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Publication numberUS3289766 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1966
Filing dateAug 15, 1963
Priority dateAug 15, 1963
Publication numberUS 3289766 A, US 3289766A, US-A-3289766, US3289766 A, US3289766A
InventorsBigelow Herbert L
Original AssigneeBaker Oil Tools Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Retrievable high temperature well packer apparatus
US 3289766 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 6, 1966 H. 1.. BIGELOW 3,289,766

RETRIEVABLE HIGH TEMPERATURE WELL PACKER APPARATUS Filed Aug. 15, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 H. L. BIGELOW Dec. 6, 1966 RETRIEVABLE HIGH TEMPERATURE WELL PACKER APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 15, 1963 ZNVENTOR. Qeggr 13 m IGELOW xQrfOAP/VEYS.

H. L. BIGELQW Dec. 6, 1966 RETRIEVABLE HIGH TEMPERATURE WELL PACKER APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 15, 1965 g 9 F V INVENTOR.

HERBERT Zn B/6EL0W @0 Mw/(M WA/ 19 r TOQNE Y5 H. L. BIGELOW Dec. 6, 1966 RETRIEVABLE HIGH TEMPERATURE WELL PACKER APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 15, 1963 I NV ENTOR. Hit-@5527" 6 B/GELOW BY ymzggw M ,EQWMWM/ flrromvs Ya.

Dec. 6, 1966 H. BIGELOW 3,289,766

RETRIEVABLE HIGH TEMPERATURE WELL PACKER APPARATUS Filed Aug. 15, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 L" 73 INVENTOR- 49 1 b x 70 [1225597 1; B/6EL0W I BY 48 50 68 7a 1 50 Zwu /;"ZMW/ 447T TOQNE Y5.

United States Patent ()fiice 3,289,766 Patented Dec. 6, 1966 3,289,766 RETRIEVABLE HIGH TEMPERATURE WELL PACKER APPARATUS Herbert L. Bigelow, Whittier, Califi, assignor to Baker Oil Tools, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Aug. 15, 1963, Ser. No. 302,391 29 Claims. (Cl. 166139) The present invention relates to subsurface well bore apparatus, and more particularly to packer apparatus adapted to be set in well bores.

An object of the invention is to provide well packer apparatus to be associated with a tubular string extending to the top of the well bore and to be set in packed-off condition in the well bore against movement in both longitudinal directions therewithin, the packer remaining in its set condition and leakage of fluid between the packer and the tubular string being prevented despite the subjecting of the apparatus and tubular string to widely diifering temperature, which, for example, may range from about 80 F. to about 700 F., such temperature changes producing extensive expansion and contraction of the tubular string and of parts of the well packer itself.

Another object of the invention is to provide retrivable well packer apparatus capable of withstanding high temperatures and wide temperature variations when set in a well bore, in which both positive anchoring of the packer apparatus in the well bore and its leakproof sealing against the wall of the well bore are easily accomplished merely by applying torque to the several packer parts, which is transmitted through a tubular string to which the packer apparatus is secured. In a more limited sense, torque is first applied to anchor the packer apparatus in the well bore, after which torque is applied to effect a pack-off against the wall of the well bore.

A further object of the invention is to provide a retr-ievable well packer apparatus adapted to be anchored in packed-off condition in the well bore against movement in both longitudinal directions, in which release and retrieval of the well packer is secured in a simple and expedient manner merely by the taking of an upward pull on the tubular string with which the apparatus is operatively associated.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a packer apparatus to be set in a well bore and associated with the tubular string in the well bore, the packer apparatus having a mandrel slidable longitudinally therethrough to permit free contraction and expansion of the tubular string as a result of its being subjected to wide temperature variations, a seal being provided between the mandrel and packer which is self-energizing, to prevent fluid leakage between the mandrel and its associated packer parts.

The invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of a form in which it may be embodied. This form is shown in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. It will now be described in detail, for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURES 1a and lb together constitute a combined longitudinal section and side elevational view through a retrievable well packer apparatus, with the parts in their initial position for lowering the packer through a well casing, or similar conduit string, in the well bore, FIG. lb being a lower continuation of FIG. 1a;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-section taken along the line 22 on FIG. la;

FIGS. 3a and 3b are enlarged vertical sections through the well packer anchored against movement in both longitudinal directions in the well casing, FIG. 3b being a lower continuation of FIG. 3a;

FIGS. 4a and 4b constitute a longitudinal section through the well packer apparatus anchored in packedoff condition in the well casing, FIG. 41) being a lower continuation of FIG. 4a;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary section through a portion of the packing expander mechanism showing movement of the parts to a packing releasing position;

FIGS. 6a and 6b together constitute a longitudinal section through the packer apparatus, after it has been released from the well casing, FIG. 6b being a lower continuation of FIG. 6a;

FIG. 7 is a cross-section taken along the line 7--7 on FIG. 422;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged cross-section taken along the line 8-8 on FIG. in;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged cross-section taken along the line 99 on FIG. 3a; and

FIG. 10 is an enlarged cross-section taken along the line 10-1tl on FIG. 3b.

