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Publication numberUS3291057 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1966
Filing dateNov 12, 1964
Priority dateNov 12, 1964
Also published asDE1528657A1, DE1528657B2, DE1528657C3
Publication numberUS 3291057 A, US 3291057A, US-A-3291057, US3291057 A, US3291057A
InventorsJoseph T Carle
Original AssigneeBorg Warner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas separator for submersible pump
US 3291057 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. T- CARLE GAS SEPARATOR FOR SUBMERSIBLE PUMP Dec. 13, 1966 Filed Nov. 12, 1964 jnverzirr -fi5 vk I Caz r'ze ,2 9% w @m United States Patent Oflice 329L057 Patented Dec. 13, 1966 GAS EPARATOR FOR SUBMERSIBLE PUMP Joseph T. (Iarle, Tulsa, (Okla, assiguor to Borg-Warner Corporation, a corporation of Illinois Filed Nov. 12, 1964, Ser. No. 410,637 14 Claims. ((11. 103113) This invention relates to gas separtors. More particularly, it relates to a gas separator for a submersible motor pump assembly of the type used in oil and water wells.

It has long been a practice to utilize a submersible motor pump assembly disposed within a well casing of an oil or water well to pump well fluid from the well. In many such applications, substantial quantities of gaseous substances are present in the well which adversely affect the pumping operation if allowed to enter the impeller portion of the pump. In extreme situations, excessive quantities of gas have caused the pump to gas lock, completely restricting the flow of well fluid. For this reason, it has been found desirable to provide the pump unit with a gas separator adapted to remove the gaseous substances from the fluid being pumped to insure efflcient and continuous operation of the motor pump assembly.

An example of such a gas separator is shown in U.S. patent application No. 311,937 filed September 24, 1963, by Joseph T. Carle, entitled, Gas Separator, which is a continuation of application No. 132,167 filed August 17, 1961, now Patent 3,175,501.

The gas separator disclosed in the above-mentioned application is adapted to be positioned between a submersible motor unit and submersible pump unit in surrounding relation to an interconnecting drive shaft which is operable by the motor. The pump unit is positioned above the motor unit and includes a downwardly directed impeller inlet of annular cross section surrounding the drive shaft.

The gas separator includes an elongated housing extending downwardly from the pump unit which is divided into an outer annular chamber adjacent the housing and an inner annular chamber adjacent the drive shaft by an inner sleeve or flow tube extending downwardly from the pump inlet. The housing is closed at the bottom to form a reservoir, and the housing includes inlet openings at its upper end to allow entry of well fluid into the housing above the reservoir.

A separator pump is provided at the bottom of the reservoir which includes a gas separator impeller secured to and driven by the drive shaft. The gas separator impeller is of the axial inflow-radial outflow type and includes an upwardly directed inlet adjacent the drive shaft and a radially directed outlet disposed in spaced relation to the housing wall. A cross-over housing is provided within the separator housing which is adapted to direct well fluid from the outer reservoir defining chamber to the gas separator impeller inlet and from the gas separator impeller outlet to the inner annular chamber which communicates with the inlet of the motor pump assembly along the drive shaft.

In the gas separator described, well fluid enters the reservoir chamber through the openings in the top of the housing and passes downwardly through the reservoir chamber and cross-over housing into the upwardly directed gas separator pump impeller inlet adjacent the drive shaft. The fluid is pumped radially outwardly and returned by way of the cross-over housing to the inner annular chamber defined by the flow tube and drive shaft. The well fluid travels upwardly in this inner annular chamber into the pump impeller inlet.

Movement of well fluid in the manner described effects removal of entrained gas in several ways. First, gas is separated from the well fluid as it enters the openings in the separator housing. Further, the reservoir is adapted to retain sufiicient quantities of well fluid to allow gas which may enter to bubble off before the fluid enters the separator pump. Additionally, as the fluid passes through the separator pump, it is caused to reverse direction, further effecting separation of entrained gas.

