2 of the drawings, the pump 34 includes a vertically oriented housing 40- provided at its lower end with radial inlets, not shown, in communication with the bottom of the well 32, as shown, for example, in Patent No. 3,058,497, granted October 16, 1962 to John A. Fay et al. Rotatable within the pump housing 40 about a vertical axis is an axial flow impeller 42 which is directly coupled to the armature, not shown, of the motor 38. At the upper end of the pump housing 40 is an upwardly facing, axial outlet 44. Carried by the pump housing 40 within the axial outlet 44 is an outlet vane assembly 46 comprising flow-straightening radial vanes 48 and a central hub 50.

A vertically oriented, tubular outlet manifold 52 is mounted on the upper end of the pump housing 40 with its lower end in register with the axial outlet 44, as by pressing a depending annular skirt 54 on the manifold over the upper end of the pump housing. The manifold 52 is provided intermediate its upper and lower ends with a cylindrical section 56 on which is journalled a hub 58 of a lower water distributor 60 rotatable in a horizontal plane between the lower rack 24 and the bottom wall 30 of the tub 12. Water discharged into the manifold 52 by the pump 34 enters the interior of the lower water distributor 60 through radial outlets 62 in the cylindrical section 56 of the manifold. As is conventional, the hub 58 of the lower Water distributor 60 carries diametrally opposed arms 64 provided with discharge openings 66 through which water is sprayed upwardly against dishes in the lower rack 24. At least some of the discharge openings 66 are so oriented as to impart rotational movement to the lower water distributor 60. The downward reaction force applied to the lower water distributor 60 by the upwardly directed jets of water emanating from the discharge openings 66 is resisted by a thrust bearing 68 carried by the lower water distributor and seated on an upwardly facing annular shoulder 70 on the manifold 52 at the junction of the cylindrical section 56 of the manifold with a reduced-diameter section 72 thereof.

The reduced diameter section 72 of the manifold 52 may be regarded as providing the manifold with an upwardly facing, axial outlet 74 at its upper end. Communicating with the axial outlet 74 is a vertically extensible and contractible, telescoping, upper water distributor 4 76 of the invention. As will be described, the upper water distributor 76 is extensible upwardly into a central opening 78 in the lower rack 24 by water under pressure delivered thereto by the pump 34, and is adapted to spray such water upwardly against dishes in the upper rack 22, as indicated in FIG. 1 of the drawings. When the dishwasher 10 is not in operation, the upper water distributor 76 contracts downwardly, under the influence of gravity, and is located completely beneath the lower rack 24, as shown in broken lines in FIG. 1 of the drawings. Under such conditions, the lower rack 24 may be moved into and out of the tub 12 through the doorway 16 without interference by the upper water distributor 76, and without any necessity for bifurcating the rear half of the lower rack to accommodate the upper water distributor, which are important features of the invention.

Considering the upper water distributor 76 in more detail, it is shown as including telescopically interconnected lower and upper sections 80 and 82 capable of being telescoped downwardly into the manifold 52 and to seat on the hub 50 of the outlet vane assembly 46, as shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings. More particularly, the lower telescoping section 80 of the upper water distributor 76 is guided by the reduced diameter section 72 of the manifold 52, and upward movement of the lower section 80 is limited by engagement of an external annular flange 84 at the lower end thereof wit-h a downwardly facing annular shoulder 86 on the manifold 52 at the junction of the sections 56 and 72 thereof. The upper telescoping section 82 of the upper water distributor 76 is guided by a reduced diameter section 88 at the upper end of the lower telescoping section 80. Upward movement of the upper telescoping section 82 is limited by engagement of an external annular flange 90 at the lower end thereof with a downwardly facing, internal annular shoulder 92 on the lower telescoping section 80 at the lower end of the reduced diameter section 88 thereof.

The upper telescoping section 82 is provided at its upper end with a spider 94 supporting a central vertical spindle 96 over which is telescoped a hub 98 of a cupshaped, reaction-type water distributing element 100 secured against removal by a screw 102. The water distributing element 100 has a depending annular skirt 104 which registers with and is of substantially the same diameter as the upper end of the upper telescoping section 82, there being a relatively close running fit between the periphery of the skirt 104 and the upper end of the upper telescoping section 82 to minimize leakage therebetween.