The well packer apparatus A illustrated in the drawings is of the retrievable type and is adapted to be lowered in a well casing B on a suitable tubular string C extending to the top of the well bore to a setting point at which the packer is adapted to be anchored in packedoff condition. It is positively anchored against movement in both longitudinal directions in the well casing and is capable of permitting the tubing string C to expand and contract to a substantial extent without effecting the setting of the packer, while maintaining a leakproof relation between the tubing string and the well packer. After the well packer A has accomplished its desired purpose in the well bore, it is readily released from the well casing B and elevated therewithin to the top of the well bore.

As disclosed in the drawings, the well packer apparatus A includes an elongate tubular mandrel 10, the upper end of which is threadedly secured to a clutch or coupling collar 11, which is, in turn, threadedly secured to the lower end of the tubular string C that extends to the top of the well bore. The inner tubular member or mandrel 10 is movable to a substantial longitudinal extent within an encompassing packer body 12 and is also rotatable within such body. The upper portion of the mandrel extends through a mandrel seal device 13,. including a seal housing 14 spaced laterally from the periphery of the mandrel to provide an annular space for a seal ring assembly, consisting of packing rings 15 made of suitable material, such as Teflon, separated by metallic spacer rings 16. The lowermost spacer ring 16 rests upon an upwardly facing housing shoulder 19, the upper spacer ring 16 engaging an annular pusher plate 20 disposed within a spring and clutch housing member 21 threadedly secured to the upper portion of the seal housing 14. A strong helical compression spring 22 is disposed within a counterbore 23 in the housing, the upper end of the spring bearing against the base 24 of the housing counterbore and its other end bearing against the pusher plate 20, so as to tend to shorten the seal ring assembly and effect its lateral movement into sealing engagement with the periphery of the mandrel and also into sealing engagement with the wall of the seal housing 14. The spring 22 is constantly exerting a force on the seal assembly to maintain it appropriately sealed against the periphery of the mandrel, and thereby prevent leakage along the exterior of the mandrel, despite rotary movement of the mandrel 10, or its substantial longitudinal movement within the seal assembly.

The upper portion of the clutch housing 21 has circumferentially spaced recesses 25 providing intervening axial teeth 26 adapted to mesh with companion depending teeth 27 of the clutch collar 11, to transmit rotary motion of the tubular string C through the driving clutch member 11 to the driven clutch member 21. Upward movement of the driving clutch collar 11 out of clutching engagement with the driven clutch member 21 is initially prevented by one or a plurality of shear screws 28 (FIGS. 3a, 9) extending through the clutch collar 11 into the driving clutch collar 21. Torque can be transmitted between the driving and driven clutch collars 11, 21 without such torque being imposed on the shear screw or screws 28, As described hereinbelow, after the packer A has been anchored to the well casing, the taking of a sufficient upward pull on the tubular string C and driving clutch collar 11 will shear the screws and allow substantial upward movement of the mandrel 10 within the surrounding packer structure.

The lower portion of the seal housing 14 is threadedly secured to the upper section 30 of the tubular packer body 12, within which the mandrel is slidable. This upper section 30 carries the anchoring portion 31 of the packer. The lower end of the upper section is threadedly attached to a lower section 32 of the body about which the packing assembly 33 of the well packer is disposed.

As shown, the upper body section 30 has left-hand threads 34 on its periphery meshing with companion internal left-hand threads 35 on an upper expander 36 having a downward and inwardly tapering expander surface 37. Initially, the upper expander 36 occupies an upper position along the body section 30, its upward threaded position being limited by engagement of an axial pin 38 secured to its upper end engaging a companion pin 39 extending downwardly from a stop nut 40 threaded on the upper body section and locked thereto by a suitable set screw 41. This upper body nut 40 has an outwardly directed flange 42 received within an internal groove 43 defined by a lower inwardly directed flange 44 of an elongate slip housing 45 and a cap 46 threaded into the upper end of the housing.

The elongate housing 45 has a plurality of circumferentially spaced elongate slots or windows 47, in each of which a slip device 48 is received, this slip device having an upper anchor portion 49 with downwardly facing teeth 50 and a lower anchor portion 51 with upwardly facing teeth 52. The upper anchor portion 49 of each slip device has an inner tapered expander surface 53 conforming to the expander surface 37 of the upper expander 36 and adapted to be engaged thereby to shift the upper anchor portion 49 outwardly and embed its teeth 50 in the wall of the well casing B. The lower anchor portion 51 has an inner expander surface 54 tapering in an upward and inward direction adapted to be engaged by a companion tapered surface 55 on a lower expander 56 slidable relatively along the upper body section 36 and adapted to shift the lower anchor portion 51 outwardly to embed its teeth 52 in the wall of the well casing. The body nut flange 42 and the internal groove 43 in the slip housing 45 provide a swivel structure, which permits the body nut 40 to turn with the packer body 12 within the slip housing 45 while preventing longitudinal movement of the latter with respect to the body 12 of the tool.

Initially, the lower expander 56 is supported by the lower portion of the slip housing 45 by means of one or more shear screws 58 connecting a lower expander skirt 59 with the upper portion of an expander thrust sleeve or abutment 60 depending therefrom and by one or more shear screws 61 threaded into the lower portion of the slip housing 45 and received within a peripheral groove 62 in the thrust sleeve. Initially, the upper end 63 of the thrust sleeve is spaced from the main body of the lower expander 56 to permit sufficient upward movement of the thrust sleeve 60 to disrupt both sets of shear screws 58, 61 and bring the upper end 63 of the thrust sleeve into engagement with the lower expander 56, so that the upward thrust of the sleeve 60 is transmitted to the lower expander and from the latter through the lower anchor portions 51 of the slips 48 to the well casing B.

