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Publication numberUS3291413 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1966
Filing dateDec 19, 1963
Priority dateDec 19, 1963
Publication numberUS 3291413 A, US 3291413A, US-A-3291413, US3291413 A, US3291413A
InventorsCushing Philip S, Stone Harris E
Original AssigneeCushing Philip S, Stone Harris E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cap for paper core
US 3291413 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 13, 1966 .P. s. cusl-uNe ETAL 3,291,413

CAP FOR PAPER CORE Filed Dec. 19, 1963 INVENTORS PHILIP s. cusmme BY HARRIS E. STONE ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 13, 1966 3,291,413 CAP FOR PAPER CORE Philip S. Cushing and Harris E. Stone, both of 293 Lenox St, Norwood, Mass. Filed Dec. 19, 1963, Ser. No. 331,860 2 Claims. (Cl. 24268.6)

This invention relates to a metal cap for tubular paper cores such as are used for rolls of newsprint and other kinds of paper, and to a method of making such caps. Newsprint for newspapers is customarily shipped in rolls weighing approximately a ton. These rolls are mounted in the printing presses which print the newspapers. For this purpose each roll is wound at the mill on a heavy tubular core of paper having a wall thickness of about /2 inch. The rolls are apt to be dropped or roughly handled in shipping, so to protect the ends of the cores from damage which would make it difficult to mount the roll, metal caps are provided on the ends of each paper core, each cap being made with a socket to receive a lug whereby the roll is keyed to the arbor or chuck to revolve therewith. As the cores are customarily shipped back to the paper mill for reuse, the caps serve to protect the ends of the cores for such reshipment. A considerable variety of caps for this purpose have been invented and patented. Those that have stood the test of time and are in actual use are rugged and expensive. It is an object of the present invention to provide a cap which is much less expensive to make but is satisfactory in use. It is a further object of the invention to provide a cap of sufficient strength that can be made so inexpensively that it can be a throw-away item. Since this will obviate the necessity of reshipment to the paper mill, the paper core itself can be made more cheaply so that it also can be a throw-away item, thus saving the cost and trouble of reshipment after use as well as the incidental damage that often occurs in the course of reshipment. I

As hereinafter described, the cap is made from a disk of sheet steel by drawing operations which result in a tubular cap and a reinforcing insert which fits tightly therein, the insert being cut from the cap after both have been simultaneously formed by the drawing operations.

For a more complete understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following description thereof, and to the drawing, of which FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the cap mounted on the end of a paper core;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view, on a larger scale, of a disk from which the cap and insert are made;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view of the cap and insert after the completion of the drawing operations but before the insert is cut from the cap;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view of an end portion of a paper core in which a cap and insert have been mounted; and

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view, on a reduced scale, of the cap.

The entire cup and the reinforcing insert are made from a single circular disk of sheet steel illustrated in FIG- URE 2. By cold draWing operations on the disk 10 a deep cup is formed as illustrated in FIGURE 3, this cup having an upper cylindrical tubular portion 12 with an outwardly extending socket element 14, a lower cylindrical portion 16 which has a diameter slightly less than that of the upper portion 12, and a flange 18 which extends radially outward from the rim of the tubular portion 12 and varies in width from zero extent at the socket 14 to a maximum at a point opposite to the socket 14. The lower portion 16 has an exterior diameter equal to the interior diameter of the upper portion 12 so that it can be fitted into the latter with a tight fit. The bottom 20 of the cup is punched to form a central hole 22, this hole as shown having a diameter of approximately /3 of the diameter of the cup itself. After the hole 22 has been formed, a die operates on the bottom 20 of the cup to emboss thereon a circular rib 24 which surrounds the hole 22 and stiffens the bottom of the cup. The lower portion 16 of the cup is then severed from the upper portion 12 at the lower end 26 of the latter to form a tubular member 12 and an insert 16, the latter having a slight flare 28 at its upper end or rim. In the drawing operation the tubular member 12 is shaped so that there is a radius 30 at the juncture of the tubular wall and the flange 18. The tubular member 12 is pressed into the end of a paper core 32 for a tight fit, the end of the core 32 having been notched to receive the socket element 14. The tubular member 12 may be secured in the end of the core 32 by any suitable means, such, for example, as spurs 34 which are struck outward by suitable tools after the member 12 has been fitted in the end of the core 32. To stiffen the end of the core and its cap for shipment, the insert 16 is forced into a tight fit within the tubular member 12. The flare 28 at the rim of the insert 16 nests in the radius 30 of the tubular member 12, the plane of the rim of the insert 16 being flush with the plane of the flange 18. The hole in the bottom of the insert 16 reduces the weight of the insert and also provides for the entrance of a tool which may be used to extract the insert 16 from the tubular member 12 just before the paper roll which is wound on the core 32 is to be mounted on an arbor or chucks.