The water distributing element 100 is provided therein with at least two upwardly and outwardly directed, tangentially oriented water discharge openings 106. These openings spray the water delivered to the upper water distributor 76 outwardly and upwardly against dishes carried by the upper rack 22, and simultaneously impart rotational movement to the water distributing element 100 about a vertical axis. With this construction, complete blanketing of the upper reaches of the tub 12 by the water sprayed upwardly by the water distributing element 100 is assured. In this connection, it will be noted from FIG. 1 of the drawings that when the upper water distributor 76 is in its extended condition, the water distributing element 100 is located sufliciently close to the upper end of the central opening 78 in the lower rack 24 that the lower rack does not interfere with the upward and outward spray directed toward the upper rack 22.

Operation It is thought that the over-all operation of the invention will be clear from the foregoing description so that only a brief discussion is necessary at this point.

When the pump 34 is not in operation, the action of garvity causes the lower and upper telescoping sections 80 and 82 of the upper water distributor 76 to telescope downwardly into the manifold 52 and to seat on the hub 50 of the outlet vane assembly 46. To insure that the upper water distributor 76 will assume its contracted condition under the influence of gravity, ample clearances are provided, as clearly shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings.

When the upper water distributor 76 is in its contracted condition, the top of the water distributing element 100 is below the level of the bottom of the lower rack 24. Consequently, the lower rack 24 can be withdrawn from the tub 12 through the doorway 16 in the conventional manner without interference by the upper water distributor 76, and without any necessity for bifurcating the rear half of the lower rack, which are important features.

When the dishwasher is in operation, and the pump 34 is running, part of the water discharged by the pump 34 is sprayed upwardly against dishes in the lower rack 24 by the lower water distributor 60. The remainder of the water discharged by the pump enters the upper water distributor 76, and the pressure thereof extends the lower and upper telescoping section 80 and 82 upwardly into their uppermost positions, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings. Further, the water entering the extended water distributor 76 is ultimately discharged therefrom through the water distributing element 100, which sprays water upwardly and outwardly against dishes in the upper rack 22, and which rotates as it does so to blanket the entire upper regions of the tub 12 with the water sprayed therefrom.

The water pressure within the upper water distributor 76 urges the annular flanges 84 and 90 against the respective annular shoulders 86 and 92 sufficiently tightly to minimize leakage at these points. Preferably, the lower and upper telescoping sections 80 and 82 of the upper water distributor 76 are made of polyethylene, or a similar material. The advantages of such a material are that it will provided fluid tight seals between the annular flanges 84 and 0 and the respective annular shoulders 86 and 92, and will also insure downward contraction of the upper and lower telescoping sections, when the pump 34 is not in operation, because of the low coeflicient of friction of such material.

FIGS. 7 AND 8 FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate fragmentarily an alternative upper water distributor 110 having an upper telescoping section 112 surmounted by an alternative water distributing device 114. The latter is shown as comprising an inverted, cup-shaped, reaction-type water distributing element 116 generally similar to the water distributing element 100 and mounted on a spider 118 at the upper end of the upper telescoping section 112 in a manner similar to the water distributing element 100. The water distributing element 116 is provided with discharge openings 120 which spray water outwardly and upwardly against dishes in the upper rack 22, and which are so oriented that they simultaneously rotate the element 116. The principal difference between the water distributing element 116 and the water distributing element 100 is that the former has a larger diameter than the upper end of the upper telescoping section 112, so that water can escape from between the upper end of the telescoping upper section 112 and the periphery of a depending annular skirt 122 of the element 116. Such escaping water impinges on an upwardly facing, saucer-like annular deflector 124 mounted on the upper end of the upper telescoping section 112. This deflector directs the water impinging thereon upwardly toward the upper rack 22 in a generally cone-shaped spray to further blanket the upper regions of the tub L2.

The over-all operation of the structure of FIGS. 7 and 8 is similar to that of FIGS. 1 to 6 so that a more detailed description is not required.

It will be understood that still other water distributing devices can be substituted for the element 100. For example, a distributor similar to the distributor 60, but having a much smaller diameter, may be used.

6 FIG. 9

FIG. 9 illustrates fragmentarily another alternative upper water distributor having an upper telescoping section 132 surmounted by an inverted, cup-shaped, reaction-type water distributing element 134 substantially identical to the water distributing element 100. The water distributing element 134 is rotatably mounted on a spider 136 by means of a screw 138 similar to the screw 102.

An important feature of the water distributor 130 is that the screw 138 is provided therethrough with an axial passage 140 capable of producing an upwardly directed water jet 142, FIG. 1. The water jet 142 passes upwardly through a central opening 144 in the upper rack 22 and impinges on means 146, mounted on the top wall 148 of the tub 12, for deflecting the jet outwardly and downwardly against dishes carried by the upper rack. The means 146 may take various forms, being illustrated as a propeller-like or fan-like member mounted for rotation about a vertical axis and including blades 150.

