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Publication numberUS3290028 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1966
Filing dateJun 9, 1964
Priority dateJun 9, 1964
Publication numberUS 3290028 A, US 3290028A, US-A-3290028, US3290028 A, US3290028A
InventorsKruzan Albert W
Original AssigneeBorg Warner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas fired clothes dryer
US 3290028 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 6, 1966 A. W. KRUZAN 3,290,028

GAS FIRED CLOTHES DRYER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 9, 1964 Dec. 6, 1966 A. w. KRuzAN GAS FIRED CLOTHES DRYER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 9, 1964 .lllllllllllllllx 5 fyi/M@ @Meri w ffujzz f ma MMA United States Patent() 3,290,028 GAS FIRED CLOTHES DRYER Albert W. Kruzan, Fort Madison, Iowa, assgnor to Borg- Warner Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois 'Filed June 9, 1964, Ser. No. 373,813 Claims. (Cl. 263-33) The present invention relates to gas dryers of the type generally used in drying fabrics and more particularly to the air heating system in such dryers.

Air is heated in a gas dryer by agas ame. The flame is maintained in a part of the dryer separated from the container in which articles to be dried are held. Air upon entry into the dryer llows past the liame thereby being heated prior to being fed into -thegarticle container. To sufficiently heat the drying air, it isnecessary -to provide a high or hot flame. However, a high flame presents problems because, if not properly housed, it will overheat the exposed structure of the dryer, i.e., the cabinet. This is dangerous, as a housewife can be burned if the cabinet reaches a relatively high temperature. Furthermore, the motor, controls, and' other .structure is heated above desirable operating temperatures.

Accordingly, `it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved structure for housing the flame in a gas dryer which efliciently heats the drying air while insuring that the cabinet, controls, and like structure of the dryer are not raised to an unsafe and undesirable temperature. The present invention will lind particular, but by no means exclusive, utility in a gas clothes dryer` which utilizes a gas ame lto `heat air upon entry into the dryer and then directs it through the clothes container and exhausts it from the machine. The present invention being directed to using a burner box which orients the gas iiame and provides .streams of air thereabout so as to transmit a minimum amount of the heat to the dryer cabinet and controls while efliciently heating the liowing air.

It is a more particular object of the present invention along the lines of the above to improve the air Vflow system in the burner box portion of a gas dryer to more effectively heat the air by permitting use of a higher or hotter liame than has been heretofore used without requiring elaborate insulating structure.

It is an overall object of the present invention to provide an improved burner box assembly for use in a gas dryer which is economical to manufacture and easy to maintain while being adaptable to standard gas dryers.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more clearly understood from the description of the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation of a gas dryer constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 isa perspective of a gas dryer showing a burner box positioned in the dryer;

FIG. 3 is a section taken along 3 3 in FIG. 1 showing the air circulating paths through the dryer; and

FIG. 4 is an elevation of the burner box.

While the invention will be described with a preferred embodiment, it will be understood that I do not intend to limit the invention to such an embodiment but on the contrary intend to cover all alternatives, modifications and equivalents that maybe included within the spirit and scope of the invention as dened by the appended claims.

Turning to FIG. v1 andthe gas dryer 10 there shown embodying the present invention, the latter includes an lCC outer cabinet 11 having a top 11a, a front wall 11b and side walls 11c, 11d. A rear cabinet wall 11e is best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. A framework 12 is provided in the cabinet for supporting the operative structure ofthe dryer. Viewing FIGS. 1 and 2 together, rotatably supported by the framework 12 is a container or drum 14 for receiving clothes and like articles to be dried. Presently, the drum 14 is of cylindrical shape with an open front end 14a and a substantially closed rear end 14b. An outside door 15 hinged to the cabinet front wall 11a permits access to the drum vinterior through a circular cabinet opening 16 exposing the drum open front end 14a.

For directing dry hot air into the drum 14 and removing moisture-laden air therefrom, an air circulation or duct system is provided. The duct system includes an input 1S for receiving hot air and directing it to the drum 14, and an output opening 19 for .carrying away moisturepladen air from the drum 14. Air is forced into the drum by a blower 20 rotatably mounted on framework 12 adjacent the drum end 14b. The blower has an integral hub 20a coaxial with a rear drum support shaft 14e` and is mounted for independent rotation with respect to the drum. The hub 20 is coupled to a drive pulley 21 which is ,rotated to impart rotation to the blower. The rear portion of drum 14 has a series of openings in an annular axially projecting portion 22 for receiving hot air from the blower 20. The air, after absorbing moisture from the clothes, is blown out the front of the drum by way of a series of openings in an annular wall portion 24 comprising a part of the drum front end 14a. An arcuate vduct 25 is provided about the door opening 16 to communicate with the drum openings 24 and receive the expelled moistureladen air. The duct system output 19 receives the moist air and carries it rearwardly along the bottom of the cabinet 11 to a suitable exhaust connectionl (not shown).

