Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3294092 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1966
Filing dateSep 13, 1965
Priority dateSep 13, 1965
Publication numberUS 3294092 A, US 3294092A, US-A-3294092, US3294092 A, US3294092A
InventorsFred S Landauer
Original AssigneeFred S Landauer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Therapeutic apparatus
US 3294092 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 27, 1966 F. S. LANDAUER THERAPEUTIC APPARATUS Filed Sept. 15, 1965 urg/ng 0.6. Interrupted Continuous A. 6. Continuous A. 6 Surging A6. Interrupted 26 0.6. Generator Selector A6. Generator IN VEN TOR.

a T 1 Continuous A6.

Ll L L U o H H Interrupted/1.6.

Ull U 4 Cycle 1 1 0.6. lnterru ted 2i 06. Continuous Surging and Interrupted A6.

L- Cycle I FRED S. LANDAUER 0.6.-$urglng BY M a Cycte A T TORNE X United States Patent $294,092 THERAPEUTIC APPARATUS Fred S. Landauer, 11 Blenheim Court, Rockville Centre, N.Y. 11570 Filed Sept. 13, 1965, Ser. No. 486,656 3 Claims. '(Cl. 128-420) This is a continuation-in-part of application Serial No. 284,222, filed May 29, 1963, and now abandoned. This invention relates to a therapeutic apparatus for producing multiple vibrations especially useful in physiotherapy.

It has long been known that the application of signals which cause therapeutic vibrations in selected portions of the body as muscles, will result in rapid stimulation of such muscles as to induce the healing and recovery of damage to the body. It has been found that by the application of vibrations producing signals having certain desired characteristics, the body muscles will be rapidly stimulated to overcome or counteract atrophy and sometimes defects due to poor nutrition. Muscle stimulation has been known to aid in removing eXudates and minimizing the formation of adhesions. In the past, such therapeutic vibrations have been generated by multi-current electrical generators of the type disclosed in the United States Letters Patent to Fischer et -al., No. 2,004,- 751, by which characteristically different currents can be produced and the vibrations producing signals thereof applied to the body during physiotherapy treatment.

However, in practice, it has been found that the mere application to the body of a vibration or electric current is insufficient to accomplish the desired therapeutic result. When treated with a single vibration or current for too long, the treated muscles tend to fatigue rapidly, the patient tires and the treatment is sometimes ineffectual. Moreover, the therapist often finds it damaging to apply a vibration or current of maximum intensity too early to the patient, but rather, must first introduce the patient slowly to a particular vibration or current characteristic and then gradually incease the intensity of that vibration or current.

The desideratum of this invention is to provide a therapeutic apparatus that is capable of producing a plurality of vibrations or currents each having a different desired characteristic; and an apparatus in which certain desired vibrations or currents may be selectively scheduled within a single cycle of operation and then cyclically repeated for treatment and application to the desired part or parts of the body. In this way, the treated muscle or muscles do not have the opportunity to become acclimated to any one vibration or current characteristic and because each therapeutic vibration or current is of a different characteristic during each repeated cyclic application to the body, the intensity of the vibrations or currents applied to the body at the beginning of the treatment may be materially greater than heretofore.

Another object of the invention is to provide a therapeutic apparatus in which each of the plurality of characteristically different vibrations or currents produced thereby may be applied separately to the body and the intensity thereof selectively controlled.

In carrying out the objects of the invention, a feature thereof resides in the novel arrangement of structure that enables the production of electrical currents and signals each of a different characteristic and direct application or .the conversion thereof to a therapeutic vibration of a corresponding desired characteristic that is adapted to be applied to desired portions of the body.

Other and further objects of this invention reside in the structures and arrangements hereinafter more fully described with reference to the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic illustration of a therapeutic apparatus according to the teaching of the invention,

FIG. 2 schematically shows a form of the apparatus embodying a principle of the invention, and

FIG. 3 is a series of diagrams of wave forms of different characteristics each capable of being produced by the apparatus.

