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Publication numberUS3293694 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1966
Filing dateMar 12, 1965
Priority dateMar 5, 1962
Publication numberUS 3293694 A, US 3293694A, US-A-3293694, US3293694 A, US3293694A
InventorsJr Thomas G Taylor
Original AssigneeDayton Prec Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mold apparatus for making subflush commutators
US 3293694 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 27, 1966 TAYLOR, JR 3,293,694

MOLD APPARATUS FOR MAKING SUB-FLUSH COMMUTATORS Original Filed March 5, 1962 II JVEY\ITOR.

THOMAS G. TAYLOR, JR

0x :m J rap/121100 ATTORNEYS United States Pat nt v 3,293,694 MOLD APPARATUS FOR MAKING SUB- FLUSH COMMUTATORS Thomas G. Taylor, Jr., North Canton, Ohio, assignor to Dayton Precision Corporation, Dayton, hio, a corporation of Ohio I Original application Mar. 5, 1962, Ser. No. 177,387, now Patent No. 3,253,172, dated May 24, 1966. Divided and this application Mar. 12, 1965, Ser. No. 439,142 4 Claims. (CI. 18-36) This invention relates generally to commutators and more particularly to an improved apparatus for manufacturing a sub-flush commutator. This application is a division of my eopending application Serial No. 177,- 387, filed March 5, 1962, now Patent No. 3,253,172.

A commutator of the type to which this invention relates generally of an axial bushing, copper commutator segments which are arranged in a circular formation about the bushing, insulating members which are positioned between the copper segments, and an insulating core which is secured to and extends between the bushing and the commutator segments. In a sub-flush commutator, the insulating members are recessed, over at least major portions of their lengths, relative to the radially outer edges of the commutator segments so that the insulating members are below the surface of the commutator on which the commutator brushes ride. A sub-flush commutator is desirable in some instances because commutation is improved and a longer life of the commutator brushes is obtained. However, manufacture of sub-flush oommutators has heretofore been difficult to economically carry out because of the diificulty of maintaining an air gap between the copper segments at the outer edges of the insulating members, and the previous solutions to this problem involving internally finned molds and removable steel shims has been expensive and cumbersome. It is an object of this invention, therefore, to provide an improved apparatus for manufacturing a sub-flush commutator in which the insulating core is molded and in which air gaps are provided between adjacent pairs of copper segments over major portions of their lengths and insulation is provided between adjacent pairs of commutator segments at one of their ends so that the segments will not be moved into engagement when the armature wires are staked into the segments.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved apparatus for forming a sub-flush commutator in which the insulating core is molded and the insulating material from which the core is formed is positively prevented from filling the desired air gaps between the commutator segments.

In the manufacture of sub-flush commutators according to the apparatus of this invention, the copper segments and the mica insulating members, which are recessed at their outer edges, are arranged in a circular formation about an inwardly spaced axial bushing so that the recessed outer edges of the mica members form air gaps between the copper segments. Each air gap extends from one end of each segment to a position spaced from but adjacent the opposite end of the segment. The space between the radially inner edges of the segments and insulating members and the bushing is then tilled with a hardenable insulating material concurrently with squeezing the segments and members adjacent opposite ends of the air gaps so as to positively prevent flow of insulating material into the air gaps. This sealing off of the air gaps is obtained by providing a squeeze ring which squeezes the segments and insulating members adjacent one end of each air gap and a knife edge shutoff ring which is formed in the mold so as to be in sealing engagement with the segments and members adjacent the opposite ends of the air gaps. An improved molded Patented Dec. 27, 1966 sub-flush commutator is thus obtainable with the ap arag tus of this invention and each commutator is provided with unrestricted air gaps between adjacent pairs of copper segments.

