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Publication numberUS3294134 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1966
Filing dateMay 21, 1964
Priority dateMay 21, 1964
Publication numberUS 3294134 A, US 3294134A, US-A-3294134, US3294134 A, US3294134A
InventorsMatross Irving B, Samuel Matross
Original AssigneeMontrose Mfg Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wardrobe bag
US 3294134 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 2-7, 1966 l. B. MATRoss ETAL 3,294,134

WARDROBE BAG Dec. 27, 1966 l. B. MATRoss ETAL 3,294,134

WARDROBE BAG 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 2l, 1964 Iouter side wall members.

United States Patent C) 3,294,134 v WARDROBE BAG Irving B. Matross, Newton Center, and Samuel Matross, Brighton, Mass., assignors to Montrose Manufacturing Company, Incorporated, Boston, Mass., a corporation of Massachusetts Filed May 21, 1964, Ser. No. 369,121 9 Claims. (Cl. 15G- 1) This invention relates to wardrobe bags formed of flexible web material and in particular to Wardrobe bags which provide a multiplicity of vertically spaced apart compartments that are accessible from a vertical edge of the bag.

One principal object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive wardrobe bag which can store wardrobe articles in a highly compact relation.

Another object is to provide an improved, extensible wardrobe bag, which, in its relaxed state, occupies virtually no'space in a closet, and expands to occupy only so much space as is required by the articles it contains.

Another object is to provide a wardrobe bag having compartments adapted to be extended vertically, as well as laterally, to receive wardrobe articles of various dimensions.

Another object is to provide an extensible wardrobe bag having protrusion-free outer side walls, sui-table to be hung in a closet from a rod side by side with clothes, without interfering with the clothes, and also suitable for use as a luggage container.

A further object is to provide accessible and compact moth-proof storage for woolen articles.

A still further principal object of the invention is to provide a wardrobe bag of unique construction, and suitable for being made from transparent plastic.

These objects, and others which in part are obvious Vand in part will appear herein, are realized through the combination of two outer side Wall members of web material each extending along the length of the bag, and a single vinner side wall member extending between the v The inner side wall has a running length substantially longer than the corresponding running length of the outer side walls, is configured into a multiplicity of vertically spaced apart special loops,

tending joints. The special loop configuration is defined inthe following way: In the relaxed state the inner side wall extends freely, i.e. without being joined to either outer side wall, from a first transverse joint with one of the other side walls downwardly a first distance thence upwardly a second distance substantially greater than the first distance to a second transverse joint with the other of said outer side walls. From this second transverse joint the inner side wall then extends freely downwardly a third distance less than the second distance, and thence upwardly a fourth distance substantially greater than the third distance to a third transverse joint. The parts of the inner side wall and the corresponding outer side wall Preferably, according to the invention, the third distance is substantially less than the difference between the first and second distances to obtain the proper amount of overlap. Furthermore, preferably, the first-and third dimensions are equal substantially to the same value and 3,294,134 Patented Dec. 27, 1966 the second and fourth dimensions are equal substantially to four times this value.

While, broadly, the invention may not be so limited, it is preferable, and an important concept of the invention, to have a series of such compartments extend substantially the full length of the bag, and to have the bag of a vertically elongated form, shaped to hang from a closet rod.

Preferably, .i.e. for dust proof, moth proof or security reasons, the bag is closed at both vertical edges, which could be accomplished by two zippers where the closet is to be accessible from both edges. But in the usual case, it is preferred to close one edge of the bag permanently, and for this purpose, according to the invention, one vertical edge of the inner side wall is secured to corresponding vertical edges of both outer side walls in a joint extending at least substantially continuously throughout the extent of the inner side wall. partments thus formed are accessible only from the opposite vertical dege of the bag.

In a construction particularly advantageous for plastic lilm, the vertical edges of all of the walls are secured to vertical reinforcing strapping members.

For a permanently closed vertical edge, it is preferable that all three side members be joined together by a single vertical strapping member, folded, on the outside, over the outside margin of the two outer side walls, while at the vertical edge of the bag through which access is to be had, each of the side walls has its own vertical strapping member. In a zippered construction, the cooperating pair of zipper members are secured respectively to the vertical strapping members on the two outer side walls, and the corresponding edge of the inner side wall is located inwardly thereof.