With the foregoing construction, water is sprayed against dishes carried by the upper rack 22 from above, as well as from below, thereby obtaining improved washing and rinsing of such dishes.

Although exemplary. embodiments of the invention have been disclosed herein for purposes of illustration, it will be understood that various changes, modifications and substitutions may be incorporated in such embodiments without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the claims which follow.

We claim:

1. In a front loading dishwasher, the combination of:

(a) a tub provided with a front wall having a doorway therein and provided with a bottom wall;

(b) vertically spaced upper and lower dish racks in said tub and mounted for movement into and out of said tub through said doorway;

(c) said lower dish rack being spaced upwardly from said bottom wall of said tub;

(d) a vertical tubular manifold centrally located in said tub below said lower dish rack and carried by said bottom wall of said tub;

(e) a pump having an outlet communicating with the lower end of said manifold to deliver water thereto;

(f) said manifold having radial outlets intermediate its upper and lower ends and having an axial outlet at its upper end;

(g) a reaction-type lower water distributor rotatably mounted on said manifold intermediate its upper and lower ends and below said lower dish rack and communicating with said radial outlets in said manifold;

(h) a vertically extensible and contractible, telescoping, upper water distributor mounted on said manifold in communication with said axial outlet therein and extensible upwardly by water under pressure delivered thereto by said pum (i) said lower dis-h rack having a central opening to receive said upper water distributor when it is in its extended condition;

(j) said upper water distributor having sections which telescope downwardly into said manifold when said upper water distributor is in its contracted condition; and

(k) the upper end of said upper water distributor being below said lower dish rack when it is in its contracted condition and being above the bottom of said lower dish rack when it is in its extended condition.

2. In a front loading dishwasher, the combination of:

(a) a tubprovided with a front wall having a doorway therein and provided with a bottom wall;

(b) vertically spaced upper and lower dish racks in said tub and mounted for movement into and out of said tub through said doorway;

(c) said lower dish rack being spaced upwardly from said bottom wall of said tub;

(d) a vertical tubular manifold centrally located in said tub below said lower dish rack and carried by said bottom wall of said tub;

(e) a pump having an outlet communicating with the lower end of said manifold to deliver water thereto;

(f) said manifold having radial outlets intermediate its upper and lower ends and having an axial outlet at its upper end;

(g) a reaction-type lower water distributor rotatably mounted on said manifold intermediate its upper and lower ends and below said lower dish rack and communicating with said radial outlets in said manifold;

(h) a vertically extensible and contractible, telescoping, upper water distributor mounted on said manifold in communication with said axial outlet therein and extensible upwardly by water under pressure delivered thereto by said pump;

(i) said lower dis-h rack having a central opening to receive said upper water distributor when it is in its extended condition;

(j) said upper water distributor having sections which telescope downwardly into said manifold when said upper water distributor is in its contracted condi tion;

(k) the upper end of said upper water distributor being below said lower dish rack when it is in its contracted condition and being above the bottom of said lower dish rack when it is in its extended condition; and

(1) said upper water distributor having a reaction-type water distributing element rotatably mounted thereon at its upper end.

3. In a front loading dishwasher, the combination of (a) a tub provided with a front wall having a doorway therein and provided with a bottom wall;

(b) vertically spaced upper and lower dish racks in said tub and mounted for movement into and out of said tub through said doorway;

(c) said lower dish rack being spaced upwardly from said bottom wall of said tub;

(d) a vertically oriented, axial flow pump centrally located in said tub below said lower dis-h rack and carried by said bottom wall of said tub;

(c) said pump including a pump housing which contains an axial flow impeller rotatable about a vertical axis and which is provided at its upper end with an axial outlet;

(f) a vertical tubular manifold on the upper end of said pump housing and registering at :its lower end with said axial outlet in said pump housing, said manifold having radial outlets intermediate its upper and lower ends and having an axial outlet at its upper end;

(g) a reaction-type lower water distributor rotatably mounted on said manifold intermediate its upper and lower ends and below said lower dish rack and communicating with said radial outlets in said manifold;

(h) a vertically extensible and contractible, telesco ing, upper water distributor mounted on said manifold in communication with said axial outlet therein and extensible upwardly by water under pressure delivered thereto by said pump;

(i) said lower dish rack having a central opening to receive said upper water distributor when it is in its extended condition;

(j) said upper water distributor having sections which telescope downwardly into said manifold when said upper water distributor is in its contracted condition; v

(k) the upper end of said upper water distributor being below said lower dish rack when it is in its contracted condition and being above the bottom of said lower dish rack when it is in its extended condition; and

(1) said upper water distributor having a reaction-type water distributing element rotatably mounted thereon at its upper end.

