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Publication numberUS3293808 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1966
Filing dateJul 13, 1964
Priority dateJul 13, 1964
Publication numberUS 3293808 A, US 3293808A, US-A-3293808, US3293808 A, US3293808A
InventorsDuncan Joseph R
Original AssigneeDuncan Joseph R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prefabricated cornice for roof construction
US 3293808 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 27, 1966 J. R. DUNCAN 3,293,808

PREFABRIGATED CORNICE FOR ROOF CONSTRUCTION Filed July 13, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet l FIG I 56 I. 58 6 K2] 2e 1 j:

/'52 24 50 FIG. 2 6O Dec. 27, 1966 J. R. DUNCAN 3,293,808

PREFABRICATED CORNICE FOR ROOF CONSTRUCTION Filed July 15, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 4

JOSEPH R. DUNCAN INVENTOR.

United States Patent 3,293,808 PREFABRICATED CORNICE FOR ROOF CONSTRUCTION Joseph R. Duncan, P.0. Box 693, Abilene, Tex. 79604 Filed July 13, 1964, Ser. No. 382,243 8 Claims. (Cl. 52-92) This invention relates to building structures and more particularly to a cornice.

In the construction of wood frame buildings such as residences, etc. the cornice installation is a slow, time consuming task.

An object of this invention is to provide a block for the installation of cornices.

Another object is to provide such a block wherein the crooked rafters are readily straightened and smooth, even cornices are quickly installed.

A further object is to provide a block for installing cornices on brick veneer buildings also providing for the brick pocket, i.e. a facer board over the top of the brick.

Still further objects are to achieve the above with a device that is sturdy, compact, durable, simple, and reliable yet inexpensive and easy to manufacture and install.

The specific nature of the invention as well as other objects, uses, and advantages thereof will clearly appear from the following description and from the accompanying drawing, the different views of which are not necessarily to the same scale, in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of a building illustrating an embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of a building illustrating a second embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the block shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a schematic representation of the frame of a building utilizing this invention with parts broken away and in section for better illustration of the invention.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 1, there is represented a frame building with a brick veneer 10. The structure includes wall studs 12 which form a portion of the wood frame of the walls and the studs have wall plate 14 on top thereof. Insulating board 16 is attached to the outside of the wall studs 12. The roof frame 18 (seen in full in FIG. 4) includes ridge pole 19, wood rafters 20, and tie beams 21.

This invention is particularly concerned with block 22 (FIGS. 1 and 3) by which the cornice comprising the soffit 24, facia 26, and facer board 28, are applied.

The block 22 includes the horizontal soffit support 30 which is beveled on its outer edge at 31 to fit the rafter 20. The horizontal soflit support 30 is attached by two first scabs 32 to vertical wall member 34. The vertical wall member 34 has notch 36 therein to fit over stringer 38 as will be explained later. Two second scabs 40 on either side of the block 22 attach to the sofiit support 30 to the rafters. Two third scabs 42 are attached to the vertical Wall member 34 and extend upward therefrom and are stapled to the rafter 20. The scabs are made of plywood and attached by stapling.

In describing the use of the block 22 for cornicing the structure, first, the stringer 38 is attached to the wall frames on the outside of the insulating board 16. As may be seen more particularly in FIG. 4, some of the rafters are not aligned with studs 12 and therefore, the block 22 will be attached only to the rafter and the attachment of the toenailing into the stringer 38. Any crooked rafters are cut partially through as at 44. This permits the rafter end to be aligned by the block 22. Then the vertical members 34 are beveled at top and the top fits about one half inch below the rafter to compensate for irregularities. The cornice blocks 22 are attached to "ice the rafters 20 by stapling through the scabs 40 and 42. After the blocks are attached, the sofiit 24 is attached to the underside of the sofiit support 30 and the facia 26 is attached to the end of the rafters 20. The facia 26 has a longitudinal notch and the sofi'lt 24 fits within the notch of the facia. After the soflit is attached, the facer board 28 is attached to one face of the vertical wall member 34 forming the brick pocket. The facer board is attached after the sofiit and therefore, the facer board butts against one edge of the soffit to hold it securely in place. It may be seen that there is a brick pocket formed behind the facer board 28 so that the brick 10 may be laid up behind the facer board.