In the illustrative embodiment one motor (not shown) powers both the blower and drum. Coupling is through a common belt 26 which rotates the blower drive pulley 21 and a drum drive pulley 27. As described, the blower drive pulley is directly connected to the blower hub. However, the drum drive pulley 27 transmits drive to the drum indirectly through a drive shaft 28 and a drive wheel 29 in contact with the front portion of the side wall of the cylindrical drum. Front end support for the drum is provided by the drive wheel 29 on one side and an idler wheel 30 on the other side (see FIG. 1).

For heating the air prior to feeding it into the drum 14, a burner 'box assembly 33 is provided in the input side of the air flow system. As herein illustrated, the burner box is of generally longitudinal shape and is mounted in the upper rear portion of the cabinet interior, i.e., adjacent the intersection of the cabinet top 11a and rear wall 11e. Relatively cool air is drawn by the blower 20 into the cabinet interior and into the burner box assembly 33 through an opening 34 in the cabinet rear wall 11e.

In accordance with the present invention, a flow of air is maintained through the burner box assembly 33 from top 'to bottom and about a flame 35 to carry heat away from the ame while preventing the cabinet top, walls and structure within the dryer cabinet from overheating. As herein illustrated, the burner box assembly includes a burner 36 disposed longitudinally in an upper portion of the burner enclosure dened by a cover 38, a rear wall 39, a front wall 40, and a bottom 41. The preferred embodiment of burner 36 has a plurality of openings 42 along its underside (see FIG. 4) for directing gas to the flame 35 vwhich projects downwardly.v The burner is supported in along a substantially horizontal axis.

The air drawn through the cabinet opening 34 enters the illustrated burner box assembly by way of the rear wall, either through a plurality of circular openings 44 near the bottom of the assembly providing a first stream of air, or through a longitudinal slot 45 adjacent the top of the assembly providing a second stream of air (see FIG. 3). The air entering the bottom openings 44 main-` tains a relatively cool zone A in the lower rear portion of the burner box assembly.

The air entering the top of the burner box assembly splits into several paths. To establish a pair of relatively cool zones B and C on either side of the burner and llame, one air llow path is along the rear wall 39 and another air flow path is over the top of the burner 36 and through a longitudinal opening 46 established by setting out an upper front wall portion 40a in relation to a lower front wall portion 40b. This latter llow of air re-enters the burner box assembly through a plurality of openings 47 (see FIG. 4) in the lower wall portion 40b and thereby maintains a relatively cool air zone C above and in front of the burner and llame. It is, of course, clear that though the air is identified as relatively cool, it becomes heated in traveling through the respective zones. However, by maintaining a continual flow of fresh air into the zones, the areas about the burner flame are maintained cooler than if the hot llame or hot air leaving directly from the llame were passed through the zones and in contact with the burner box assembly structure.

The main air path or stream is centrally through the burner box. To channel the main air to flow on either side of the llame to elllciently heat it` as well as aid in establishing the cool zones A, B, and C, a dellector 48 is provided. The latter is mounted, in the present instance, below the burner 36 on the lower front wall portion 4Gb of the burner box assembly and is provided with a longitudinal slot 48 through which the llame 35 projects. The air llow is down through the opening and on either side of the llame thereby maintaining a flame tip 35a below the burner 36.

After being heated by the flame, the air passes into the lower portion of the burner box assembly and is deflected by a diverter 49 mounted on the rear wall 39 above the openings 44. This directs the hot air into the duct system input 18 for subsequent blowing into the drum 14. The diverter member 49 is positioned between zones A and B and serves to direct the air from these zones into the main stream of hot air flow where it mixes and becomes heated after performing its cooling or insulating function.

From the foregoing, it is clear that the novel burner box assembly here shown utilizes both a downwardly projecting gas llame and a downward llow of air to insulate the outer structure of the burner box assembly from the flame and main stream of hot air. By maintaining the outer structure ofthe burner box assembly cooler, the dryer framework structure supporting, and in proximity with, the burner box assembly is also maintained at a safe, relatively cool temperature. On the .other hand, a continual flow of air is maintained about the llame 35. This assures a maximum exposure of air to the flame for ellicient heating of the air. Thus, the heat produced by the llame is elllciently utilized to improve the overall operation of the dryer.