Further objects, features and advantages of this invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following description, the appended claims, and the accompanying drawing in which:

FIGURE lis a transverse sectional view of a sub-flush commutator manufactured with the apparatus of this invention showing a copper segment on one side of the commutator and an insulating member on the opposite side of the commutator;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view of the commutator looking substantially along the line 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIGURE 3 is a vertical sectional view of the lower portion of the apparatus used in manufacturing the commutator of this invention, showing the commutator bushing, segments and insulating members as they are initially assembled in the apparatus;

FIGURE 4 is a vertical sectional view of the commutator manufacturing apparatus of this invention showing a completed commutator formed therein;

FIGURE 5 is a vertical sectional view of the commutator manufacturing apparatus of this invention, illustrated similarly to FIG. 4, showing the top half of the apparatus removed and with the completed commutator in a posit-ion ejected from the apparatus; and

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view of a portion of the commutator manufacturing apparatus of this invention, looking substantially along the line 66 in FIG. 4.

With reference to the drawing, a commutator made with the apparatus of the invention, indicated generally at 10, is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 as including an axial bushing 12, which may be formed of brass or other suitable metal, commutator segments 14, which are usually formed of copper, insulating segments or members 16 which are formed of mica or other suitable nan-conducting material and are positioned between the commutator segments 14 so as to insulate the segments 14 from each other, and a molded core 18 of a hardenable plas tic material, such as a phenolic or equivalent plastic material. Each of the commutator segments 14 is of a generally trapezoidal shape in cross section, as shown in FIG. 2, and has an outer edge surface 20 which is substantially parallel to the bushing 12. Each segment 14 is also shaped so that it has a pair of ends 22 and 24, which are hereinafter referred to as the upper and lower ends merely for convenience of description, and a radially inner edge 26 which is provided with a substantially dovetail projection 28. Each of the insulating members 16 is of a generally flat form, and, in longitudinal section, is of generally the same size and shape as a commutator segment 14, as shown in FIG. 1. Each insulating member 16 has a radially inner side 30 which is provided with a substantially dovetail shape projection 32and opposite ends 34 and 36 which are likewise referred tohereinafter as the upper and lower ends, respectively, for convenience of description.

Adjacent its upper end 34, each commutator insulating member 16 is of a width corresponding substantially to the width of-a commutator segment 14 so that it has an outer edge 38 which is spaced substantially thesame distance from the projection 32 as the edge 20 is spaced from the projection 28 on a segment 14. Between the edge 38 and the lower end 36, the insulating member 16 is formed with a longitudinally extending recess or cutout 40 which extends over a major portion of the length of the member 16. The recess 40 extends the full thickness of each insulating member 16 and extends through the end 36 thereof 'but is spaced from the end 34 for a purpose to appear presently.

The insulating core 18 has the dovetail projections 28 and 32 embedded therein so that the projections 28 and 32 are spaced radially outwardly of the bushing 12 so that they are insulated from the bushing 12. The core 18 is also formed so that it is of a length to extend axially beyond the ends of the segments 14 and the members 16 to thereby additionally strengthen the support of the segments 14 and members 16 on the bushing 12.

The apparatus for manufacturing the commutator 10, indicated generally at 42, is shown in FIGS. 3 to 6, inclusive, as including upper and lower mold members 44 and 46, respectively. The lower mold member 46 has an opening 48 extended substantially axially therethrough and a tubular ejector sleeve 50 is slidably positioned therein. A stationary core pin 52 is positioned in the sleeve 50 and is formed at its upper end with a reduced diameter portion 54 and a horizontal shoulder 56 at the lower end of the reduced portion 54. The lower mold member 46 is formed with an upwardly opening cylindrical cavity 56 which surrounds the pin portion 54, and the lower end of the cavity 56 communicates with a recess 58 which is of a reduced diameter and is of a shape corresponding to the shape of one end of the insulating core 18. Radially outwardly of the recess 58, the lower mold member 46 is formed with an upwardly projecting shutoff ring 60, which is in the'form of a knife edge projection. A steel squeeze ring 62, which is of a predetermined length and diameter, and has an inner surface 64 which is of a diameter corresponding precisely to the desired diameter of the commutator 10, is positioned in the cavity 56 so that it engages the cavity wall 66 and is positioned radially outwardly of the shutoff ring 60.