In addition to the above, the gas separator of the previously mentioned application is particularly adopted to recover from a gas surge or pump-off condition wherein substantial quantities of gas are present in the well which curtail pumping of well fluid existing within the well. The separator pump impeller inlet is upwardly directed and therefore natural gravity flow causes well fluid to enter the impeller of the separator pump from the reservoir chamber. Thus, when the gas surge has terminated, well fluid naturally flows into the gas separator impeller inlet for transfer to the pump inlet. The cross-over housing which includes the gas separator impeller is vented to insure displacement of entrapped gas as the well fluid enters the inlet of the cross-over from the chamber reservoir.

Separators of the type described have generally proven to be satisfactory. However, in certain instances, it has been found that quantities of gas have entered the reservoir chamber through the inlet openings in the separator housing Wall, and it has further been found that in certain instances quantities of gas have succeeded in travelling through the separator pump and into the inner chamber defined by the flow tube and shaft.

Accordingly, it is the principal object of the present invention to provide an improved form of gas separator for a submersible motor-pump assembly.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a gas separator for a submersible pump which includes a portion adapted to momentarily retain quantities of well fluid in a generally quiescent condition isolated from the gas-fluid mixture in the well to allow entrained gas to bubble off prior to entry of the fluid into the separator reservoir.

A related object of the present invention is to provide a gas separator for a submersible motor pump which includes a series of retention cups adapted to momentarily retain quantities of well fluid in a quiescent condition to allow entrained or occluded gas to bubble off prior to the entry of the well fluid into the separator reservoir.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a gas separator for a submersible motor pump which includes a plurality of retention cups having a relatively small discharge area as compared to inlet area so as to providea controlled rate of discharge of well fluid into the separator reservoir to effect temporary retention of quantities of the well fluid within the cup to allow release of entrained gas.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a gas separator for a submersible motor pump which includes a plurality of retention cups adapted to direct well fluid into the separator reservoir which have inlet openings disposed in elevated relation to discharge openings so as to prevent inadvertent entry of gaseous substances rising within the annular space between the separator and the well casing.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide a gas separator for a submersible pump which is adapted to effect removal of gas from the inner annular chamber of the separator defined by the motor pump drive shaft and the cross-over flow tube.

These and other objects of the invention will become apparent with reference to the following description and the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevational sectional view of a gas separator incorporating various of the features of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a transverse sectional view taken along line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of a portion of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1 showing various other features of the invention.

In an illustrated embodiment of the invention shown in the drawing, a gas separator generally designated G is disposed within a well defined by a casing C. The separator G is coaxially aligned with and interposed between a generally cylindrical submersible motor M and a generally cylindrical submersible well pump P, both of which are shown schematically in FIGURE 1. The motor M is disposed below the pump within the casing C and is operatively connected to the pump by a generally vertical drive shaft which includes a portion S extending through the gas separator. The motor M may be provided with an integrally formed submersible seal unit which surrounds the drive shaft S and which is adapted to prevent the entry of well fluid into the motor. Alternatively a separate generally cylindrical seal unit U as shown schematically in FIGURE 1 may be used.

Very generally the gas separator G of the illustrated embodiment includes an elongated separator housing 11 disposed in surrounding relation to the drive shaft S, which includes splines 13 at each end for connection with cooperating segments (not shown) of the drive shaft associated with the motor M and pump P. The separator housing is divided into an outer reservoir chamber 15 adapted to initially receive fluid from the well through a series of inlets in the housing, and an inner flow chamber 17 which is in communication with the motor pump P and adapted to supply it with generally gas free well fluid for subsequent pumping from the well. This division is effected by a flow tube 19 extending longitudinally intermediate the shaft S and separator housing 11.

A separator pump 21 including an impeller 23 operable by the drive shaft S and a cross-over housing 25 is disposed adjacent the bottom of the separator housing 11. Operation of the impeller 23 effects transfer of well fluid fromthe outer reservoir chamber 15 to the inner annular chamber 17 through the cross-over housing 25.