Initially, the slips 48 are disposed in an upper position within the elongate housing slots 47, there being a substantial space 64 between the lower ends of the slips and the lower end of the housing defining the housing slots. The slips are retained initially in a retracted position and are urged to such retracted position following release of the tool A from the casing by a plurality of tension springs 65 interconnecting opposed side wings 66 extending toward each other circumferentially of the apparatus from opposite sides of each of the slips 48 (FIG. 8). The tension springs 65 tend to retain the slips in retracted position, but they will, nevertheless, permit the upper and lower expanders 36, 56 to shift the slips outwardly into anchoring engagement with the wall of the well casing. When the upper and lower expanders have been removed from their expanded relation behind the slips, the tension springs 65 can pull the slips inwardly, or retract them, from the casing wall B, as described hereinbelow.

Outward expansion of the slips 48 occurs as a result of feeding the upper expander 36 downwardly toward the lower expander 56, as a result of rotating the body 12 of the packer tool. Such downward feeding will occur since the upper expander 36 is prevented from rotating with the body of the tool. As shown mostclearly in FIG. 10, the exterior of the expander 36 has circumferentially spaced longitudinal keyways or grooves 67 in which keys 68 are received that project inwardly from the slip housing 45 and which are suitably secured thereto, as by means of screw 69. The key and the keyway interconnection 68, 67 between the upper expander 36 and the housing 45 permits longitudinal movement, such as downward movement, of the expander along the slip housing, but prevents significant rotation of the upper expander relative to the housing. Rotation of the housing itself within the casing B is prevented or resisted by a plurality of circumferentially spaced outwardly bowed friction drag springs 70 friotionally bearing against the wall of the easing. The upper ends of the friction drag springs are secured to the slip housing 45 by one or more screws 71; whereas, their lower ends 72 are free to move longitudinally within guide grooves 73 formed in the exterior of the slip housing. Thus, rotation of the body 12 of the tool will cause the body nut 40 to rotate with it, its rotational stop pin 39 moving in a clockwise direction, looking down from the top of the well bore, away from the rotational stop pin 38 on the upper expander. The upper expander 36 feeds downwardly along the body 12 of the tool, because of the left-hand threaded interconnection 34, 35, into engagement with the upper anchor portion 49 of the slips 48, shifting them downwardly along the lower expander 56 and moving both upper and lower anchor portions 59, 51 as a unit outwardly into anchoring engagement with the wall of the well casing B (FIGS. 3a, 3b). The transmission of suflicient torque through the body 12 can move the upper expander 36 downwardly toward the lower expander 56 to firmly embed the teeth 50, 52 of the upper and lower anchor portions of the slips in the wall of the well casing. Such rotary motion and torque is transmitted to the body from the tubular string C, passing through the driving and driven clutch members 11, 21, and through the seal assembly housing 14 to the tubular body 12 itself.

After the tool A has been anchored to the well casing B against longitudinal movement in both directions, the packing assembly 33 can be expanded against the wall of the well casing and also firmly against the periphery of the lower body section 32. As disclosed in the drawings, the packing assembly includes a packing element, annular member or sleeve 75 made of suitable material. Since it is desired to provide a well packer capable of maintaining a sealed relation against the well casing under comparatively high temperature conditions, the packing element 75 may be made of impregnated asbestos compounds of the type commercially used as steam packing, and capa'ble of functioning properly at temperatures up to about 750 F. The external diameter of this packing element 75 is initially substantially less than the inside diameter of the casing B in which it is to be set, the packing element being initially in a retracted position on the packer body section 32. An upper thrust plate 76 is mounted on the body at the upper end of the packing element and a lower thrust plate 77 is mounted on the body at the lower end of the packing element. The upper thrust plate engage an upper malleable extrusion preventing frusto-conical ring 7-8, which, for example, may be made of mild steel or aluminum, the large end of the ring engaging the thrust plate 7 6 and its small end being disposed around a depending inner projection 79 of and against a gauge ring 80 abutting and surrounding the lower end of the expander thrust sleeve 60. This gauge ring 80 is suitably secured to the expander thrust sleeve 60 by screws 81.

The lower thrust plate 77 engages the large end of a lower malleable back-up or extrusion preventing frustoconical ring 82, the small end of which surrounds an inner projection 83 on a compression sleeve or abutment 84 and bearing against a transverse surface 85 of the latter. The lower 'end of the compression sleeve bears against an antifriction thrust washer 86 urrounding the body section 32, which may be made of some low friction material, such as Teflon, the thrust washer, in turn, engaging an upper flange 87 threaded onto the upper end of a thrust sleeve 88. The lower portion of this thrust sleeve is provided with circumferentially spaced longitudinal slots 89 opening through its lower end to provide spring-like legs 90 terminating in feet 91, the inner portion 92 of which are initially received within a peripheral groove 93 in a setting sleeve 94 surrounding the mandrel 10, the upper end 95 of the setting sleeve being internally threaded for meshing engagement with a companion external thread 96 at the lower portion of the lower body section 32. The threaded connection 95, 96 between the body 12 and setting sleeve 94 is preferably lefthand, the setting sleeve being at first threaded onto the lower portion of the threaded body section 90 (FIG. 1b).