4.'In a front loading dishwasher, the combination of:

(a) a tub provided with a front wall having a doorway therein and provided with 'a bottom wall;

(b) vertically spaced upper and lower dish racks in said tub and mounted for movement into and out of said tu-b through said doorway;

(c) said lower dish rack being spaced upwardly from said bottom wall of said tub;

(d) a vertically oriented, axial flow pump centrally located in said tu-b below said lower dish rack and carried by said bottom wall of said tub;

(c) said pump including a pump housing which contains an axial flow impeller rotatable about a vertical axis and which is provided at its upper end with an axial outlet containing an outlet vane assembly;

(f) a vertical tubular manifold on the upper end of said pump housing and registering at its lower end with said axial outlet in said pump housing, said manifold having radial outlets intermediate its upper and lower ends and having an axial outlet at its upper end;

(g) a reaction-type lower water distributor rotatably mounted on said manifold intermediate its upper and lower ends and below said lower dish rack and communicating with said radial outlets in said manifold;

(h) a vertically extensible and contractible, telescoping, upper water distributor mounted on said manifold in communication with said axial outlet therein and extensible upwardly by water under pressure delivered thereto by said pump;

(i) said lower dish rack having a central opening to receive said upper water distributor when it is in its extended condition; I I

(j) said upper water distributor having sections which are telescoped downwardly into said manifold and seated on said outlet vane assembly when said upper water distributor is in its contracted condition;

(k) the upper end of said upper water distributor being below said lower dish rack when it is in its contracted condition and being above the bottom of said lower dish rack when it is in its extended condition; and

(1) said upper water distributor having a reaction-type water distributing element rotatably mounted thereon at its upper end.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,664,903 1/1954 Sway 134-176 3,051,184 8/1962 Gibson 134-183 3,067,759 12/1962 Guth et al. 134-176 3,077,200 2/1963 Guth 134-176 3,144,034 8/1964 Lyman et al. 134-183 X CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

- R. L. BLEUTGE Assistant Examiner,

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3375835 *Sep 23, 1965Apr 2, 1968Whirlpool CoArticle washing apparatus
US3468486 *Feb 2, 1967Sep 23, 1969Gen Motors CorpDishwasher with multiple spray arm
US3841342 *Jan 2, 1973Oct 15, 1974Gen ElectricDishwasher and spray system therefor
US3866837 *Oct 15, 1973Feb 18, 1975Gen ElectricSpray arm bearing
US4174723 *Oct 16, 1978Nov 20, 1979White-Westinghouse CorporationDishwasher water distribution apparatus
US4732323 *Aug 27, 1986Mar 22, 1988Whirlpool CorporationLower spray arm system for dishwasher
US4991611 *Jun 8, 1989Feb 12, 1991Whirlpool CorporationLower spray arm for dishwasher
US5241975 *Feb 25, 1992Sep 7, 1993Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaDishwasher
US5546968 *Oct 19, 1994Aug 20, 1996Goldstar Co., Ltd.Supplementary washing device of a dish washer
US5697392 *Mar 29, 1996Dec 16, 1997Maytag CorporationApparatus for spraying washing fluid
US5727581 *Oct 2, 1996Mar 17, 1998General Electric CompanyDishwasher spray-arm assembly
US5954073 *Dec 22, 1997Sep 21, 1999General Electric CompanyWash apparatus for a dishwasher
US7426933 *Sep 25, 2003Sep 23, 2008Maytag CorporationDishwasher with kinetic energy water distribution system
US7695571Aug 9, 2006Apr 13, 2010Maytag CorporationWash/rinse system for a drawer-type dishwasher
DE4020898A1 *Jun 30, 1990Jan 2, 1992Licentia GmbhDishwasher spray arm - has movement sensor to indicate blockage through incorrect loading
WO1993012706A1 *Dec 18, 1992Jul 8, 1993Fisher & PaykelDishwasher
WO2008029222A2 *Aug 23, 2007Mar 13, 2008Indesit Co SpaHousehold washing machine, in particular a dishwasher, comprising an improved upper hydraulic circuit
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/176, 134/183
International ClassificationA47L15/18, A47L15/14, A47L15/23
Cooperative ClassificationA47L15/23, A47L15/18
European ClassificationA47L15/23, A47L15/18