A series of spaced apart open-ended retention cups 27 are disposed in surrounding relation to the separator housing 11 adjacent the well fluid inlets and define with the housing a series of annular retention chambers 29 which initially receive the well fluid.

The chambers so formed include generally cylindrical inlet areas which are relatively larger than the inlets into the reservoir chamber 15 thus providing a controlled rate of discharge of fluid into the reservoir chamber. Additionally the retention chambers 29 are of suflicient capacity to effect momentary retention of well fluid isolated from the turbulent gas-fluid mixture existing in the well by virtue of the controlled discharge rate so as to allow entrained gas to bubble olf prior to entry of the well fluid into the reservoir chamber.

Also, the inlets to the retention chambers defined by the retention cups are disposed in elevated relation to the inlets to the reservoir chamber 15 thus preventing gas bubbling upwardly within the well casing C from inadvertently entering the separator housing and impairing pump operation.

In addition to the above, a bleed-off tube 31 is provided which communicates between the inner annular chamber 17 and the well defined by the casing C. This bleedoff tube allows escape of such gas as may have passed through the retention cup chambers 29, reservoir chamber 15 and separator pump 21 and entered the flow tube so as to effectively prevent the gas from travelling into the pump P.

More specifically, and as best seen in FIGURE 1, the elongated separator housing 11 is of generally cylindrical configuration and is disposed coaxially with respect to the rotatable drive shaft S to form the outer wall of the outer reservoir chamber 15.

The separator housing 11 includes a lower reservoir defining portion 33 having a diameter smaller than the well casing so as to allow for the flow of well fluid therebetween. The reservoir defining portion is closed at the bottom by nipple 35 secured thereto as by cooperating threaded portions 37. The nipple extends radially inwardly into rotatable sealing engagement with the shaft S. A flange 39 is provided on the nipple 35 for connect on of the separator to the seal unit U.

The separator housing 11 further includes an upper portion defined by a generally vertically extending cylindrical support tube 41 having a diameter smaller than the lower portion 33. The support tube 41 and the lower reservoir defining portion 33 are connected by an annular spacer ring 43 which includes a series of radially directed threaded aperatures 45 including set screws 47 in contact with the flow tube 19 and adapted to maintain the relative spaced apart relation between the separator housing 11 and the flow tube 19.

The support tube 41 includes a plurality of rows of generally horizontally elongated slots 49 disposed at predetermined vertically spaced intervals about the cylindrical surface of the support tube which form the inlet openings into the annular reservoir chamber 15, to allow entry of well fluid. A sufiicient number of rows of slotsare provided so as to insure adequate flow of well fluid into the reservoir chamber during the pumping operation.

An upper end 51 of the support tube 41 is closed by a nipple 53 which includes a depending sleeve 55 which extends into the end 51 of the tube. The nipple 53 further includes a cylindrical bore surrounding the drive shaft S which forms therewith an annular inlet passageway 57 to direct flowing well fluid to the pump P. The nipple is provided with a counter bore 59 adapted to be engaged by a co-acting member (not shown) formed on the pump P to effect communication between the pump inlet and the inlet passageway 57.

As best seen in FIGURE 1, the flow tube 19 which. divides the separator housing 11 into an outer reservoir chamber 15 and an inner annular chamber 17 is secured to the nipple 53 as by threads 61 and depends therefrom in coaxial aligned relation to the drive shaft S and theseparator housing 11. The shaft S is supported within the flow tube 19 by a plurality of spider bearing 63 which include radially directed spaced apart ribs 65 (best seen in FIGURE 3) which allow for the passage of fluid through the inner flow chamber 17.