Furthermore in a preferred construction for plastic lilm each transverse joint between the inner side wall and one of the outer side walls comprises two transverse strapping members, one on the outside of the outer side wall, the other on the side of the inner side wall directed away from said outer side wall with securing means, preferably stitching, though heat-sealing is possible, joining together the two transverse strapping members, and the intervening inner and outer side walls. Preferably, the transverse o strapping members, at their ends, are secured to the Vertivwalls be joined together to form an endless loop, with the location of the joint spaced from the ends of the bag, whereby the ends of the bag are formed by end-folds of continuous side wall material, it being preferred that the inner side wall terminates short of these e-nd folds.

To illustrate the foregoing concepts a preferred embodiment is presented in the drawings wherein: FIG. 1 is a vertical side View of one side of a wardrobe bag according to the invention; FIG. 2 is a vertical edge View of the wardrobe bag according to the invention with the bag in a substantially relaxed state, with no articles contained therein; FIG. 3 is a vertical side view of the other side of the embodiment; FIG. 4'is a top View of the bag with one vertical edge open for access to the compartments therein; FIG. 5 is a top View, similar to FIG. 4, with both vertical edges closed; FIGS. 6 and 7 are horizontal crosssectional Views taken onlines 6 6 and 7-7 of FIG. 3, of the vertical edge of the bag through which access may be had, FIG. 7 showing half the bag cross section as 0pposed to FIG. 6 which shows the entire bag cross section; FIG. 8 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on line 8 8 of the permanently closed vertical edge of the bag;

The interior of the com- FIG. 9 is a vertical cross-sectional view similar to the plicity of vertically spaced apart special loops, the running length of the inner side wall 24 being substantially longer than the corresponding running lengths of the outer side Walls 20 and 22. The inner side wall 24 is secured' to the outer side walls alternately between the loops, e.g. at transverse joints 26, 28, 30 and 32.

For the special loop construction, referring particularly to FIG. 9, the inner side wall 24, from a first transverse joint 26 on outer side wall 20, extends freely, i.e. without being joined to either side wall 20 or 22, downwardly a first distance L1, thence upwardly a second distance L2 substantially greater than the first distance L1, to a second y transverse joint 28 with the other of the outer side walls j 22. From this second transverse joint 28, the inner side wall 24 then extends freely downwardly a third distance L3 less than the second distance, and thence upwardly a fourth distance L4 substantially greater than the third distance L3 to a third transverse joint 58.

As is preferred, the first and third dimensions, L1 and L3, are equal to each other, and the second and fourth dimensions, L2 and L4, are equal to substantially four times that value.

As can be seen in FIG. 2, in a preferred embodiment the series of compartments defined by the looped inner side wall 24 extends throughout substantially the full length of the bag. y

Feferring to FIGS. 13v, preferably the outer side walls v20 and 22 are joined, e.g. at joint 62, into a continuous truding from the mid point.

Preferably, the walls 20, 22, 24 are each formed of transparent plastic film, for example a window clear .004 inch thick vinyl plastic, in many instances such construction enabling the user to see, from one side of the bag,

the entire contents' of the bag, despite the fact that some of the articles lie in compartments on the opposite side of the inner side wall member.

Preferably, for plastic construction, the strapping member system as shown in FIGS. 6-9 is employed. Referring f ,A f

to FIG. 6, the vertical edge 36 of the bag at which access to the compartments is to be had is preferably provided p with a zipper. For this purpose the corresponding vertical edges of the outer walls 20 and 22 are provided with `vertical strapping members 42 and 44,` bent aboutthev vertical edges,l and zipper support cloth members 38 and 40 have their margins secured face to face with the walls as shown, the strapping members 42 and 44 being bent about both, and secured, preferably by stitching as shown. The corresponding vertical edge of therinner side wall 24 is offset as shown in FIG. 6 so as to be clear of the zipper 46 when it is closed. The edge of this inner side wall 24 is similarly provided with a vertical strapping member 55 which is bent about the edge and secured, preferably by stitching as shown.

Referring to FIGS. 7 and 9, the inner side wall 24 is secured at a transverse joint 26 to therouter side Wall 20 vby means of inner strapping member 50 and'outer strapping member 52, the 4former disposed on the side of the 20 to which it is secured, and the other strapping member linner side wall directed away from the outer side wallv 20, as shown. The two strapping members 50 and 52, and the'intervening side wall members 20 and 24 are secured together, preferably by stitching as shown.