Also it may be seen that the block 22 is adaptable for forming cornices on eyebrow eaves 45, i.e. eaves that are formed upon a gable at a level even with the eaves formed at the side of the structure. Such an application is shown of the right hand side of FIG. 4. A false rafter 46 is scabbed to the side of the gable studs by means of the block 22, facia 26, and sofiit 24 and facer board 28 attached to this as though it were a regular eave.

Referring more particularly to the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, it may be seen there is also provided a block 50 adaptable for a frame house which has siding thereon. In this case, the soflit support 52 is attached to the vertical wall member 54 by two first scabs 56 which also extend upward forming a scab to attach the block to the rafter 22. Two second scabs 58 on each side of the block 50 attach the soffit support 52 to the rafter 20.

The installation of the block 50 is quite similar to the installation of the block 22; i.e. after the rafters 20 have been attached, the blocks 50 are attached to the rafters by stapling and the soffit 24 and facia 26 installed. In this case, the top siding member 60 butts against the edge of the sofiit 24 to finish the installation.

Of course, it will be understood that FIG. 3 illustrates a block which would be sold as a separate item in commerce and which would be prepared at a central shop and sent to the job to be installed as a unit. Therefore, it may be seen that I have provided a particularly quick and simple method to attach cornices which will be smooth, even, and sturdy.

The top of the notch 36 is on a level line with the bottom of the soflit support 30. Therefore a chalk line may be made on the insulation 16 which is level with the tail end of the rafter 20. Then the stringer 38 is attached with its top level with the chalk line. Therefore attachment of the block 22 with the notch 36 on the stringer 38 will result in a smooth even cornice.

It will be apparent that the embodiments shown are only exemplary and that various modifications can be made in construction, materials, and arrangement within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a building structure having (a) walls,

(b) a roof frame on the walls with (c) wood rafters which ((1) extend over the walls to form eaves, and

(e) a facia attached to the ends of the rafters; the improved cornice comprising in combination:

(f) a plurality of composite blocks, each having (i) a vertical Wall member and (ii) a horizontal soffit support,

(iii) at least one first scab attaching the vertical wall member and horizontal soffit support together,

(iv) at least one second scab attaching the horizontal sofiit support to the cave portion of one of the rafters,

(g) one of said composite blocks so attached to each rafter, and

(h) a soffit attached to the underside of the sofiit supports. T

2. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein (i) said soffit is fitted Within a horizontal notch in the facia.

3. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein (i) said first scab also extends upward and is also (k) the lower portion of the vertical wall member extends below the bottom of the soflit and (m) a facer board is attached to the lower portion of the vertical wall member, thus forming a brick to the stringer; (in) said soflit attached to the underside of the soflit support, and

the improvement comprising:

(h) a composite block attached to each rafter having (i) a horizontal sofiit support, (ii) a vertical wall member,

attached to the eave portion of one of the rafters. (iii) first scabs on each side of the block attach- 4. The invention as defined in claim 1 with the addiing the sofiit support to the wall member and tion of the block to the eave portion of said rafter, and

(j) at least one third scab attaching the vertical wall (iv) second scabs on each side of the block atmember to the eave portion of the rafter. taching the sofiit support to the cave portion 5. The invention as defined in claim 4 wherein of said rafter; and

(j) said soffit attached to the underside of the soffit support. 8. A composite block adapted to form a cornice on a brick veneered, wood framed building comprising:

pocket. (a) a horizontal soffit support, 6. In a building structure having (b) a vertical wall member, (a) wood frame walls, (c) first scabs on each side of the block attaching the (b) a brick veneer over the Walls, soflit support to the wall members, (0) aroof frame on the walls with (d) second scabs on each side of the block attached ((1) wood rafters which to the sofiit support and adapted to attach the sofiit (e) extend over the walls to form eaves, support to the eave portion of rafters, (f) a facia attached to the ends of the rafters, (e) third scabs on each side of the block attached to (g) a soflit, and the wall member adapted to attach the wall member (h) a facer board extending from the soffit to below to the eave portion of a rafter,v

the top of the brick; (f) a notch in the vertical wall member adapted to the improvement comprising: be fitted over a stringer attached to a wall frame,