The flow tube 19 is connected to the lower reservoir defining portion 33 of the separator housing 11 by a gen-- erally conical cross-over support 67 which includes angularly directed opening 69 to allow passage of well fluid. The cross-over support 67 is secured to the flow tube: 19 as by threads 71 at a point spaced from a lower .end 73 of the tube and to the lower portion 33 of the separator housing 11 by threads 75. By this arrangement the flow tube provides a structural connection between the upper nipple 53 and the lower nipple 35 enabling the gas separator to support the motor M and seal unit U which are secured to the flange 39 of the nipple 35. It should be appreciated however that other portions of the structure could be used as supporting members, such as, for example, the separator housing 11 could be so constructed as to provide the necessary structural rigidity.

The lower end 73 of the flow tube 19 is connected to the cross-over housing 25 of the separator pump 21 located at the bottom of the separator housing 11 as best seen in FIGURE 1, the cross-over housing includes an upwardly directed flange 77 which telescopically receives the end 73 of the flow tube 19. An 0 ring seal 79 is interposed between them to effect a liquid tight seal.

The cross-over housing 25 includes a series of circumferentially disposed alternately directed passages 81 and 83 which communicate respectively between the outer reservoir chamber 15 and a separator pump inlet 85 formed Within the housing adjacent the drive shaft S and between the inner annular chamber 17 and a separator pump discharge area 87 formed within the housing adjacent the separator housing 11. The cross-over housing 25 is secured to the lower reservoir defining portion 33 of the separator housing 11 as by a set screw 89 to prevent rotation during operation of the separator pump 21.

The separator pump impeller 23 is disposed within the cross-over housing 25 and is secured to an rotatable with the drive shaft S. The impeller is of the axial in-flow and radial out-flow type, and includes an upwardly directed inlet eye 91 adapted to receive well fluid from the inlet area 85.

Operation of the pump efiects movement of the well fluid from the reservoir chamber 15 to the inlet 85 through the passageway 81. The fluid then passes through the impeller 23 to the discharge area 87 and is directed to the inner flow chamber 17 by the passages 83. Thus a reversal of flow takes place within the separator pump, and since the impeller eye 91 is upwardly directed natural gravity flow of well fluid from the reservoir chamber 15 tends to fill the cross-over housing passage 81 to supply fluid to the gas separator impeller for pumping. To facilitate such gravitational flow when well fluid becomes available after a gas surge or a pumped off condition wherein the separator housing becomes filled with gas, a bleeder passage 93 is provided which extends between the separator pump impeller 23 and the well through the nipple 35 to allow gas to be displaced by the incoming liquid.

Referring now particularly to FIGURES l and 3, the retention cups 27 forming retention chambers 29 which initially receive well fluid prior to entry of the fluid into the reservoir chamber 15 are disposed in surrounding relation to the support tube 41 in overlying relation to the inlet slots 49.

Each of the retention cups 27 is associated with one of the rows of slots 49 in the support tube 41 and includes an outer cylindrical wall 95 having a diameter approximating the outer diameter of the reservoir defining portion 33 of the separator housing 11. A converging portion 97 extends from a lower end of the cylindrical wall radially inwardly, and terminates in an inner cylindrical bore 99 disposed immediately adjacent and below the row of slots 49 with which it is associated thus forming with the support tube the retention chamber 29.

The lower most retention cup 27 is supported by the annular spacer ring 43 which connects the flow tube 19 to the reservoir defining portion 33. The lower most row of slots 49, therefore, must be located a predetermined distance from the annular ring 43 to insure proper relative positioning of the cups 27 with respect to the slots 49. To place the retention cups in position upon the support tube 41, the upper nipple 53 is removed from the flow tube 19 at the threads 61.

The longitudinal length of the retention cups 27 is less than the longitudinal distance between the rows of slots 49 and the cups are maintained in spaced apart relation by spacer ribs 101 which depend from the under side of the converging portion 97 and engage the cylindrical wall 95 of the next preceeding cup. The spacing so provided creates a series of generally cylindrical inlet areas 103 between adjacent retention cups which allow entry of well fluid into the retention chambers 29 defined by the cylindrical walls 95 and converging portions 97 and the support tube 41. These inlet areas 103 are larger than,

and consequently of greater capacity than, the area of the associated row of inlet slots 49, in the support tube 41. Also, as the inner bore 99 of the cups surround the support tube 41 immediately below the rows of inlet slots 49, the inlet areas 103 are disposed in elevated relation to the slots 49 of each row requiring a generally downward flow of fluid in the retention chambers 29.