The top mold member 44 has an axial passage 68 formed therein and in its lower end 70 is formed with a recess 72, which is of the shape desired for one end of the commutator core 18 and communicates with the passage 68. Radially extending vent passages 74 extend between the recess 72 and the outer edge 76 of the upper mold member 44. The passages 74 are illustrated as being four in number, but it is to be understood that the number of passages 74 is dependent upon the viscosity of the material from which the core 18 is molded and may be more or less than four.

In the use of the apparatus 42 to form the commutator 10, the bushing 12 is initially positioned about the pin portion 54 so that it is supported on the shoulder 56 which is located at the lower end of the recess 58 (FIG. 3). In the event a bushingless commutator is to be made with the apparatus of this invention, the installation of a bushing 12 on the pin portion 54 is eliminated. The squeeze ring 62 is positioned in the lower mold cavity 56 and the segments 14 and members 16 are arranged in an alternating relation and in a circular formation or assembly, as shown in FIG. 2, within the squeeze ring 62. By virtue of the trapezoidal shape of the segments 14, the circular formation of a predtermined diameter corresponding to the inner diameter of the squeeze ring 62 is readily obtained, without any tendency of the segments 14 and the members 16 to move radially inwardly of the squeeze ring 62. The engagement of the outer edges 20 and 38 of the segments 14 and members 16, respectively, with the inner surface 64 of the squeeze ring 62 prevents movement of the segments 14 and members 16 radially outwardly of the desired positions.

The segments 14 and members 16 are initially supported on the shutoff ring 60, as shown in FIG. 3, so that they project substantially above the squeeze ring 62. The upper mold member 44 is then moved downwardly so that its lower end 70 engages the upper ends 22 and 34, respectively, of the segments 14 and members 16. Pressure is applied to the upper mold member 44 so as to force the segments 14 and members 16 downwardly on the knife edge shutoff ring 60 so that the shutoff ring 60 bites into the lower ends 24 and 36, respectively, of

the segments 14 and members 16, as shown in FIG. 4. The length of the squeeze ring 62 is slightly less than the length of the segments 14 and members 16 so that the squeeze ring 62 does not interfere with the continued application of pressure to the segments 14 and members 16 by the upper mold member 44, as shown in FIG. 4.

With the parts of the apparatus 42 and the parts of the commutator 10 positioned as shown in FIG. 4, the insulating material of which the core 18 is to be formed is injected through the passage 68 into the irregularly shaped cavity 78 formed by the mold recesses 58 and 72 and the space between the segments 14 and 16 and the bushing 12. As shown in FIG. 4, by virtue of the recess 40 formed in the insulating members 16, an air gap or space is formed between each adjacent pair of commutator segments 14. The space 80 extends over the major portion of the length of each insulating member 16 between the lower end 36 thereof and a position spaced from and adjacent the upper end 34 thereof.

The projection of the knife edge shutoff ring 60 into the lower ends of the segments 14 and members 16 provides an effective seal to positively prevent any flow of the insulating material from the cavity 78 into the lower ends of the air gaps 80. The upper ends of the air gaps 80 are effectively sealed from the cavity 78 by the tight engagement of the outer edges 20 and 38 of the segments 14 and the members 16 with the inner surface 64 of the squeeze ring 62. The pressure of the insulating material in the cavity 78 additionally effects a tight engagement of the edges 20 and 38 with the inner surface of the squeeze ring 62. The vent passages 74 provide for a radially outward flow of any insulating material which might otherwise tend to enter the upper ends of the air- Following hardening of the insulating material in the cavity 78, so as to form the core 18, the completed commutator is removed from the apparatus 42 by first removing the upper mold member 44. The ejector sleeve 50 is then moved upwardly relative to the stationary pin 52 so as to move the commutator 10 with the squeeze ring 62 thereon out of the lower mold 46. After final hardening and any heat treating operations which may be desirable, the squeeze ring 62 is removed from the commutator 10.

