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Publication numberUS3295271 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1967
Filing dateJan 2, 1963
Priority dateJan 2, 1963
Publication numberUS 3295271 A, US 3295271A, US-A-3295271, US3295271 A, US3295271A
InventorsJohn P Dorris
Original AssigneeJohn P Dorris
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Burial crypt and method of installation
US 3295271 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1967 J. P. DoRRls 3,295,271

BURIAL CRYPT AND METHOD OF INSTALLATION Filed Jan. 2. 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 liz-7' INVENTR.

52 Joh/z P ofvs 2 A Tron/V575 Jan. 3, 1967 J. P. DoRms 3,295,271

BURIAL CRYPT AND METHOD OF INSTALLATION Filed Jan. 2. 1963 3 SheetsSheet 2 A T TG'RNEYS Jan. 3, 1967 J. P. DQRRIS 3,295,271

BURIAL CRYPT AND METHOD OF INSTALLATION Filed Jan. 2. 1963 :5 Sheets-Sheet :5

IN VEN TOR.

A TTOR/VEYS r"United States Patent O 3,295,271 BURIAL @naar AND Mitrnon or rNsrALLArroN Eohn P. Dorris, 5301 River Ave., Newport Beach, Calif. 92660 Filed Jan. 2, 1963, Ser. No. 249,078 11i Claims. (Cl. 52-124) This invention relates to burial crypts and to a method of installation thereof.

More specifically, the invention relates to an improved precast, plural compartment, concrete burial crypt and to a unique method of installing a group of such crypts utilizing a minimum of space and requiring a minimum of time, labor and expense.

At the present time, it is the custom in many places to dig individua] grave openings in cemetery plots with considerable space `between adjacent openings for boxes or crypts adapted to contain a single casket. As a result of this custom, considerable space remains unused above and between coiiin receptacles. In recent years, the cemetery population has increased to such an extent that in many areas burial space is scarce and very expensive. Therefore, it is essential in such areas to make the utmost use of all available cemetery space for interment purposes.

Accordingly, it is the principal object of this invention to provide a multiple burial crypt structure that can be economically manufactured and be quickly and inexpensively installed in contiguous relationship with any desired number of similar structures.

`Another object is to provide a burial crypt which can be easily handled and moved about by conventional lifting and transporting devices of moderate size and capacity.

A further object is to provide a burial crypt that can be readily divided into separate sections to have interments made therein, one above the other.

A still further object is to provide a reinforced concrete burial crypt that is easy to cast, is strong and economical to manufacture, and includes divider and cover elements that can be readily assembled therewith.

Still another object is to provide a method of constructing a burial area with underground crypts without excavating holes in which to bury the crypts.

A still further object is to provide a burial area, as above described, wherein the crypts are sealed, and wherein access can be obtained to any given crypt with a minimum of effort.

These and other objects of the invention will become more apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary plan view of a burial area having a group of crypts installed in the ground and covered with earth, a portion of the earth, etc., being broken away to show in solid lines the entire top of one crypt, and a portion of contiguous crypts;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical, sectional View taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1, showing caskets in dot-and-dash lines in three sections of one crypt and with the panels which divide one of the compartments of the crypt into two sections, illustrated in dot-and-dash lines in a partly raised position;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical sectional view through the crypt cover, taken on the line 3--3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary, longitudinal sectional view taken on the line 4 4 of FIG. 2, showing a group of crypts installed in the ground end-to-end;

FIG. .5 is an enlarged, horizontal, sectional view through a single crypt, taken on the line 5--5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical, sectional View taken on the line 66 of FIG. 5, showing the re- 3,2%,271 Patented dan. 3, 1957 ICC cesses in the partition and one side wall, and the divider panels seated on the shoulders of the recesses;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical, sectional view taken on the line 7--7 of FIG. 5, through a handling opening cast in the bottom of the crypt adjacent one corner thereof;

FIG. 8 is a perspective View, partially broken awa of one of the crypts partially assembled with a portion of the lifting device employed therewith shown in dot-and-dash lines;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a device for lifting and moving the crypts illustrated in FIGS. l through 8;

FIG. l0 is a fragmentary, sectional View similar to FIG. 7, but showing a modified structure including a circular depression below the handling openings; and

FG. 11 is a fragmentary plan view of the structure shown in FIG. l0.

Each crypt, which is generally identified by the numeral 1, includes a body portion 2, preferably cast from concrete and reinforced by metal rods or wire mesh 2a in any desired manner. The body 2 includes a bottom wall 3, side walls 5 and 7, and end walls 9 and 11, the side and end walls all being of equal height. The interior of the body 2 is divided into two parallel compartments A and B, of substantially the same size, by a partition 13 which is located at a zone midway between the side walls 5 and 7. The partition 13 is of a height equal to that of the end walls 9 and 11 and is integral with the bottom wall 3 and the end walls 9 and 11. 1n order to cast the body 2 in one piece and to provide for easy removal of the inner molds from the casting, the side walls 5 and 7, end walls 9 and 11, and the partition 13 are tapered upwardly a few degrees from the bottom 3.