The inner portions 92 of the thrust sleeve feet are maintained in the peripheral groove 93 by a restricted diameter upper portion 97 of a retainer housing 98, the inner wall of which engages the outwardly projecting portions 99 of the latch feet 91. Below its restricted diameter portion 97, the retainer housing is enlarged in internal diameter to provide an elongate circumferential recess 100 into which the latch feet 91 can spring, as described hereinbelow, When the thrust sleeve 88 is to be disconnected from the setting sleeve 94. The retainer housing 98 is initially retained in its position holding the inner latch feet portions 92 within the peripheral groove 93 of the setting sleeve by one or a plurality of shear pins 101 extending through the lower portion 102 of the retainer sleeve, which is slidable upon the periphery of the setting sleeve 94, the pins 101 being disposed within a peripheral groove 103 in the setting sleeve and being prevented from moving outwardly of such groove by retainer screws 104 threaded in the outer portion of the retainer sleeve and abutting the shear pins. The shear pins 101 releasably prevent relative longitudinal movement between the setting sleeve 94 and the retainer housing 98 until sufiicient upward force is imposed on the retainer housing to shear the pins, whereupon the housing 98 moves upwardly to elevate its restricted diameter upper retaining portion 97 from the latch feet 91, the enlarged housing recess then being disposed opposite such latch feet, and permitting the foot portions 92 to shift out of the peripheral groove 93, which may have a tapered lower side 105 to facilitate such outward shifting or camming of the latch feet.

Rotary motion is transmittable from the retainer housing 98 to the setting sleeve 94 to thread the setting sleeve upwardly along the lower housing section 32, such rotary motion being transferred through a longitudinal keyway formed in the lower portion 102 of the retainer housing to a key 111 received therewithin, the key also being received within a longitudinal keyway 112 in the exterior of the setting sleeve 94. Thus, rotary motion or torque can be transmitted from the retainer housing 98 through the key 111 to the setting sleeve 94, but such torque i not imposed upon the shear pins 101, which can only be disrupted upon the imposition of sufiicient upward force on the retainer housing 98.

The rotary motion just referred to results from elevating the tubing string C and shifting the upper driving clutch member 11 upwardly out of clutching engagement with the upper driven clutch member 21, and then bringing a lower driving clutch member and guide 113, threadedly secured to the lower end of the mandrel 10, upwardly into engagement with a lower driven clutch portion 114 of the retainer housing 98. Thus, the driving clutch 113 has circumferentially spaced upwardly facing axial driving dogs or teeth 115 adapted to mesh with companion driving dogs or teeth 116 formed in the lower portion of the retainer housing. When the mandrel 10 is moved up sufliciently to couple the driving clutch member 113 to the driven clutch portion 114 of the retainer housing, right-hand rotation of the tubing string C, upper collar 11 and mandrel 10 will rotate the latch retainer housing 98 and setting sleeve 94 to feed the setting sleeve upwardly along the body 12, such upward motion being transmitted through the thrust sleeve 88 to the thrust flange or plate 87, which will slide circumferentially around the anti-friction thrust Washer 86, but which will shift the lower compression sleeve 84 upwardly toward the expander thrust sleeve 60 to shorten the distance between the gauge ring 80 and the compression sleeve 84 to correspondingly shift the thrust plates 76, 77 relatively toward each other and expand the packing element 75 outwardly into sealing engagement with the Wall of the well casing B. Continued rotation will feed the retainer housing 98, setting sleeve 94 and thrust sleeve 88 upwardly to a greater extent, flattening the upper and lower extrusion preventing rings 78, 82 until their outer peripheries engage the wall of the well casing, bridging the annular spaces between the upper and lower thrust plates 76, 77 and the wall of the Well casing B to prevent extrusion of the packing material 75 through such spaces: and beyond the extrusion preventing or back-up rings themselves (FIG. 4b).

The mandrel 10 may have a substantial length of stroke Within the members surrounding it to be assured that either the upper clutch device 11, 21 is engaged or the lower clutch device 113, 114, but not both devices at the same time. The mandrel 10 may have a sufficient maximum length of stroke as to more than compensate for the linear expansion and contraction of which the tubing string C will partake. Thus, the mandrel 10 may be allowed to partake of a substantial number of feet of travel between engagement of the upper clutch device and engagement of the lower clutch device. After the well packer A is anchored in packed-off condition in the well casing B, the mandrel 10 may be placed in a somewhat neutral position to permit sufficient expansion and contraction of the tubing string C without engaging either the upper or the lower clutch device.

In the use of the apparatus, the parts are first disposed .in their relative positions illustrated in FIGS. la and 1b, in which the upper clutch 11, 21 is engaged and the lower driving clutch member 113 is disposed a substantial distance below the lower driven clutch member 114. The upper driving clutch collar 11 is releasably secured to the driven clutch collar 21 by the shear screws 28. The apparatus is lowered in the well casing to the desired setting point, after which the tubing string C is turned to the right, which will effect a rotation of the body 12 of the tool to the right. Since the frictional engagement of the drag springs 70 with the wall of the well casing prevents the slip housing 45 from turning, and in view of the slidable keying or splining of the upper expander 36 to the slip housing, the upper expander also is prevented from turning. Accordingly, rotation of the tubular string C and body 12 of the tool results in a downward threading of the upper expander 36 on the tool body 12 and its shifting toward the lower expander 56. As the upper expander advances toward the lower expander, its expander surface 37 engages the upper expander surfaces 53 of the slips 48, the lower expander surfaces 54 of the slips engaging the lower expander 56, re ulting in the slips being moved outwardly into engagement with the wall of the well casing B. Upon engagement of the slip teeth 50, 52 with the wall of the well casing, the torque required to shift the upper expander 36 downwardly of the body toward the lower expander 56 will increase, and