Although a plurality of openings have been here shown as provided in the underside of the burner 36, it would be possible to use a single opening for providing a downwardly projecting flame. The important operation of the present invention is to provide a downwardly projecting llame so that the upper portion of the burner assembly is not heated, as well as directing streams or paths of air about the main heating portion of the assembly, the burner and flame portion, so as to insulate the latter from the burner assembly outer structure and thereby preventoverheating of the latter. The advantageous result is that an efficient yet safe dryer operation is effected.

What is claimed is:

1. In an air heating system for a gas dryer of the type customarily used for drying clothes, the combination comprising: a cabinet having a top and sides; a framework within said cabinet; a container for receiving articles to be dried rotatably mounted on said framework; a duct system having an input for directing air into said container and an output for carrying air out of the container; a burner box mounted on said framework below said cabinet top and having an air input for receiving fresh air from outside the cabinet and an air output for directing heated air into the input of said duct system; a burner mounted in said box having at least one openingin its underside for feeding gas to a downwardly projecting flame having a tip; and a dellector in said box disposed below said burner and having a longitudinal opening through which saidgas llame projects, said burner box air input directing the entering fresh air downward carrying the heat of the llame away from said cabinet top and sides and into said duct system input and maintaining said llame tip below said burner, preventing overheating of said cabinet top and sides.

2. In an air heating system for a gas diyer of the type customarily used for drying clothes, the combination comprising: a cabinet; a framework within said cabinet; a drum for receiving articles to be dried rotatably mounted on said framework; a duct system having an input for directing air into said container and an output for carrying l air out of the container; a burner box assembly mounted on said framework having an air input for receiving fresh air from outside the cabinet and an air output for directing heated aid into said duct system input; a burner mounted in said box and having its axis substantially horizontal with a plurality of openings in its underside for feeding a gas llame having a tip, and a deflector in said box disposed below said burner and having a longitudinal opening through which said gas flame projects, said deflector dellning a main air stream substantially through a central portion of said burner box assembly,

said main air stream being directed downwardly about said burner, past said llame and through said longitudinal opening so as to maintain said flame tip below said burner and carry the heat of the llame away to prevent overheating of said dryer cabinet and framework, respectively.

3. The combination of claim 2 and including means for establishing a pair of cooling air streams on each side of the main heated air stream to effect relatively cool air zones about the main heated air zone.

4. In an air heating system for a gas dryer of the type customarily used in drying clothes, a combination comprising: a cabinet having a top and side walls; a framework within said cabinet; a drum for receiving articles to be dried rotatably supported on said framework; a

. duct system having an input for directing air into said drum and an output for removing air from the drum; a burner box assembly mounted on said framework at the rear of said cabinet and having an air input for receiving fresh air from outside the cabinet and an air output for directing heated air into the input of said duct system, said box assembly having a cover, bottom and front and rear walls respectively; a burner mounted in said assembly and having at least one opening in its underside for feedinggas to a downwardly projecting llame having a tip; said air input including upper and lower openings respectively in said burner box assembly rear wall for receiving air, said lower openings providing a source of relatively cool air for maintaining the lower portion of said burner box assembly cool, said upper openings providing a source of air for llrstpassing in proximity and about said burner flame and secondly, for

relatively cool air to insulate the burner and' flame from contact with outer portions of said burner box assembly, References Cited by the Examiner said respective streams of air combining and leaving the UNITED STATES PATENTS lower portion of said burner box assembly and entering the of Said duct System Suhr up er opening above said burner and along the front 0f sail burner box front wall to insulate the upper and front FREDERICK L MATTESON, IR., Przmary Examiner. portions of said burner box assembly from the high JOHN I. CAMBY, Examiner.

heat of said burner ame and hot air directly contacting lo said flame.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2018505 *Oct 9, 1931Oct 22, 1935Acme Sheet Metal WorksDrier
US2225775 *Jan 26, 1940Dec 24, 1940Garrett David LApparatus for deparaffining oil wells
US2673727 *May 24, 1952Mar 30, 1954Lovell Mfg CoDrier
US2690905 *Jul 2, 1951Oct 5, 1954Lovell Mfg CoDrier
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4065253 *Aug 20, 1976Dec 27, 1977W. M. Cissell Manufacturing CompanyLaundry dryer
US4137645 *Sep 12, 1977Feb 6, 1979W. M. Cissell Manufacturing CompanyLaundry dryer
US4207056 *Nov 6, 1978Jun 10, 1980Bowley Robert JMethod and apparatus for improving the fuel efficiency of a laundry dryer
Classifications
U.S. Classification432/105, 432/116, 126/110.00D, 432/115
International ClassificationD06F58/20, D06F58/26
Cooperative ClassificationD06F58/26
European ClassificationD06F58/26