Referring to FIG. 7, the transversely extending strapping members 50 and 52 extend beyond the vertical edge of inner side wall 24 and its vertical strapping member 55, and the ends thereof are secured, along with the margin of outer side wall 20 and the zipper cloth 38, within the vertical strapping member 42.

Referring to FIG. 8, the vertical edge 34 of the bag is permanently closed, margins of the side walls 20, 22 and 24 being disposed within the confines of vertical strapping member 48 bent thereabouts and secured, preferably by stitching. As seen in FIG. 2, the cross-section of FIG. 8 is taken through the bottom of one of the loops in the inner side wall 24, and, accordingly, three layers of the inner side wall 24 are secured at the closed edge 34 of the bag. The ends of the horizontal strapping members are secured with vertical strapping member 48, similar to the manner shown for the opposite edge in FIG. 7.

Referring to FIG. 9 it will be seen that a series of cornpartments, A, B, C and D are defined by the loops of the inner side wall 24, secured by outer strapping members 52, 54 and 58, and inner strapping members 50, 56 and 60 as described above.

In FIG. 9 the bag is shown in a substantially relaxed state, without contents, though sufficiently distended in order to show the relationship of the various components. It will be seen, that due to the specified dimensions of the various portions of the loops, the compartments overlap each other, and the loops of the inner side wall at both top and bottom of each compartment provide for substantial adjustment of the dimensions of the compartments without inuence upon the form of the outer side wall members, though of course they can be flexed also.

Referring to FIG. l0 an article of substantial vertical dimension is inserted in compartment A, substantially filling the entire space between the inner and outer side walls 20 and 22. The article is substantially taller than the compartment in its relaxed state, accordingly the loop defining the top of the compartment is distended upwardly, rather than in the normal downward drooping relationship. Accordingly compartment B as well as compartment C, is altered substantially in form, but in compartmentl D another article identical to the article inserted in compartment A, can be inserted.

Referring to FIG. 11 an article is inserted in compartment A having only substantially one-half the thickness of the yoverall thickness of the-bag, and identical articles are inserted in compartment B, C and D, the inner side wall 24 between successive joints, e.g. joints 28 and 30, assuming an S shaped configuration with a substantially straight vertical run in the mid portion.

Referring to FIG. 12, identical articles are again inserted in the compartments A, B, C and D, but of lesser vertical extent, with the unique result that from one side of the bag,\e.g. through outer wall 20, every article within the bag can be seen, as indicated by the horizontall arrows, despite the fact that certain of the articles e.g. the contents of compartments B and D, lie on the opposite side of the bag.

Referring toA FIG. 13, the fact that the outer side wall 20 and 22 can be laterally distended is illustrated, here defining triangular compartments of substantial volume.

From consideration of FIGS. 9 through 13 it will be obvious that numerous articles of widely different shapes can be inserted in various compartments within the same bag, the bag adjusting to the form of the particular articles.

Among the numerous possible uses of the bag are the dust free storage of handbags and shoes, the moth-proof storage of small woolen items such as mittens, hats and scarves, as well as of sweaters and larger woolens, and the Storage of. mens shirts...

What is claimed is:

1. In an elongated wardrobe bag of the type formed of exible web material, providing a multiplicity of vertically spaced apart compartments accessible from a vertical edge of the bag, said bag having means adapted to support said bag, the improvement wherein said bag comprises the combination of two outer side wall members of flexible web material each extending along the length of said bag and an inner side wall member extending at least along a portion of the length of said outer side wall members, said inner side wall member having a running length substantially longer than the corresponding running length of said outer side wall members, said inner side wall member being configured into a multiplicity of vertically spaced apart special loops, and said inner side wall member secured to said outer side wall members alternatively between said loops by transversely extending joints, said inner side wall member at least extending freely from a first transverse joint with one of said outer side wall members, downwardly a irst distance, thence upwardly a second distance substantially greater than said first distance to a second transverse joint with the other of said outer side wall members, thence freely downwardly a third distance less than said second distance, thence upwardly a fourth distance substantially greater than said third distance to a third transverse joint, the running length of inner side wall from said first to said third joints and the length of outer side wall between said first and third joints defining a first compartment, the portion of said inner side wall member extending between said second and third transverse joints forming the bottom ofthe next above compartment, and said compartments caused to vertically overlap due to said relationship of said third and fourth distances,

2. The wardrobe bag of claim 1 wherein said third distance is substantially less than the difference between said first and second distances.