The retention cups 29 therefore, form quiescent areas for momentary retention of well fluid isolated from the turbulent gas-well fluid mixture within the casing C allowing entrained gas to bubble ofi prior to entry of well fluid into the reservoir chamber 15.

Further, as the inlet areas 103 to the retention c-hambers 29 defined by the spaced relationship between successive retention cup 27 are elevated with respect to the respective rows of slots 49 in the support tube 41, gas bubbling upwardly within the well is precluded from inadvertent-ly entering the reservoir chamber.

Additionally the inlet areas 103 are larger than the discharge area; defined by the particular row of slots 49 in the support tube 41 with which a particular retention cup is associated. The discharge rate of well fluid from the retention chambers 29 into the reservoir chamber is therefore controlled, further effecting momentary delay of fluid flow enabling entrained gas to bubble off prior to entry of the fluid into the reservoir chamber 15. A sufficient number of rows of retention cups 27 and slots 49 are provided to insure an adequate supply of well flui-d to the reservoir chamber during operation of the motor M and pump P.

Though the retention cups 27 of the illustrated embodiment have been described as separate elements stacked upon one another and retained in spaced relationship by the depending ribs 101, it must be appreciated that a variety of configurations may be utilized without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, retention cups may be welded directly to the support tube in the proper location with respect to the rows of slots 49, or alternately, a support tube similar to the tube 41 may be provided with integrally formed retention cups extending outwardly therefrom. In addition, the exact configuration of the retention cup may vary, within the purport of the invention disclosed. In this regard, upwardly directed genera-11y conical shaped cups may be used or cups having cylindrical outer walls and horizontally disposed flanges extending inwardly into contact with the support tube 41 may also be utilized so long as they provide the necessary cup capacity for retention and momentary delay of fluid flow.

Referring again specifically to FIGURE 1, the bleed-off tube 31 is disposed adjacent the upper end of the drive shaft S and includes an open end 105 disposed in close proximity to the drive shaft. The bleed-off tube extends radially outwardly through appropriately formed apertures in the support tube 41 and nipple 53 into communication with the well. It has been found that entrained gases which pass through the gas separator and enter the flow chamber 17 are caused to accumulate adjacent the drive shaft S by virtue of the centrifugal force imparted by the separator pump 21. As the accumulated gas travels along the drive shaft S to the motor pump inlet 57, it is intercepted at the inner end 105 of the bleed-off tube 31 and, due to the pressure differential existing between the fluid in the flow chamber 17 and the fluid in the well casing C the gas is caused to be exhausted back into the well, thus preventing entry of the gas into the pump inlet 57.

As can be seen, an improved gas separator has been provided which effectively causes momentary delay of well fluid being pumped, in a quiescent area isolated from the well turbulence to enable entrained gas to bubble off and return to the well prior to entry of the fluid into the separator reservoir. Additionally, well fluid entering the gas separator is caused to initially flow downwardly in the retention chambers thus preventing inadvertent entry of bubbling gas moving upwardly in the well. Further, accumulated gas within the flow chamber of the separator which is directly connected to the pump inlet is effectively removed by the provision of a bleed-off tube extending from the flow chamber to the well.

While the terms upward and downward and inwardly and outwardly have been used in the illustrated embodiment of the invention, it must be appreciated that these terms are only relative and not restrictive of the inventive concept illustrated.

Various of the features of the invention have been particularly shown and described, however, it should be obvious to one skilled in the art that various modification may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association, with a submersed pump; means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; means defining a retention chamber disposed in overlying relation to said inlet opening, said chamber defining means including means defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity suflicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber, said retention chamber defining means being disposed so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid in said retention chamber through said inlet and return to the well.

2. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; means defining a retention chamber disposed in overlying relation to said inlet opening, said chamber defining means including means defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well which is larger than the inlet opening in the housing so as to control the rate of fluid flow through said retention chamber into the reservoir, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity suflicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

3. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; means defining a retention chamber disposed in overlying relation to said inlet opening, said chamber defining means including means defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well which inlet is disposed in elevated relation to the inlet opening in the separator housing so as to effect downward movement of fluid in said retention chamber from said retention chamber inlet to the inlet in the separator housing, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity sufficient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

4. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; means defining a retention chamber disposed in overlying relation to said inlet opening, said chamber defining means including means defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity sufficient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well, and means defining a separate passageway providing communication between the pump communicating passageway and the exterior of said housing to allow gas contained therein to escape therefrom and return to the well.

5. In a gas separator for submersible well pump which separator includes, a gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump; means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a retention cup disposed in overlying relation to said inlet opening including portions substantially in contact with said housing and portion spaced therefrom so as to form therewith a retention chamber, a portion of said retention chamber defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity suflicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

6. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a generally cylindrical gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a retention cup including a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter greater than the diameter of the separator housing disposed in surrounding relation to a portion of said housing in overlying relation to said inlet opening to form a retention chamber thereover, said cylindrical portion further defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity sufiicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber, said retention cup being disposed so as to permit entrained gas to escape from said cup through said inlet and return to the well.

7. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a generally cylindrical gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a retention cup including a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter greater than the diameter of the separator housing disposed in surrounding relation to a portion of said housing in overlying relation to said inlet opening to form a retention chamber thereover, said cylindrical portion further defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well which inlet is larger than the inlet opening in the separator housing so as to control the rate of fluid flow through said retention chamber into said reservoir, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity suflicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

8. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a generally cylindrical gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means Within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, and means defining at least one inlet opening in the housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a retention cup including a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter greater than the diameter of the separator housing disposed in surrounding relation to a portion of said housing in overlying relation to said inlet opening to form a retention ciamber thereover, said cylindrical portion further defining an inlet adapted to initially receive the fluid from the well which inlet is disposed in elevated relation to the inlet opening in the separator housing so as to effect generally downward movement of the fluid in said retention chamber from said retention chamber inlet to the inlet in the separator housing, and said retention chamber having a fluid retaining capacity sumcient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

9. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a generally cylindrical gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, means defining a plurality of circumferentially disposed longitudinally spaced apart rows of slots in said housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a plurality of longitudinally spaced apart retention cups disposed in surrounding relation to said separator housing, each of said retention cups being disposed in overlying relation to a row of said slots and including a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter greater than the diameter of the separator housing so as to form a retention chamber thereover, the longitudinal spacing between successive cups providing inlet into said retention chambers adapted to initially receive fluid from the well, said retention chambers having a fluid retaining capacity suificient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

10. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separator includes, a generally cylindrical gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, means defining a plurality of circumferentially disposed longitudinally spaced apart rows of slots in said housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a plurality of longitudinally spaced apart retention cups disposed in surrounding relation to said separator housing, each of said retention cups being disposed in overlying relation to a row of said slots and including a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter greater than the diameter of the separator housing so as to form a retention chamber thereover, the longitudinal spacing between successive cups providing inlets into said retention chambers adapted to initially receive fluid from the well, the inlets so formed being larger than the inlets into the reservoir chamber through said row of slots so as to control the rate of fluid flow through said retention chambers into the reservoir, said retention chambers having a fluid retaining capacity suflicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