From the above description it is seen that this invention provides a mica molded commutator in which an air gap 80 is provided between each pair of adjacent commutator segments 14. The configuration of the insulating members 16 so that they project outwardly, adjacent the ends 22 of the segments 14, distances sufficient to position their outer edges 38 such that they are flush with the outer edges 20 of the segments 14 is advantageous because the insulating members 16 then prevent the segments from being deformed into engagement when the armature wires are staked into the segments 14 adjacent their ends 22. By virtue of the provision of the squeeze ring 62 and the shutoff ring 60 the air gaps 80, which are desirable in a sub-flush commutator, are maintained free of restrictions during manufacture of the commutator 10. The cavity 78 is shaped so that the core 18 extends axially beyond the ends of the segments 14 to thereby provide increased support for the segments 14 on the bushing 12 to prevent accidental separation of the segments 14 from the bushing 12.

It will be understood that the sub-flush commutator and method and apparatus for manufacturing sub-flush commutators which are herein disclosed and described are presented for purposes of explanation and illustration and are not intended to indicate limits of the invention, the scope of which is defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for manufacturing a sub-flush commutator comprising a mold assembly which includes a lower mold member and an upper mold member, said lower mold member having a cavity in the top side thereof, a squeeze ring positioned in said cavity and having an internal diameter corresponding to the desired diameter of said commutator, an upwardly projecting shutoff ring formed integral with said lower mold member and projected upwardly into said cavity at a position radially inwardly of said squeeze ring, said upper mold member having its lower end positioned above said cavity and having passage means for mold material therein which communicates wtih said cavity.

2. Apparatus for manufacturing a sub-flush commutator which includes commutator segments, insulating members positioned between said segments, and an insulating core connected to said segments and members, said apparatus comprising a mold assembly including a lower mold member and an upper mold member, said lower mold member having a cavity in the top side thereof, a squeeze ring positioned in said cavity and having an internal diameter corresponding to the desired diameter of said commutator, an upwardly projecting shutoff ring formed integral with said lower mold member and projected upwardly into said cavity at a position radially inwardly of said squeeze ring for sealing engagement with the lower ends of said segments and members when they are arranged in a circular formation in said squeeze ring, said upper mold member having its lower end posi tioned above said cavity and having passage means for mold material therein which communicates with said cavity at a position within said squeeze ring.

3. Apparatus for manufacturing a sub-flush commutator Which includes commutator segments, members positioned between said segments, and an insulating core connected to and extending radially inwardly of said segments and members, said apparatus comprising a mold assembly including a lower mold member and an upper mold member, said lower mold member having a cavity in the top side thereof, a squeeze ring positioned in said cavity and having an internal diameter corresponding to the desired diameter of said commutator, an upwardly projecting knife edge shutofi ring formed integral with said lower mold member and projected upwardly into said cavity at a position radially inwardly of said squeeze ring for sealing engagement with the lower ends of said segments and members when they are arranged in acircular formation in said squeeze ring, pin means projecting axially upwardly within said cavity, and a vertically movable ejector sleeve positioned about said pin means, said upper mold member having its lower end positioned above said cavity and having passage means for mold material therein which communicates with said cavity at a position within said squeeze ring.

insulating 4. Apparatus for manufacturing a sub-flush commutator which includes commutator segments, insulating members positioned between said segments, and an insulating core connected to and extending radially inwardly of said segments and members, said apparatus comprising a mold assembly including a lower mold member and an upper mold member, said lower mold member having a cavity in the top side thereof and an axial recess which communicates with the lower end of said cavity, a squeeze ring positioned in said cavity and having an internal diameter corresponding to the desired diameter of said commutator, an upwardly projecting knife edge shutoff ring formed integral with said lower mold member and projected upwardly into said cavity at a position radially inwardly of said squeeze ring for sealing engagement with the lower ends of said segments and members when they are arranged in a circular formation in said squeeze ring, pin means projecting axially upwardly within said cavity to a position above said segments, and a vertically movable ejector sleeve positioned about said pin means, said upper mold member having its lower end supported on said segment and members so as to maintain them in engagement with said shutoff ring and having passage means for mold material therein, said upper mold member having a recess in the lower end thereof which communicates with said passage means and radially outwardly extending vent passages which communicate with said recess, whereby hardenable insulating material is injectable into said passage means for flow into said cavity so as to form said core so that it extends beyond the ends of said segments and members.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,284,362 11/1918 Kempton.