when such torque reaches a desired value, which, for example, may be about 300 foot-pounds, the teeth 50, 52 are firmly anchored against the wall of the well casing (FIGS. 3a, 3b). Such anchoring capability might be checked by setting down on the tubing string C, this setting down force being transmitted through the driving clutch collar 11 to the driven clutch collar 21, and through the seal housing 14 to the body 12 of the tool and the upper expander 36. An upward strain can also be taken on the tubing string, which will be transmitted through the body 12 and its lock nut 40 to the slip housing 45, and through the shear screws 61, thrust sleeve 60 and screws 58 to the upper expander 56 and then to the lower anchor portions 51 of the slips. The upward and downward force, which, for example, may :be about 4000 pounds of upstrain and 4000 pounds of setting downweight, is normally taken while the proper torque is maintained on the tubing. This will insure elimination of all play between the expanders 36, 56 and the slips 48 and the firm, solid anchoring of the slips against the wall of the well casing. The tool A has now been anchored against longitudinal movement in both directions within the well casing.

After the tool has been anchored to the well casing (FIGS. 3a, 3b), it is desired to expand the initially retracted packing assembly 33 against the wall of the well casing. A sufiicient upward strain is taken on the tubing string C, which will be transmitted to the upper clutch collar 11, overcoming the shear strength of the upper screws 28 and disrupting them, thereby allowing the tubing string C to elevate and disengage the clutch collar 11 from the driven clutch member 21 and the mandrel 10 within the body 12 of the well packer and bring the lower driving clutch and guide member 113 into clutching engagement with the lower driven clutch member 114. While maintaining sufiicient upstrain on the tubular string C and mandrel 10 to insure the retention of the lower driving clutch member 113 in clutching engagement with the driven clutch member 114 of the retainer housing 98, the tubular string and mandrel are rotated to the right.

Such rotation is transmitted from the retainer housing 98 through the key 111 to the setting sleeve housing 94, threading the latter upwardly along the body 12, in view of their left-hand threaded interconnection 95, 96, such upward movement carrying the thrust sleeve 88 upwardly with it and shifting the thrust plate 87 and compression sleeve 84 upwardly toward the expander thrust sleeve 60. The movement of the compression thrust sleeve 84 toward the expander thrust sleeve 60' and its gauge ring shortens the packing assembly 33 and expands the packing element 75 outwardly against the wall of the well casing C, as Well as deforming the back-up rings 78, 82 outwardly against the wall of the well casing. As the upward strain exceeds the shear value of the screws 58, 61 securing the expander thrust sleeve 60 to the lower expander 56 and the slip housing 45, the latter are disrupted, the expander thrust sleeve 60 moving upwardly into abutment with the lower expander 56. When this occurs, the torque will noticeably decrease, but such torque is again increased by turning of the tubing string C, mandrel 10, lower clutch mechanism 113, 114, setting sleeve 94 and thrust sleeve 88 to urge the compression sleeve 84 upwardly once again to compress the packing assembly 33 into firm sealing engagement with the wall of the well casing, and also against the periphery of the lower body section. When the torque has reached a certain value, which, by way of example, may be about 1500 footpounds, assurance is had that the tool is fully packed off, which can be checked by imposing pressure on the fluid in the annulus of the casing surrounding the tubing string C. If leakage is indicated, the torque can be increased by rotating the tubing string C and mandrel 10 to obtain further upward movement of the sleeves 94, 88, 84 toward the expander 56 to further compress the packing assembly 33 against the Well casing. The packer is now anchored in packed-01f condition in the Well casing, whereupon the tubing C can be lowered to disengage the lower driving clutch or guide 113 from the retainer housing 98, allowing the mandrel 10 to swivel and move freely within the packer body 12.

A suitable fluid, such as high temperature steam, can now be pumped down the tubing string C and through the mandrel 10 of the tool. In view of the elevated temperature of the steam, which may, for example, be about 560 F., the tubing C will expand. Such expansion is permitted since the mandrel 10 shift downwardly in the housing 14, the seal assembly 13 maintaining appropriate sealing relation with the periphery of the mandrel under the constant pack-off force provided by the highly compressed spring 22. To insure that the mandrel 10 moves freely within the packing assembly, a scraper can be provided in the upper portion of the apparatus. As shown, a scraper member is threaded on the upper portion of the driven clutch member 21, this scraper having circumferentially spaced slots 121 opening through the upper end of the scraper to provide springlike arms 122 that urge upper fingers 123 of the scraper member against the periphery of the mandrel. The upper edges 124 of the fingers may be constituted as knife edges so that lowering movement of the mandrel 10 will cause such knife edges to scrape its outer surface and insure that foreign substances do not adhere thereto, which might interfere with the appropriate operation of the mandrel 10, the packer body 12 and the seal assembly 13. To further insure against the dropping of debris into the seal assembly, a wiper ring 125 is mounted in a groove 126 between the lower portion of the scraper device 120 and the spring seat 24. The wiper ring 125 bears against the periphery of the mandrel 10.

