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Publication numberUS3291529 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1966
Filing dateNov 4, 1965
Priority dateNov 4, 1965
Publication numberUS 3291529 A, US 3291529A, US-A-3291529, US3291529 A, US3291529A
InventorsStraits Ernest J
Original AssigneeStraits Ernest J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chair construction
US 3291529 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 13, 1966 E. J. STRAITS CHAIR CONSTRUCTION Filed Nov. 4, 1965 frzz/eiraiaw T: fimesi If WQZZZJT United States Patent 3,291,529 CHAIR CONSTRUCTION Ernest J. Straits, 712 S. 6th St., St. Charles, Ill. Filed Nov. 4, 1965, Ser. No. 506,316 4 Claims. (Cl. 297445) This invention relates to the art of chair construction and particularly to improvements in back construction for a chair.

To meet the requirements of institutional or meeting hall type usage, for storage purposes a stacking type of chair has become very popular and common. Such a stacking chair is ordinarily designed to be stacked one upon another with a large number of chairs in a single stack, but superimposed close to each other so that a minimum of space is employed.

In order to facilitate moving the chairs, a handle attached to the chair is also employed. It is one of the objects of this invention to provide a handle construction for such a chair which blends into the harmony of the chair construction and is recessed so that it is relatively protected from physical abuse to which the chairs are ordinarily subject.

Another important problem with stacking chairs is that the stacking and unstacking and excessive handling of the chairs creates a wear condition on the non-frame portions such as the upholstered portions which oftentimes damages the upholstery and generally minimizes its life. It is the principal object of this invention to provide a stacking chair which has a protective frame around the non-frame portions and which is of a novel construction permitting the framing construction to be economically manufactured, but still very effective for maximizing protection of the non-frame portions. Although the general construction covered by this invention might well be considered for the seat portion of a stacking chair, it lends itself especially to the back portion. It should be emphasized that the back portions of the stacking type chairs are subject to a sliding action as the chairs are stacked and the construction of this invention particularly minimizes the wear conditions created by this sliding action. Such a condition is not so extreme with the seat portions of a stacking chair because the stacking of the chairs does not create any particular sliding action between the seat portions which come directly into contact with each other without any appreciable sliding movement.

Other objects and advantages of the invention should become apparent upon reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows a three-quarter front perspective view of a chair embodying the preferred features of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation view of only the upper back portion of the chair shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view along the line 3--3 of FIG. 2 and particularly shows the upper rim construction of the seat back;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2 and particularly shows the lower rim portion of the seat back; and

FIG. 5 is a partial cut-away and sectional view of the lower corner of the back of the chair as shown in FIG. 2 and particularly shows the connection between the seat back and the framing portions for it.

As shown in FIG. 1, the chair 1 consists of an upper frame 2 which suitably supports a seat cushion 3 which may be fastened to it by means of screws or other suitable fasteners commonly employed. The frame 2 has two substantially vertical arms 2a and 2b which extend upwardly and frame the two sides of a back cushion 4.

The upper edge of the back cushion 4 is held in place by an upper channel member 5 which is connected at its ends 5a and 5b to the upper ends of the arms 2a and 2b of the upper frame 2. The lower edge of the back cushion is held in place by means of a channel member 6 which is secured at its ends 6a and 6b to lower portions of the arms 2a and 2b as is hereinafter described.

Welded or otherwise fastened to the edge regions of the lower portions of the frame 2 are two downwardly depending leg frames 7. Each of these leg frames 7 is provided with two legs 7a and 7b which form the depending portions of the frame members 7. These legs 7a and 7b are downwardly divergent and are arranged in such a manner that they will nest with legs of identical chairs positioned one upon the other. This nesting action between the chairs is further permitted by having the back frame 2 directed upwardly at a slight angle beyond the vertical.

As particularly shown in FIGS. 2 through 5, the upper channel member 5 has a mid-portion So which is recessed relative to the end portions 5a and 5b. This recessed portion 50 is connected by two intenmediate portions 5d and 5e which provide the connection between the recessed portion 50 and the ends 5a and 5b. A handle 8 is permanently secured at its ends to these portions 5d and 5e of the channel member 5. With this arrangement, the recessed portion 50 provides clearance so that the handle 8 can be gripped conveniently with portions of the hand extending between the handle 8 and the recessed portion 5c. At the same time, the handle 8 does not extend above the level of the ends 5a and 5b of the channel member 5 so that it is protected from snagging or engaging other objects as the chair is manipulated during stacking, unstacking and otherwise.