We claim:

1. A cap for a paper core consisting of a metal tubular member having a body portion having an upper end, said upper end having a rim, said rim comprising an outward projecting socket element and a flange, said flange extending outward from said body portion and varying in extent from zero extent at each side of said socket element to a maximum extent at a point diametrically opposite to said socket element, the juncture between said flange and said body portion forming a smooth curved surface, and a cylindrical reinforcing insert closely fitted within said upper end of said body portion, said insert having an upper portion including a rim, the rim of said insert being flared and nestingly engaging said curved surface between said flange and said body portion, the plane of said insert rim being flush with the plane of said flange.

2. A cap for paper core comprising a metal tubular member having a body portion having an upper end, said upper end having a rim, said rim comprising an outward projecting socket element having a flange extending outward along the remainder of the rim, and a cylindrical reinforcing insert closely fitted within said upper end of said body portion, said insert having a bottom portion with a central hole of substantial diameter therein, the juncture between said flange and said body portion forming a smooth curved surface, said insert having an upper portion including a rim, the rim of said insert being flared and nestingly engaging said curved surface between said flange and said body portion, the plane of said insert rim being flush with the plane of said flange.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,687,586 10/1928 Parker 24268.6 1,802,694 4/1931 Bebie 24268.6 2,028,492 1/1936 Bebie 24268.6 2,196,378 4/1940 Bebie 24268.6

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

M. J. COLITZ, J. R. BOLER, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1687586 *Apr 16, 1927Oct 16, 1928Brown CoFiber core
US1802694 *Mar 1, 1929Apr 28, 1931Int Paper CoExtension core cap
US2028492 *Jul 25, 1934Jan 21, 1936Int Paper CoCore adapter
US2196378 *Apr 5, 1938Apr 9, 1940Int Paper CoCore plug
US2266494 *May 13, 1941Dec 16, 1941Int Paper CoCore cap
US2269939 *Aug 9, 1940Jan 13, 1942Badger Wood Plug CompanyCore plug
US2332175 *Jul 14, 1941Oct 19, 1943Kelsey Hayes Wheel CoMethod of forming brake drums
US2364953 *Aug 24, 1942Dec 12, 1944Int Paper CanadaCore cap
US2641826 *Jan 29, 1949Jun 16, 1953United Specialties CoMethod of forming filter housings
US3083928 *Nov 25, 1960Apr 2, 1963Badger Plug CompCore plug
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3774373 *Jan 28, 1972Nov 27, 1973Air Filter Co IncMandrel assembly for air filter apparatus
US4874139 *Oct 31, 1988Oct 17, 1989Daniel KewinTubular core assemblies for rolls of paper or other sheet material
US5236141 *Mar 25, 1992Aug 17, 1993Kewin Daniel DTubular core assemblies for rolls of paper or other sheet material
US5356093 *Jan 27, 1992Oct 18, 1994Kewin Daniel DTubular core assemblies for rolls of paper or other sheet material
US5595356 *Oct 12, 1995Jan 21, 1997Kewin; Daniel D.Tubular core assemblies for rolls of paper or other sheet material
US5725178 *Jan 3, 1997Mar 10, 1998927246 Ontario Inc.Tubular core assemblies for rolls of paper or other sheet material
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/611.2, 242/613.5
International ClassificationB65H75/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65H75/187
European ClassificationB65H75/18C2