One field of use for the packer A is in injecting high temperature, high pressure steam through the packer into the well bore. The heat may cause the asbestos or other material of which the packing element '75 is composed to soften somewhat. When this happens, a proper pack-off in the well casing can be maintained merely by elevating the mandrel 10 and reengaging the lower clutch 113, 114, an additional imposition of torque on the tubing string C and mandrel being provided, which turning effort is transmitted through the retainer housing and key 111 to the setting sleeve 94, the latter feeding upwandly along the body 12 to a further extent, the upward thrust being transmitted to the thrust sleeve 88, thrust plate 87 and compression sleeve 84 to further shorten the packing assembly 33 and expand it outwardly more firmly against the wall of the well casing C and periphery of the body 12 of the tool. When the well packer has reached a stabilized elevated temperature condition, the taking of a proper upstrain on the tubing string C, which, for example, may be about 5000 pounds, and the application of proper right-hand torque on the tubing string and packer, which, for example, may be about 1500 foot-pounds, will insure that the well packer is anchored in packed-off condition in the well casing. The tubing string C can now be lowered to bring the upper clutch member 11 adjacent to the upper driven clutch member 21, so that subsequent cooling of the tubing string will allow its considerable contraction, extensive longitudinal leeway being provided for movement of the mandrel 10 within the packer without imposing any upward strain thereon. By way of example, the tubing string and packer may cool down considerably from its elevated temperature, the mandrel 10 moving upwardly freely through the well packer, except for the frictional resistance that it encounters in sliding through the packing assembly 13.

Assuming the well packer A is to be released and retrieved from the well casing, the tubing string C is elevated until the lower driving clutch member 113 engages the lower driven clutch member 114, and a sufiicient upstrain is taken to shear the pins 101 securing the retainer housing 98 to the setting sleeve 94. Ordinarily, these pins will collectively have a substantial shear value, since their inadvertent disruption is not desired until the well packer is to be retrieved from the well casing. Upon disruption of the shear pins 1M, the retainer housing 98 is shifted upwardly along the setting sleeve 94 until the driving clutch member 113 engages the lower end of the latter. At this time, the upper restraining portion 97 of the retainer sleeve is disposed well above the foot portions 91 of the thrust sleeve 88, allowing the feet 91 to expand outwardly into the circu-mferentially recessed portion 100 of the retainer housing 98, the inner foot portions 92 of the thrust sleeve shifting out of the setting sleeve groove 93.

With the disconnection of the thrust sleeve 88 from the setting sleeve 94, the upward thrust on the packing assembly 33 and also on the lower expander 56 is removed, which then allows the tubing string C and mandrel 10 to shift upwardly, carrying the setting sleeve 94 and body 12 upwardly with it to move the upper expander 36 upwardly of the slips 48, releasing the latter from the well casing. As the upward motion of the body 12 continues, it carries the slip housing 45 upwardly with it, because of the swivel interconnection 42, 43, until the housing at the lower end of its slots 47 engages the lower end of the slips 48, pulling them loose from the casing B, if they have not previously been released from the casing. The lower expander 56 will drop downwardly as the packing assembly 33 moves downwardly relatively of the body 12, as the latter is moved upwardly therewithin until the expander thrust sleeve 60 is engaged by an upwardly facing shoulder 150 at the upper portion of the lower body section 32. The compression sleeve 84 and packing assembly 33 can shift downwardly relatively of the body 12 (actual-1y the body is moving upwardly within these parts) until the upper end of the retainer housing 98 engages a shoulder 151 at the upper portion of the thrust sleeve 88. At this time, the packing element 75 will be disposed opposite a reduced diameter portion 152 on the lower body section 32, which will permit the packing element to relax and insure that it will not drag along the wall of the well casing during elevation of the apparatus therewithin. The tensile springs 65 will pull the slips 48 inwardly to their retracted positions, the well packer A now being conditioned for elevation by the tubing string C in the well casing B to the top of the well bore (FIGS. 6a, 6b).

It is, accordingly, apparent that a retrievable well :packer apparatus has been provided which can be anchored against movement in both directions in the well casing, and which can also be packed oil? in the well casing, the anchoring and packing off occurring as a result of imposing sufficient torque on the tubing string C to which the well packer A is connected. Release of the well packer occurs simply as a result of taking an upward pull on the tubing string C and on the packer parts. No reverse directions of rotation are necessary to free the slips 48 from their upper and lower expanders 36, 56. The apparatus remains anchored in packed-off condition in the well casing, despite being subjected to high temperatures and to widely varying temperatures. The tubing string C can expand and contract freely, inasmuch as the mandrel 10 can shift freely within the packer body, the packing assembly 33 always maintaining a proper seal against the periphery of the mandrel. In the event the packer tends to loosen under the varying temperatures to which the equipment might be subjected, additional packing oflf and anchoring can take place as a result of applying torque to the apparatus through the tubing string C.

I claim:

1. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said slip means against the conduit; and means independent of said shifting means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit.

2. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said slip means against the conduit: and a threaded interconnection between said body and abutment means operable independently of said shifting means whereby rotation of said abutment means threads said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit.

3. In a well packer adapted to be set in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; means for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said slip means against the conduit; and means independent of said shifting means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing means against the conduit.

4. In a well packer adapted to be set in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to be expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; means for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said slip means against the conduit; and threaded interconnection between said body and abutment means operable independently of said shifting means whereby rotation of said abutment means threads said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing means against the conduit.

5. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means 'for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said slip means against the conduit; and means independent of said shifting means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection which, when released, permits retraction of said packing means from the conduit.

6. In a well packer adapted to be set in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; means for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said slip means against the conduit; and means independent of said shifting means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing means against the conduit; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection which, when released, permits movement of said abutment means away from said expander means and retraction of said packing means from the conduit.

7. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; initially retracted packing means on said body; upper and lower abutment means on said body engaging upper and lower end portions, respectively, of said packing means; and means interconnecting said body and said lower abutment means whereby right-hand rotation of said lower abutment means shifts said lower abutment means toward said upper abutment means to expand said packing means against the conduit; means for rotating said lower abutment means; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection; and means for releasing said releasable connection to permit retraction of said packing means from the conduit without rotation of said lower abutment means.

8. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; initially retracted packing means on said body; upper and lower abutment means on said body engaging upper and lower end portions, respectively, of said packing means; and a threaded interconnection between said body and said lower abutment means whereby right-hand rotation of said lower abutment means shifts said lower abutment means on said body toward said upper abutment means to expand said packing means against the conduit; means for rotating said lower abutment means; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection; and means for releasing said releasable connection to permit retraction of said packing means from the conduit without r tion of said lower abutment means.

9. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said said slip means against the conduit; means independent of said shifting means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; and means for rotating said abutment means on said body.

10. In a well packer adapted to be set in a well conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; means for shifting said expander means and slip means with respect to each other to expand said slip means against the conduit; a threaded interconnection between said body and abutment means operable independently of said shifting means whereby rotation of said abutment means threads said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing means against the conduit; and means for rotating said abutment means on said body.

11. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; means interconnecting said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; and means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit. 7

12. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; a threaded interconnection between said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; and a threaded interconnection between said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means threads said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit.

13. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; means interconnecting said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; and means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing means against the conduit.

14. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; a threaded interconnection between said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; and a threaded interconnection between said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means threads said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing means against the conduit.

15. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; means interconnecting said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; and means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing means against the conduit; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection which, when released, permits movement of said abutment means away from said expander means and retraction of said packing means from the conduit.

16. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; silp means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby right-hand rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; a mandrel connectible to the tubular string and disposed in said body; means on said mandrel connectible to said abutment means for transmitting right-hand rotary motion of the tubular string through the mandrel to said abutment means to cause said abutment means to expand said packing means against the conduit; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection; and means for releasing said releasable connection to permit retraction of said packing means from the conduit.

17. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; initially retracted packing means on said body having one end portion engaging said expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing means; tine-ans interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby right-hand rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body toward said expander means to expand said packing mean-s against the conduit; 21 mandrel connectible to the tubular string and disposed in said body; means on said mandrel connectible to said abutment means for transmitting right-hand rotary motion of the tubular string through the mandrel to said abutment means to cause said abutment means to expand said packing means against the conduit; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection; and means for releasing said releasable connection to permit retraction of said packing means from the conduit.

18. In a well packer adapted'to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; initially retracted packing means on said body; upper and lower abutment means on said body engaging upper and lower end portions, respectively, of said packing means; means interconnecting said body and said lower abutment means whereby right-hand rotation of said lower abutment means shifts said lowerabutment means toward said upper abutment means to expand said packing means against the conduit; a mandrel connectible to the tubular string and disposed in said body; and means on said mandrel connectible to said lower abutment means for transmitting righthand rotary motion of the tubular string through the mandrel to said lower abutment means to cause said lower abutment means to expand said packing means against the conduit; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection; and means for releasing said releasable connection to permit retraction of said packing means from the conduit.

19. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; means interconnecting said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; means responsive to rotation of the tubular string for rotating said body; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; a mandrel connectible to the tubular string and disposed in said body; and means on said body connectible to said abutment means for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string through the mandrel to said abutment means.

20. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; means interconnecting said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; axially movable clutch means releasably connectible to said body for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string to said body; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; a mandrel connectible to the tubular string and disposed in said body; and clutching means on said mandrel movable axially by said mandrel into clutching engagement with said abutment means for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string through said mandrel to said abutment means.

21. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; means interconnecting said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; mandrel means movable longitudinally in said body and connectible to the tubular string; upper clutching means releasably connectible to said body for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string to said body; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; and lower clutching means on said mandrel means movable upwardly by said mandrel means into clutching engagement with said abutment means for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string through said mandrel means to said abutment means; said mandrel means being axially shiftable in said body by the tubular string to selectively connect said upper clutching means to said body or said lower clutching means to said abutment means.

22. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means; means interconnecting said body and expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said expander means along said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; mandrel means movable longitudinally in said body and connectible to the tubular string; upper clutching means releasably connectible to said body for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string to said body; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; and lower clutching means on said mandrel means movable upwardly by said mandrel means into clutching engagement with said abutment means for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string through said mandrel means to said abutment means; said mandrel means being axially shiftable in said body by the tubular string to selectively connect said upper clutching means to said body or said lower clutching means to said abutment means; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection releasable by manipulation of said mandrel means, which, when released, permits retraction of said packing means from the conduit.

23. In apparatus to be lowered in a conduit string in a well bore: barrier means in the conduit string having a passage; a mandrel movable longitudinally in said passage; scraper means carried by said barrier means and encompassing said mandrel, said scraper means having edges contacting the periphery of said mandrel to scrape the same upon longitudinal movement of said mandrel in said passage.