A horizontal recess 15 is formed in the inner side of each of the side walls 5 and 7, and on both sides of the partition 13, extending from one end wall 9 to the other end wall 11. The lower portion of each of the recesses 15 terminates in a flat ledge 17, which is disposed about midway between the inner surface of the bottom wall 3 and the top edge of the side walls 5 and 7 and the partition 13. It will thus be seen that the recesses 15 in the partition 13, and the recess in the respective side walls in each compartment A and B, are disposed in opposed relationship, with all of the ledges 17 lying in a common horizontal plane.

Each compartment A and B can be divided into upper and lower sections by a series of rectangular-shaped panels 19, which are adapted to be disposed in side-byside relationship with their ends resting on the ledges 17. The panels 19 are adapted to be installed and removed by raising one end and pivoting the vother end on its supporting ledge 17, as illustrated in dot-anddash lines in FIG. 2. In order to permit the panels 19 to be pivoted in this manner, it is necessary to extend the recesses 15 upwardly a distance sutlicient to assure that the distance between the upper edge of one of the recesses 1S and the ledge 17 of the opposed recess is greater than the maximum length of the panel 19. This arrangement permits the panels 19 to be pivoted about the end thereof which is resting on a ledge 17 and also permits the other end to freely pass the upper edge of the opposed recess.

As is best shown in FlG. 6, the recesses 15 are preferably tapered slightly upwardly to provide a greater depth at the upper portion than at the lower portion thereof in order to make the installation and removal of the panels 19 easier. As is illustrated -in FIG. 6, the recesses 15 terminate at their upper edges in inclined shoulders 23 spaced above and longitudinally parallel with the ledges 17. The series of panels 19, which is adapted to be disposed on ledges 17 in edge to edge, or side-by-side, relationship, extends from the end wall 9 to the end wall 11 to form a substantially continuous solid wall between the upper and lower sections in each compartment A and B. The corners in each compartment are bevelled at to strengthen the crypt and further facilitate removal of the inner molding forms (not shown) and the corners of the extreme end panels 19 are correspondingly bevelled at 22, as is best illustrated in FIG. 8. Likewise, a bevel 24 is provided at the juncture of the bottom wall 3 with the side Walls 5 and "7, the end walls 9 and 11, and the partition 13, as in FIGS. 2 and 4.

Each compartment A and B of the body 2 is adapted to be closed by a top wall consisting of a series of slabs 25 seated on the top surface of the adjacent side walls 5 and 7 and the partition 13 with the outside edge of the slab at each end of each compartment being seated on the adjacent end walls 9 and 11 and being substantially flush therewith, The slabs 25 are disposed in side-by-side and end-to-end abutting relationship in order to cover both compartments A and B, each slab preferably being bevelled from the bottom upwardly around its entire periphery, as indicated at 26, to form open V-shaped channels 27 between adjacent slabs. The slabs 25 in each series have end edges 28 that are disposed on end walls S and 7, but are spaced inwardly from the outer surface of the walls, as best illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 8, thus providing a seat 3i) for grout or mortar 32 which is employed to seal these joints and to fill and seal the V- shaped channels 27 formed between abutting slabs 25.

The bottom wall 3 of crypt 2 is formed adjacent the corners thereof with elongated handling openings 29, all of which preferably extend in the same direction, that is, lengthwise of the crypt 1. These openings extend completely through the bottom wall 3 and are intended to permit any moisture collecting in the crypt to drain therethrough. The openings 29 also permit portions of a device employed to lift and transport the crypts to pass therethrough, as will be explained later. The lower surface 31 of the bottom wall 3 is provided with an elongated depression 33. As is best illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8, each depression 33 extends at right angles to its associated elongated opening 29, the -centers of the corresponding elongated openings 29 and 33 being coaxial, thus forming, in effect, a cross-shaped configuration.

A device that can be employed to lift and handle the crypts 1 is illustrated in FIG. 9 and includes a rigid rectangular frame 35 formed of side members 37 and end members 39. Cables 41 extend upwardly from eye bolts 43 attached to the frame 35 adjacent the corners thereof, and may be attac-hed to a hook 45 of a lifting device 47, such as la crane or hoist, at a point disposed above the center of the frame 35. The frame 35 is so constructed and arranged that each center of intersection of the side members 37 with the end members 39 is disposed vertically above the corresponding opening 29 in the bottom Wall 3 when the frame 35 is aligned with the crypt 1.

Rods 49 slide freely through openings 59 formed in each corner of the frame 35, Each rod is provided at the lower end thereof with a T-shaped head 51 adapted to pass through an opening 29, and thereafter to be manually rotated 9() degrees and then raised to be received in a recess 33. The end members 39 of the frame 35 are rigidly secured to the upper surface of the side members 37, as by welding. The openings 5i) through which the rods 49 slide are formed at the center of intersection of the side members 37 and the end members 39. Notches 53 are formed in the upper surface of end members 39, extending from the openings 59 to the inner edge 55 thereof, while a second set of notches 57 are formed in the upper surface of end members 39 at right angles to notches 53 and extend from the openings 50 to the adjacent ends 59 of said members.