Referring now to the drawing and in particular to FIG. l thereof, the therapeutic apparatus there shown is generally identified by the numeral 10. The apparatus 10 is adapted to produce vibrations either by mechanical means or -'by the conversion of electrical currents to vibrations in the body. The diagrammatic illustration of FIG. 1 teaches the use of a plurality of mechanisms each of which is adapted to produce a vibration having a characteristic that is different from the others.

In FIG. 1, there is shown a device 12 for producing a vibration simulating the form of an interrupted direct current such as that shown at d in FIG. 3. The mechanism 14 is adapted to produce a wave form simulating that of a continuous dire-ct current as shown at e in FIG. 3. The mechanism 11 is adapted to produce a wave form simulating that of a surging direct current as shown at g in FIG. 3. Each of the mechanisms 16, 18 and 20 is adapted to produce wave forms such as that shown at a, b and 0 respectively of FIG. 3. Thus, the mechanism 16 is adapted to produce a vibration signal whose wave form is similar to that of a continuous alternating current as shown at a in FIG. 3. The mechanism 18 is adapted to produce a vibration signal whose Wave form is like that of a surging alternating current as shown at b in FIG. 3 while the mechanism 20 is adapted to produce a vibration signal, the wave form of which is like that of an interrupted alternating current as illustrated at c in FIG. 3.

Although the mechanisms 11, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 may produce vibrations by mechanical means having the various wave forms previously described, those skilled in the art will readily recognize that the same mechanisms may, with equal facility, produce electrical currents having the same wave forms. It should also be recognized that the wave forms here disclosed are in no way limiting upon the scope of the invention and that numerous wave forms each of different desired characteristics may be produced in the manner well known in the art and, therefore, those hereshown are for purpose of illustration and description only and are not to be deemed limiting upon the scope of the invention.

In the event the mechanisms 11 to 20 are electrical current producing structures, a source of electricity is supplied and connected therewith. In the case of the mechanisms 11, 12 and 14, the electrical source of supply may be a DO. generator 22 whereas in the case of the mechanisms 16, 18 and 20, the source of electricity may emanate from an A.C. generator 24. Each of the mechanisms-11, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 is connected with a selectively operable switching mechanism here entitled selector mechanism and identified by the numeral 26. In actual use, the mechanism 26 may be in the form of a manually rotatable and selectively operable switching knob, portions of which are adapted to receive the currents produced by the various mechanisms 11, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 and to selectively schedule the receipt of such currents and permit the same to be transmitted in a desired order to a pair of conventional body applicator means, as pads 28 and 30 connected therewith.

The use of body applicator pads 28 and 30 are well known and may be of any convenient construction. They are adapted to receive the currents transmit-ted to them by way of the switching mechanism 26 and to apply them directly or convert such currents to vibrations for application to selected portions of the body. In-

cluded within the apparatus is a device for selectively controlling the intensity of the currents or vibrations transmitted by the mechanism 26 to the body applicator means 28 and 30.

Byselective control of the switching mechanism 26, any one of the currents or vibrations produced by the mechanisms 11 to 20 inclusive may be selected for transmission to the applicator pads 28 and 30 for application to selected portions of the body. However, because it has been found in the actual practice of the art of physiotherapy that muscles fatigue rapidly and patients tire quickly when subjected to but a single type of Vibration or current characteristic for too long a period, the present invention enables the manually controllable switching operation of the mechanism 26 to be used so that a plurality of currents or vibrations can be selected for transmission from any one or more of the mechanisms 11, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 and scheduled in a desired sequence and combined together in a single cycle of the operation of the apparatus 10 for application to the body of the patient. This application of a plurality of characteristically different vibrations or currents to a particular portion of the body of the patient in a single cycle and cyclically repeated prevents the body muscles from becoming acclimated to any one type of vibration or current characteristic and, therefore, enables longer periods of treatment without fatiguing the muscles or tiring the patient. In consequence, the multiple different characteristic vibrations or currents combined in a single cycle which is repeated and applied cyclically to the body enables the physiotherapist to increase the intensity of the vibrations or currents to a greater value than was able to be done heretofore each time therapy treatment is given. Hence, stimulation of the muscles is more quickly achieved and recovery enhanced.