The back cushion 4 is shaped at its upper edge to conform to the shape of the channel member 5 and, as particularly shown in FIG. 5, the upper edge of the back cushion 4 is recessed within the channel member 5 where it is fully protected.

The side portions of the back cushion 4 are of the same shape as the arms 2a and 2b of the upper frame 2 so that they closely abut the arms 2a and 2b without any spacing.

The lower edge of the back cushion 4 fits into the lower channel member 6, as particularly indicated in FIG. 4. In this manner, the lower edge of the back cushion is well protected. This lower channel member 6 is secured at its ends 6a and 6b to the arms 2a and 2b of the upper frame 2 by means of two L-shaped clips 9. One leg 9d of each of the clips 9 is secured in a slightly recessed portion 9a in either of the arms 2a and 2b and welded in place. The dimensions of the recess and the clip are such that the surface 91) of the clip is flush with the inner edge 20 of each arm 2a or 2b. The clip 9 has its other leg extending substantially perpendicular to the leg 9d and it is positioned along the inner surface 60 of the channel member 6. Each leg 90 is provided with a tapped hole 9e which is aligned with a hole 6d and a screw 10 is provided through these holes to secure the channel member 6 to the clip 9. With the leg 90 concealed in the channel 6 and with its other leg 9d concealed within the recess 9a of each arm 2a and 2b, the clip is completely invisible when the chair is completely assembled. Another advantage is that the channel member 6 provides a rigid brace for the chair back and a very effective edge protection for the back cushion 4.

In order to provide clearance to permit placement of the back cushion 4 in the upper channel member 5, the clip legs 9c are initially bent downwardly as indicated by dotted lines in FIG. 5. After the back cushion 4 is positioned, the leg 9c is bent up to the position shown in solid outline for final assembly.

Although the back cushion 4, as indicated in FIGS. 3 and 4, is indicated as one having a padding material 4a and a rigid backing member 4b covered with a flexible cloth or plastic covering 40, other internal constructions are possible without deviating from the scope of the invention. It is significant, though, that the construction shown is very durable because the back cushion 4 is well protected by its framing members 2a, 2b, 5 and 6 which hold it securely in place and protect all of its edges. A feature which enhances protection of the edges is that the channel members 5 and 6 wrap around the edges of the back cushion and project from it by an amount equal to the thickness of the material from which the channel members are made. In this manner, any severe sliding contact of one chair over another occurs primarily along the edges of the channel members. Similarly, the arms 2a and 2b withstand severe sliding contact. Even though the main body of the back cushion 4 comes in contact with other objects, such as other chairs being stacked with it, the frame portions 2a, 2b, 5 and 6 ordinarily prevent undue compression and Wear of the back cushion 4.

Although only a single embodiment of the invention has been shown and described, it should be clearly understood that the invention can be manufactured in other ways without departing from the true scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims in which:

I claim:

1. A chair of a type having a frame, a seat portion attached to the frame with leg portions depending downwardly therefrom, and a back portion secured to the frame extending upwardly from the level of the seat portion, said back portion comprising, two upwardly extending spaced apart side arms with a seat back positioned therebetween, the upper edge of the seat back being fully confined within an upper channel which is connected between upper regions of said side arms, the lower edge of the seat back being fully confined within a lower channel connected between lower regions of the side arms.

2. A chair as defined by claim 1 characterized by, said lower channel being connected at each of its ends to a lower region of one of the side arms by means of a connector secured to the inside surface of the lower channel and to a recessed portion of the side arm so the connector is hidden from sight.

3. A chair as defined by claim 1 characterized by, said upper channel having a central recess provided with a handle therein which is located substantially within the confines of said recess, said lower channel being connected at each of its ends to a lower region of one of the side arms by means of a connector secured to the inside surface of the lower channel and to a recessed portion of the side arm so the connector is hidden from sight.