24. In apparatus to be lowered in a conduit string in a well bore: barrier means in the conduit string having a passage; a mandrel movable longitudinally in said passage; scraper means carried by said barrier means and encompassing said mandrel, said scraper means having spring-like inwardly movable arms, said arms including upper edges contacting the periphery of said mandrel around its circumference to scrape said mandrel upon downward movement of said mandrel in said passage.

25. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; upper and lower expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit to anchor said body therewithin against longitudinal mo'vementin both directions; an initially retracted packing structure on said body having one end portion engaging said lower expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing structure; and means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing structure against the conduit.

26. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip instrumentalities on said body; upper and lower expander means engageable with said slip i-nstrument-alities to expand said slip instrumentalities against the conduit to anchor said body therewithin against longitudinal movement in both directions; an initially retracted packing structure on said body having one end portion engaging said lower expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end .portion of said packing structure; and means interconnecting said body and one of said means whereby relative rotation between said body and said one of said means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing structure against the conduit.

27. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; upper and lower expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit to anchor said body therewithin against longitudinal movement in both directions; means interconnecting said body and upper expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said upper expander means along said slip means and toward said lower expander means to expand said slip means against the conduit; an initially retracted packing structure on said body having one end portion engaging said lower expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing structure; means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment, means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing structure against the conduit; a mandrel connectible to the tubular string and disposed in said body; upper clutching means connected to said mandrel and releasably connectible to said body for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string to said body; and lower clutching means on said mandrel movable upwardly by said mandrel into clutching engagement with said abutment means for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string through said mandrel to said abutment means; said mandrel means being axially shiftable in said body by the tubular string to selectively connect said upper clutching means to said body or said lower clutching means to said abutment means.

28. In a well packer adapted to be lowered on a tubular string in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; upper and lower expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit to anchor said body therewithin against longitudinal movement in both directions; means interconnecting said body and upper expander means whereby rotation of said body shifts said upper expander means along said slip means and toward said lower expander means to expand said slip means against the conduit; an initially retracted packing structure on said body having one end portion engaging said lower expander means; abutment means on said body engaging the other end portion of said packing structure; means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing structure against the conduit; a mandrel connectible to the tubular string and disposed in said body; upper clutching means connected to said mandrel and releasably connectible to said body for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string to said body; and lower clutching means on said mandrel movable upwardly by said mandrel into clutching engagement with said abutment means for transmitting rotary motion of the tubular string through said mandrel to said abutment means; said mandrel means being axially shiftable in said body by the tubular string to selectively connect said upper clutching means to said body or said lower clutching means to said abutment means; said interconnecting means including a releasable connection releasable by manipulation of said mandrel which, when released, permits retraction of said packing structure from the conduit.

29. In a well packer adapted to be set in a conduit disposed in a well bore: a body; slip means on said body; expander means engageable with said slip means to expand said slip means against the conduit; packing means on said body; abutment means on said body engaging said packing means; and means interconnecting said body and abutment means whereby rotation of said abutment means shifts said abutment means along said body to expand said packing means against the conduit; said interconnecting means including a setting sleeve threaded on said 'body, a thrust sleeve releasably connected to said setting sleeve, and a retainer housing holding said thrust sleeve connected to said setting sleeve, means releasably connecting said retainer housing to said setting sleeve, said releasable connection being released to permit shifting of said ret iner housing to a position allowing disconnection 17 18 of said thrust sleeve from said setting sleeve to permit 2,567,479 9/1951 Hebard 277105 retraction of said packing means from the conduit. 3,075,584 1/1963 Brown 166--197 3,077,933 2/1963 Bigelow 166134 References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

2,117,535 5/1938 Baker et a1. 166134 2,498,791 2/1950 Clark 166 139 J. A. LEPPINK, Asszstant Exammer.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3360049 *Feb 21, 1966Dec 26, 1967Schlumberger Technology CorpApparatus for operating well tools
US3391742 *May 27, 1966Jul 9, 1968Brown Oil ToolsReleasable well packer
US3889750 *Jul 17, 1974Jun 17, 1975Schlumberger Technology CorpSetting and releasing apparatus for sidewall anchor
US4071084 *Dec 15, 1976Jan 31, 1978Brown Oil Tools, Inc.Well packer
US4116277 *Apr 12, 1977Sep 26, 1978Gray Tool CompanyFull flow tubing plug with locked anchor and method
US4176715 *Dec 23, 1977Dec 4, 1979Baker International CorporationHigh temperature well packer
US4558738 *Apr 2, 1984Dec 17, 1985Howard Sr Robert GOil well casing scraper
US4601333 *Apr 29, 1985Jul 22, 1986Hughes Tool CompanyThermal slide joint
US4928762 *Feb 13, 1989May 29, 1990Halliburton CompanyFor use in a well bore
US6666275Aug 2, 2001Dec 23, 2003Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Bridge plug
US7735562Apr 12, 2007Jun 15, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedTieback seal system and method
US8561709Apr 12, 2007Oct 22, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedLiner top packer seal assembly and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/139, 166/175, 166/182
International ClassificationE21B33/12, E21B33/129
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/1292, E21B33/1208
European ClassificationE21B33/12F, E21B33/129F2