FIG. 2 illustrates a form of the apparatus 10 wherein the alternating current generator 24 is connected to a terminal 60 of a single-pole double-throw switch 62. The other terminal 64 of the switch 60 is connected to a battery 34. The armature 66 of the switch 62 is connected to one end of the resistance of the potentiometer 32. A lead 68 connects the common terminals of the potentiometer 32, generator 24 and battery 34. Thus, by selective operation of the switch 62, either the generator 24 or the battery 34 may be connected across the resistance of the potentiometer 32. One of the body applicator pads 28 is connected to the common terminal of the potentiometer 32 while the movable tap of the potentiometer is connected with a plurality of contacts each connected with a different value resistor of the surging alternating current mechanism 18. The potentiometer 32 effectively varies the maximum amplitude of the signals produced by the device 10. The interrupted alternating current mechanism 20 is connected in series with the mechanism 18 and has a plurality of serial-1y connected contacts 36. The selector mechanism 26 previously described in connection with FIG. 1 includes an electrically driven motor 38 which is operated by the source of direct current 34.

The motor operatively rotates a pair of sweeper contact arms 40 and 42 by a common or through shaft 44. By selective operation of the switching mechanism 26, the arms 40 and 42 may be caused to engage with the respective electrical contacts of the mechanisms 18 and 20. Thus, during the operation of the apparatus 10, the motor 38 will drive both sweeper arms 40 and 42 by way of the connecting shaft 44, all of which form a part of the switching mechanism 26. As the arm 40 sweeps into and out of electrical contact with the contact elements of the mechanism 18, a surging alternating current will be produced, it being assumed that the generator 24 is connected across the potentiometer 37 by the switch 62. This alternating surging current is transmitted through the sweeper arm 40 to the body applicator means in the form of the pads 28 and 30. 1

The maximum intensity of the surging alternating current is intimately controllable by the operation of the variable tap of the potentiometer 32. As the surging alternating current is received at the body applicator pads 28 and 30, they may apply the current directly or convert the current pulses to corresponding vibrations which they transmit and apply to the body. A single cycle wave form of surging alternating current produced by the mechanism 18 is illustrated at b in FIG. 3. The amplitude of the surging alternating current as shown in FIG. 3b is initially zero, but it rises gradually to a maximum where it stays for a short time before it again gradually falls to zero. This is accomplished by graduating the values of the resistors which are connected to the switch 18. The largest valued resistor is designated 48 and is on the left in FIG. 2, and the lowest in value is resistor 50 to the right. As the motor 38 rotates in the direction shown by the arrow, the arm is first connected to the resistor 48, then in sequence to lower valued resistors until resistor 50, then to the contacts 52 which are directly connected to the potentiometer 32, and then again to resistor 50 and the other resistors in sequence, including resistor 48. Since the same resistors are used to determine both the rising and the falling amplitudes of the leading and lagging ends of the surging alternating current, each cycle is symmetrical about its center. As the sweeper arm 40 passes beyond the last of the contacts of the mechanism 18, it moves into engagement with a contact plate 46 which then connects sweeper arm 42 for operative engagement with the electrical contacts 36 of the mechanism 20.