4. A chair of a type having a frame, a seat portion attached to the frame with leg portions depending downwardly therefrom, and a back portion secured to the frame extending upwardly from the level of the seat portion, said back portion comprising, two upwardly extending spaced apart side arms with a seat back positioned therebetween, the upper edge of the seat back being confined within an upper channel which is connected between upper regions of said side arms, the lower edge of the seat back being confined within a lower channel connected between lower regions of the side arms, said lower channel being connected at each of its ends to a lower region of one of the side arms by means of an L-shaped two legged connector secured by one of its legs to the inside surface of the lower channel and by the other of its legs to a recessed portion of the side arm so the connector is hidden from sight.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,284,957 6/1942 Gedris 297-460 X 2,333,073 10/1943 Mueller 297-450 X 2,783,828 3/1957 Weill 297-444 3,021,175 2/ 1962 Norquist 297-239 X 3,041,110 6/1962 King et al 297-451 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,065,343 5/1954 France. 599,600 11/1959 Italy.

FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner. CASMIR A. NUNBERG, Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No, 3,291,529 December 13, 1966 Ernest J. Straits It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

In the heading to the printed specification, line 3, for "Ernest J, Straits, 712 S. 6th St., St. Charles, I11."

read Ernest J, Straits, St. Charles, Ill. assignor to Interlake Steel Corporation, Chicago, Ill. a corporation of New York "a Signed and sealed this 26th day of September 1967.

(SEAL) Atbest:

ERNEST W. SW IDER EDWARD J. BRENNER Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2284957 *Jan 8, 1940Jun 2, 1942Ideal Seating CompanyTheater seat back
US2333073 *May 5, 1942Oct 26, 1943Mary D MuellerChair
US2783828 *Apr 4, 1955Mar 5, 1957Thonet Ind IncChair and detachable cushion therefor
US3021175 *Jun 2, 1958Feb 13, 1962Norquist Francis AFolding chairs
US3041110 *Sep 29, 1960Jun 26, 1962Shwayder Brothers IncStacking chair
FR1065343A * Title not available
IT599600B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3375040 *Jul 26, 1966Mar 26, 1968Hamilton Cosco IncChair backrest
US3380777 *Sep 8, 1966Apr 30, 1968Douglas M. BennettUpholstered furniture
US3431021 *Apr 5, 1967Mar 4, 1969Schlumberger LtdChair
US5248186 *Mar 27, 1992Sep 28, 1993Shelby Williams Industries, Inc.Bumper edge guard for upholstered seating furniture having a core member
US6612654 *Jan 4, 2002Sep 2, 2003Mity-Lite, Inc.Chair with upholstered inserts
US6805412Aug 30, 2002Oct 19, 2004Burgess Furniture Ltd.Stackable chair with flexible back
US7654617Feb 2, 2010Mity-Lite, Inc.Flexible chair seat
US7770968Aug 10, 2010Kerstin BartlmaeStackable chair
US8029059Oct 4, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Folding and stacking mesh chair system
US8033598Oct 11, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh folding chair
US8033612Oct 11, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Comfortable mesh folding chair
US8038221Apr 13, 2009Oct 18, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Folding mesh chair with nesting hoops
US8317269Nov 27, 2012Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh stacking chair
US8322787Dec 4, 2012Mity-Lite, Inc.Clamping joint for a chair
US8454093Jun 4, 2013Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh chair with open-end hoop
US9237809 *Oct 31, 2013Jan 19, 2016Paragon Furniture LPChair system
US20030047981 *Aug 30, 2002Mar 13, 2003Roth Peter SimonStackable chair with flexible back
US20080277982 *May 8, 2008Nov 13, 2008Kerstin BartlmaeStackable chair
US20140125093 *Oct 31, 2013May 8, 2014Richard KassanoffChair system
USD648554Nov 15, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh stacking chair
USD660612May 29, 2012Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh banquet chair
USD721529 *Jun 7, 2013Jan 27, 2015Steelcase Inc.Handle apparatus
EP0479046A1 *Sep 18, 1991Apr 8, 1992LOHMEYER, HartmutStackable seating furniture
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/448.1, 297/451.1, 297/183.7, 297/440.2, 297/452.57
International ClassificationA47C7/24, A47C3/00, A47C7/02, A47C3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C3/04, A47C7/24
European ClassificationA47C7/24, A47C3/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 6, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP INDUSTRIAL CREDIT, INC., 200 SOUTH WACKER
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BURD, INC.,;REEL/FRAME:003920/0195
Effective date: 19811001