11. In a gas separator for a submersible well pump which separtor includes, a generally cylindrical gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well inoperative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, means defining a plurality of circumferentially disposed longitudinally spaced apart rows of slots in said housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a plurality of longitudinally spaced apart retention cups disposed in surrounding relation to said separator housing, each of said retention cups being disposed in overlying relation to a row of said slots and including a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter greater than the diameter of the separator housing so as to form a retention chamber thereover, the longitudinal spacing between successive cups providing inlets to said retention chambers adapted to initially receive fluid from the well, the inlets so formed being disposed in elevated relation to the respective inlet to said reservoir chamber from said retention chamber through said rows of slots so as to effect generally downward movement of fluid in said retention chamber from said inlet to said slots, said retention chambers having a fluid retaining capacity suflicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

12. In a gas separator for a submersible Well pump which separator includes, a generally cylindrical gas separator housing defining a reservoir chamber and adapted for disposition within a well in operative association with a submersed pump, means within the housing defining a passageway adapted to provide fluid communication between the reservoir chamber and the pump, means defining a plurality of circumferentially disposed longitudinally spaced apart rows of slots in said housing adapted to provide fluid communication between the well and the reservoir chamber; a plurality of longitudinally spaced apart retention cups disposed in surrounding relation to said separator housing, each of said retention cups being disposed in overlying relation to a row of said slots and including a generally cylindrical portion having 21 diameter greater than the diameter of the separator housing so as to form a retention chamber thereover, said retention cups being retained in spaced apart relation by at least one depending rib formed thereon and engaging the cylindrical portion of the next succeeding cup, the longitudinal spacing between successive cups providing inlets into said retention chambers adapted to initially receive fluid from the well, said retention chambers having a fluid retaining capacity suflicient to momentarily retain well fluid flowing from the well to the reservoir chamber so as to permit entrained gas to escape from the fluid so retained and return to the well.

13. A retention cup for a gas separator adapted to be disposed in surrounding relation to a cylindrical portion of a separator housing in overlying relation to an inlet opening formed therein so as to form a retention chamber thereover comprising, a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter larger than the diameter of the cylindrical portion of the separator housing, means defining an aperture within said cup coaxial with said cylindrical portion adapted to receive the cylindrical portion of the housing, a converging portion connecting said cylindrical portion and said aperture defining means.

14. A retention cup for a gas separator adapted to be disposed in surrounding relation to a cylindrical portion of a separator housing in overlying relation to an inlet opening formed therein so as to form a retention chamber thereover comprising, a generally cylindrical portion having a diameter larger than the diameter of the cylindrical portion of the separator housing, means defining an aperture Within said cup coaxial with said cylindrical portion adapted to receive the cylindrical portion of the housing, a converging portion connecting said cylindrical portion and said aperture defining means and 12 at least one depending rib formed on said converging portion disposed so as to engage the cylindrical portion of the next succeeding retention cup when positioned on the cylindrical portion of the separator housing so as to retain 5 said cups in spaced apart relation thereon.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS MARK NEWMAN, Primary Examiner.

HENRY F. RADUAZO, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2071393 *Mar 14, 1935Feb 23, 1937Harbauer CompanyGas separator
US2969742 *Jul 18, 1958Jan 31, 1961Reda Pump CompanyGas separator for submergible motorpump assemblies
US3175501 *Sep 24, 1963Mar 30, 1965Borg WarnerGas separator
DE543770C *Feb 19, 1927Feb 9, 1932Harry Sauveur Dipl IngVorrichtung zur Reinhaltung der Saugoeffnung von unter dem Fluessigkeitsspiegel arbeitenden Pumpen von Gas und Sand
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4241788 *Jan 31, 1979Dec 30, 1980Armco Inc.Multiple cup downwell gas separator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/105.5, 166/265, 415/169.1, 415/901, 415/58.4
International ClassificationF04D13/10, F04D9/00, E21B43/38
Cooperative ClassificationY10S415/901, F04D9/001, E21B43/38, F04D13/10
European ClassificationF04D13/10, F04D9/00B, E21B43/38
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 25, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: HUGHES TOOL COMPANY, P.O. BOX 2539, HOUSTON, TX. 7
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF A PART OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CEBTRILIFT-HUGHES INC.;REEL/FRAME:004123/0711
Effective date: 19821230