The mechanism 20 is adapted to produce an interrupted alternating current such as the cycle wave form shown at c in FIG. 3. The intensity of the pulses of this alternating current is controllable at 32 by operation of the tap thereof. The duration of the interrupted alternating current is controlled at the switching mechanism 26 by the extent of the bar 46 and its engagement by the sweeper contact arm 40. A continuous alternating current signal is produced when the sweeper contact arm 40 engages a bar 70, which is connected directly to the movable tap of the potentiometer 32. Direct current surging, interrupted and continuous signals may be produced by connecting the armature 66 of the switch 62 with the terminal 64 thereby to connect the direct current source 34 across the potentiometer 32. Moreover, any one or more of the surging, continuous or interrupted signals may be discontinued by opening one or more of the respective switches 72, 74 or 76 to disconnect the respective mechanism 18, bar 70 and mechanism 20 from the energizing source. Thus, during each cycle of operation of the ap paratus 10, the mechanism 26 may be selectively operated to combine and schedule in sequence currents or vibrations produced by any of the mechanisms 11, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 within a single cycle and cyclically repeat such sequence of produced currents and vibrations of different characteristics for application to the body of the patient.

Referring now to FIG. 3 and in particular to the wave form at f thereof, there is shown the wave for-ms produced by the mechanisms 18 and 20 combined within a single cycle of operation of the apparatus 10. At a in FIG. 3, the continuous alternating current wave form .thereshown is normally that produced by conventional therapeutic apparatuses and shows a multiplicity of cyclical repititions of the same wave form. The single cycle of the wave form of the surging alternating current illustrated at b of FIG. 3 has been combined with one of the cycles of the plurality of cycles of the interrupted alternating current wave form shown at c of FIG. 3. Thus, 1 of FIG. 3 diagrammatically illustrates the operation of the apparatus 10 wherein a plurality of wave forms each of diflerent characteristics are combined in a single cycle and a cyclically repeated for application to the patient.

As the wave forms are transmitted to and received by the body applicator pads 28 and 30, they may be applied directly or converted to corresponding vibrations of different characteristics of operation and, thereafter, applied to the patient for as long as the physiotherapist wishes to subject him to treatment. It is noted that FIG. 2 discloses a manner of combining a plurality of currents or vibrations of different characteristics in a single cycle of operation of the apparatus 10. Obviously, it is possible from the teaching of the present invention that a combination of a plurality of characteristically different vibrations or currents may be applied .to the patient during a single cycle of operation of the apparatus and not just the surging and interrupted alternating currents as illustrated and described.

While there have been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel features of the invention as applied to a preferred embodiment thereof, it will be understood that various omissions and substitutions and changes in the form and details of the device illustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art, Without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the claims appended hereto.

I claim:

1. An electrical therapeutic apparatus comprising a source of electrical energy;

a pair of applicators for applying electrical currents to a patient;

lead means for connecting one of said pair of applicators to one side of said source;

means for limiting the flow of current from said source to said applicators;

said limiting means comprising a first impedance connected to said source,

second impedance means having a plurality of determinable values serially connected with said first impedance,

first switching means for connecting to the other applicator graduated values of said second impedance means to produce a gradually increasing and then gradually decreasing value of currents applied to said pair of applicators during the first portion of a cycle of operation of said apparatus,

and second switch means for connecting to said other applicator said first impedance to produce a constant value of current applied to said pair of applicators during a second portion of a cycle of operation of said apparatus;

and means for sequentially operating said first and second switch means to produce electric currents having difierent characteristics during a cycle of operation of said apparatus.

2. In an electric therapeutic apparatus which includes a pair of applicators for applying electrical signals to a patient, a generator for generating electrical signals having ditfering characteristics and applying them in sequence to said applicators, said generator comprising a source of electrical energy, a first rotary switch, said first rotary switch comprising a plurality of first contacts and a first movable arm which engages said first contacts in sequence, a second rotary switch having a plurality of second contacts and a second movable arm which engages said second contacts in sequence, a plurality of resistors having graduated values, means for connecting one end of all of said resistors together and to one side of said source, means for connecting the individual other ends of said resistors to individual ones of said first contacts so that as said first movable arm sweeps across said first contacts in sequence it engages one end of resistors with decreasing resistance and then with the increasing resistance, means for connecting said first movable arm to one of said applicators, means for connecting the other side of said source to the other of said applicators, means for connecting said one side of said source to said second contacts, means for electrically connecting said first and said second movable arms together for a second sequential portion of each cycle of operation, said means including a contact bar positioned to be engaged by said first arm after said first arm engages said first contacts, and means for causing said first and second movable arms to engage said first and second contacts in sequence so that rising and falling current is applied to said applicators for a portion of a cycle and an interrupted current is applied to said applicators during said second sequential portion of a cycle.