3. The wardrobe bag of claim 1 wherein said first and third distances are equal substantially to the same value, and said second and fourth distances are equal substantially to four times said value.

4. The wardrobe bag of claim 1 wherein said inner side wall member extends substantially above said third joint, and defines a series of loops like those between said first and third joints.

5. The wardrobe bag of claim 1 where said inner side wall member is secured to both of said outer side wall members in a vertical, permanently closed joint extending at least substantially continuously throughout the extent of said inner side wall member, said joint located at one of the vertical edges of said bag, the interior of the compartments formed by said inner side wall member accessible only from the opposite vertical edge of said bag.

6. The wardrobe bag of claim 1 wherein said inner and outer side wall members are formed of plastic film, the vertical edges of all of said wall members secured to vertical reinforcing strapping members, and said transverse joints each comprising tWo transverse strapping members, one on the outside of the respective outer side wall member, the other on the side of said inner side wall member directed away from said respective outer side wall member, securing means joining together said two transverse strapping members and the intervening inner and outer side wall members, said transverse strapping members, at their ends, secured to the vertical strapping members of said respective outer side wall member.

7. The wardrobe of clam 6 wherein, at one vertical edge of said bag, all three side members are joined together by a vertical strapping member, folded, on the outside,

l over outside margin portions of said two outer side wall members, each side Wall member having its own vertical strapping member at the opposite vertical edge, except at said transverse joints said last mentioned vertical edge of said inner said wall member being free of said outer side wall members.

8. The wardrobe bag of claim 7 having an elongated zipper adapted to close said bag at said opposite vertical edge, said zipper having two elongated cooperating zipper members wherein each of said elongated zipper members is joined to one of the outer side wall members and its vertical strapping member along said opposite vertical edge, the corresponding edge of said inner side wall member located inwardly thereof.

9. The wardrobe bag of claim 1 adapted to hang side by side with clothes hanging from hangers on a rod, and to occupy no more space in said closet than required by contents in said bag, wherein said two outer side wall members are joined together by joining means to form an endless loop, the location of said joining means spaced from the ends of said bag, whereby the ends of said bag are formed by end folds of continuous side wall material.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,177,906 10/ 1939 Miller 206-7 2,845,185 7 195 8 Wnderweedle 206-7 2,974,780 3/ 1961 ODonovan 206-7 3,139,165 6/ 1964 Toussig 190-41 FOREIGN PATENTS 27,939 1909 Great Britain. 455,192 10/ 1936 Great Britain.

JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2177906 *Jun 21, 1938Oct 31, 1939Morris MillerProtective container
US2845185 *Oct 5, 1954Jul 29, 1958Winderweedle Jr Howell WShoe hanger
US2974780 *Mar 10, 1959Mar 14, 1961O'donovan Dorris EPetticoat and slip cuddler
US3139165 *May 13, 1963Jun 30, 1964Beaut Ease Products CoMulti-purpose container for clothing
GB455192A * Title not available
GB190927939A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3331513 *Jun 24, 1965Jul 18, 1967Cappelli Sylvie SShoe butler
US4947987 *Jul 24, 1989Aug 14, 1990Keenan Kathleen CReady access hang-up storage and retrieval device for articles of wear
US5065864 *Dec 20, 1990Nov 19, 1991American Tourister, Inc.Laundry valet
US5248036 *Oct 23, 1991Sep 28, 1993The Merchandisers, Inc.Strip type point-of-sale display unit
US6467613 *Dec 11, 2000Oct 22, 2002Donald H. FelsenthalPocket assembly for multiple shoe rack bag
US7891733 *Mar 23, 2009Feb 22, 2011Christopher Shay ClarkeOriginal backseat plan holder
US20070045360 *Mar 7, 2006Mar 1, 2007Stacy GrimesScarf hanger
US20110186531 *Jan 27, 2011Aug 4, 2011Nancy AdamDoor and wall suspended caddy for supporting embroidery stabilizer rolls
EP1808093A1 *Jan 16, 2006Jul 18, 2007Wen-Tsan WangHanging cabinet
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/39, 206/287
International ClassificationA47G25/00, A47G25/54
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/54
European ClassificationA47G25/54