1,592,939 7/1926 Kanaky 249-84 X 1,639,456 8/1927 Johnson 249 X 1,928,325 9/1933 Apple 18-36 1,932,391 10/1933 Apple.

1,944,869 1/1934 Apple 18-36 X 2,019,064 10/ 1935 Apple.

2,304,984 12/1942 Wood 18-36 X 2,559,860 7/1951 Fay 18-36 2,559,861 7/1951 Fay 18-36 2,724,864 11/1955 Krotz 24983 X 2,810,929 10/1957 Willi 1816.7 2,864,157 11/1958 Camprubi 29-15554 2,887,764 5/1959 Knoll et al. 29-15554 3,074,112 1/1963 Bobrow 18-36 3,077,003 2/ 1963 Hobson 18-36 J. SPENCER OVERHOLSER, Primary Examiner.

WHITMORE A. WILTZ, J. HOWARD FLINT, JR.,

Examiners.

R. W. CHURCH, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3543337 *Aug 14, 1968Dec 1, 1970Microdot IncApparatus for manufacturing insulators for multiple conductor connectors
US3778017 *Dec 13, 1971Dec 11, 1973Cebal GpApparatus for joint manufacture
US3864821 *Jan 24, 1973Feb 11, 1975Nippon Denso CoMethod of making a commutator
US4111623 *Sep 16, 1976Sep 5, 1978Pemco-Kalamazoo, Inc.Apparatus for assembling bearing unit in a wheel
US4167379 *Nov 2, 1977Sep 11, 1979American Antenna CorporationInjection mold
US4362489 *May 18, 1981Dec 7, 1982Bethlehem Steel CorporationExpandable mandrel apparatus for manufacturing smooth-lined corrugated pipe
US4386755 *Jan 29, 1982Jun 7, 1983Teleflex IncorporatedMold for remote control assembly (vibration dampening)
US4439913 *May 8, 1981Apr 3, 1984Mavilor SystemesMethod and means for manufacturing frontal commutators of electric motors, more particularly of the type having an insulation between the commutator bars
US4600372 *Aug 20, 1985Jul 15, 1986Victor BarouhPositioning system for molding plastic drive gear
US4631809 *Apr 9, 1984Dec 30, 1986Sanmeidenki KabushikikaishaProcess for manufacture cores of electromagnet
US4786027 *Feb 17, 1987Nov 22, 1988Motor Wheel CorporationApparatus for molding composite metal-elastomer wheels
US4861538 *May 19, 1988Aug 29, 1989Motor Wheel CorporationMethod for molding composite metal-elastomer wheels
US4963083 *Dec 16, 1988Oct 16, 1990Motor Wheel CorporationComposite metal-elastomer styled wheels and method and apparatus for molding the same
US6702562 *Feb 6, 2002Mar 9, 2004Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Apparatus for manufacturing bead inductor
US7955546 *Dec 29, 2009Jun 7, 2011Ngk Insulators, Ltd.Forming die and method for manufacturing formed body using forming die
WO2004038905A2 *Oct 27, 2003May 6, 2004Kolektor D O OCommutator for an electrical machine and method for producing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/123, 425/444, 29/597, 425/812, 249/84, 425/129.1, 249/85, 425/542
International ClassificationH01R43/06
Cooperative ClassificationY10S425/812, H01R43/06
European ClassificationH01R43/06