3. An electric therapeutic apparatus for generating electrical signals for application to a patient,

said apparatus comprising a source of electrical energy, a pair of applicators for applying electric current to a patient, means for generating electrical signals which vary in intensity with time, said generating means comprising a rotary switch having a movable arm and a plurality of first contacts and a second contact, each of said plurality of first contacts and said second contact being engaged in sequence by said arm, a plurality of resistors graduated in value, means for connecting one side of all of said resistors together and to a common line, means for connecting said common line to one side of said source, the other side of each of said resistors being individually connected to a different one of said plurality of first contacts, means for connecting said movable arm to one of said applicators, means for connecting the other of said applicators to the other side of said source, means for causing said movable arm to sequentially pass over said plurality of first contacts to apply currents of graduated amplitude to said applicators, and means for connecting said second contact to said common line to apply current of constant amplitude to said applicators after the currents of graduated amplitude have been applied thereto.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

W. -E. KAMM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2182223 *Sep 5, 1936Dec 5, 1939Dobert Joseph HElectrophysiotherapeutical apparatus
US2532788 *Aug 20, 1949Dec 5, 1950Stanley J SarnoffArtificial respiration by electronic stimulation
US2830578 *Jan 31, 1957Apr 15, 1958Mark E DegroffElectro-sonic apparatus
US2838672 *Jun 29, 1954Jun 10, 1958Physical Medicine Products CoElectro-therapy generator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3886931 *Dec 1, 1972Jun 3, 1975Rodler Ing HansElectrodiagnostic apparatus
US3954111 *Jul 17, 1974May 4, 1976Koh SatoElectric therapeutical apparatus with audio frequency band alternating current
US4456012 *Feb 22, 1982Jun 26, 1984Medtronic, Inc.Iontophoretic and electrical tissue stimulation device
US4769881 *Sep 2, 1986Sep 13, 1988Pedigo Irby RApplying transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation to a patient
US4938223 *Mar 28, 1988Jul 3, 1990T. H. Charters, Inc.Transcutaneous nerve block device
US5324317 *Sep 30, 1992Jun 28, 1994Medserve Group, Inc.Interferential stimulator for applying low frequency alternating current to the body
US5387231 *Jun 3, 1994Feb 7, 1995Sporer; PatsyElectrotherapy method
US5476481 *Sep 14, 1992Dec 19, 1995Robert LeyFor treating tissue
US6029090 *Jan 27, 1998Feb 22, 2000Herbst; EwaMulti-functional electrical stimulation system
US6526319Feb 22, 2001Feb 25, 2003Tatsuyuki KobayashiLiving body stimulating apparatus
US6535767Aug 21, 2001Mar 18, 2003James W. KronbergApparatus and method for bioelectric stimulation, healing acceleration and pain relief
US7117034Jun 24, 2004Oct 3, 2006Healthonics, Inc.Apparatus and method for bioelectric stimulation, healing acceleration, pain relief, or pathogen devitalization
USRE43374 *Mar 18, 2005May 8, 2012Medrelief Inc.Apparatus and method for bioelectric stimulation, healing acceleration and pain relief
EP1136097A1 *Jan 23, 2001Sep 26, 2001Techno Link Co., Ltd.Living body stimulating apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/66, 607/76, 607/71, 607/72
International ClassificationA61N1/32, A61H23/02, A61N1/36
Cooperative ClassificationA61N1/32, A61H2023/0209, A61N1/36003, A61H23/02, A61H2201/10, A61N1/36014
European ClassificationA61N1/36E, A61N1/36, A61H23/02, A61N1/32