(j) a stringer attached to the wood frame Walls above (g) the underside of the sofiit support adapted to have the brick veneer and below the rafters, a soffit attached thereto, and (k) a composite block attached to each rafter having (h) a face of the vertical wall member adapted to have (i) a horizontal soflit support, a facer board attached thereto. (ii) a vertical wall member, (iii) first scabs on each side of the block attacheferences Cited by the Examiner ing the soffit sllalpport t0 the wall member, k UNITED STATES PATENTS (iv) second sca s on each side of the bloc at- 2,300,113 10/1942 Faber 52-93 soflit the eave 2,542,151 2/1951 McAulifie 52 93 (v) third scabs on each side of the block attach- 9/1958 Lechalre 52 94 X ing the wall member to the eave portion of FOREIGN PATENTS the rafter, (vi) a notch in the vertical wall member fitted 67375 1/1914 Switzerland OTHER REFERENCES House and Home, December 1958, pages 108, 109.

(u) said facer board attached to the wall member. 7. In a building structure having (a) wood frame walls,

(b) siding on said walls,

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

RICHARD W. COOKE, JR., Examiner.

M. O. WARNECKE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2300113 *Apr 1, 1939Oct 27, 1942Faber Herbert ABuilding construction
US2542151 *Jun 6, 1947Feb 20, 1951Mcauliffe Jr John HBuilding construction
US2849966 *May 11, 1954Sep 2, 1958Alexis LechaireRoofing timber-work
CH67375A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3527003 *Apr 8, 1968Sep 8, 1970Woodard Sherman ARoof construction and cornice strip therefor
US3999338 *Sep 18, 1975Dec 28, 1976Hill-Behan Lumber CompanyRoof framework employing slotted gable construction
US4503647 *Jan 27, 1983Mar 12, 1985Gerhard PostStructural building elements for construction of simulated log houses
US4573293 *Jan 23, 1984Mar 4, 1986Heartland Industries, Inc.Building structure
US4850174 *Sep 8, 1987Jul 25, 1989Valente Daniel JModular roof system
US5224308 *Aug 26, 1991Jul 6, 1993Uniframes Holdings Pty LimitedEave and fascia
US5311708 *May 21, 1993May 17, 1994Frye Filmore OAnchor system for completed structures
US5335462 *Jan 14, 1993Aug 9, 1994Heartland Industries, Inc.Building structure
US5355640 *Jan 4, 1994Oct 18, 1994Frye Filmore OAnchor system for completed structures
US5388378 *Jan 4, 1994Feb 14, 1995Frye; Filmore O.Anchor system for completed structures
US5561949 *Oct 7, 1994Oct 8, 1996Universal Forest Products, Inc.Tie-down strap for building truss
US5735087 *Jul 19, 1996Apr 7, 1998Mitek Holdings, Inc.Truss with integral hold down strap
US6035586 *Sep 29, 1998Mar 14, 2000International Building Concepts, Ltd.Organic rafter having slideable rafter tail
US8156692 *Feb 6, 2008Apr 17, 2012Tuff Shed, Inc.Endwall overhang
US8161709 *Aug 11, 2009Apr 24, 2012Tuff Shed, Inc.Method of making an endwall overhang
US8176690 *Jul 12, 2010May 15, 2012Newman StanleyHigh-strength structure
US8528268 *Dec 2, 2010Sep 10, 2013Component Manufacturing CompanyTrilateral bracing structure for reinforcing a building frame structure
US8656681 *Aug 20, 2013Feb 25, 2014Anthony M. IannelliMethod for securing a panel over a gap in an exterior portion of a building
US8732872 *Sep 5, 2012May 27, 2014J-Gable, LlcGable overhang structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/92.2, 52/94
International ClassificationE04B7/02, E04D13/158, E04D13/15
Cooperative ClassificationE04D13/158, E04B7/02
European ClassificationE04D13/158, E04B7/02