The upper end of each rod 49 has a foot portion 61, which is adapted to be received in either one of the notches 53 and 57. The foot portion 61 of each rod 49 extends laterally therefrom in the same direction asVV one end of the head 51 on the lower end of the rod. Thus, when the rods 49 are in the lower-most position with foot portions 61 disposed in notches 53 or 57, th rods will be held against rotation. However, when the rods 49 are raised relative to the frame 35 so that their foot portions 61 are disposed above the notches 53 or 57, they can be freely rotated.

Normally, the crypts 1 are delivered to the installation site on a truck (not shown), with their bottom wall 3 resting upon suitable rails to space the same from the truck oor. The truck preferably carries a hoist with which the lifting device 47 is associated. In order to remove a crypt from the truck, the frame 35 is positioned above the crypt by the lifting device 47, with the heads 51 of the rods 49 aligned with the openings 29 in the bottom of the crypt, and with the foot portions 61 disposed in the notches 53. The frame 35 is then lowered until the heads 51 pass through the openings 29. By lowering frame 35 a small addditional distance the heads 51 of the rods 49 will engage the truck floor and the rods 49 are thereby freed relative to the frame 35 by having their foot portions 61 disposed above and clear of the notches 53. The rods 49 are then manually rd@3 tated degrees to align the heads 51 with the depresa sions 33 formed in the lower surface of the bottom 3. The frame 35 is then lifted to set the heads 51 in the depressions 33 and to set the foot portions 61 in the` notches 57. This secures the rods 49 against rotation at both ends thereof so that the crypts 1 can be safely handled and successively transferred by the hoist mechanisrn 47 from the truck and lowered into a grave open= ing large enough to receive any desired number of crypts, or lowered onto a pre-leveled site of the character de= scribed hereinafter. l

As an alternative construction, the bottom wall 3 of the crypt 1 may be provided with a circular recess 75, FIGS. l0 and 1l, disposed below the depression 33. The depth of the recess '75 is greater than the diameter of the head portion 51 and the diameter of each recess is greater than the length of said head, so that the head i's free td rotate in said recess. The advantage of this construcf= tion is that the crypts may rest directly upon a Hoor sur= face and the rods 49 lowered until their heads 51 are at a point below the depressions 33, without having any rails between the crypt and the floor. The rods 49 cari then be rotated and -raised to position the heads 51 in the depressions 33, as previously described.

In order to make the mosteicient use of cemetery areas for interment purposes, the crypts 1 are positioned in a group in contiguous relationship, that is, side-by' side and end-to-end, with a minimum of space between the crypts. As a preliminary step of the present method, the area of ground Where the crypts are to be ini stalled is leveled, and a layer of gravel, crushed stone, or other granular material 63 is spread evenly on the leveled area. The layer of granular material 63 is preferably about six inches deep, in order to afford adequate drainage. Parallel rows of support members 65 are embedded in the granular material 63 with the upper edges thereof lying in substantially the same plane as the upper surface of said material. The rows are spaced so that at least two, and preferably three, support members 65 are disposed transversely beneath each crypt, as shown in FIG. 4. The support member 65 may be formed of wood, metal or any other suitable material. The support members 65 are desirable, but may be omitted for economic reasons, in which event the granular material can be more easily and quickly compacted, which is done in either event to provide a solid foundation for the crypts.

As is best illustrated in FlGS. l, 2 and 4, a group of crypts 1 is arranged in contiguous relationship with a slight spacing of about l inch between the walls thereof to provide for drainage. The area occupied by the crypts sassari S may be of any size, up to and including several acres. After the crypts 1 have been arranged in the manner described, panels 19 are installed in each compartment A and B of each crypt. The cover slabs Z5 are then seated on the upper edge of the walls 5, 7, 9 and 11 and on the partition 13 `to close the crypts. All of the joints around the outside edges of the slabs 25 of each crypt, and the V-shaped grooves formed between adjacent slabs are temporarily sealed with mortar or other suitable material 32. Several layers of moisture-proof sheet material 67, such as tar paper, or the like, are then spread over the tops of all of the crypts, with all overlapping joints between the sheet material sealed to prevent moisture passing through.

Soil from the area surrounding the group of crypts is bulldozed up against the side walls of the outermost crypts 1 to cover the same, and additional soil 69 is deposited, in a l-ayer about two feet thick on top of the crypts 1, with the result that the prepared burial area `takes the form of a mound, as shown in FIG. 2.

When it is desired thereafter to deposit a casket in any empty section of a crypt, the earth 69 above such section is removed, the tar paper layers 67 are cut and folded back to afford access to the slabs 25 covering said section, the sealing material 32 is removed from the joints of the cover slabs, and the slabs are removed and set aside. ln the event that the casket is to be deposited in the lower section, the panels 19 thereof are also removed. The casket is then lowered into place and the panels 19 are then reassembled in the crypt. The slabs 25 are replaced to close the crypt, the joints between said slabs are again sealed by mortar 32, and the tar paper 67 is folded back in place over the slabs Z5 and resealed at the edges thereof before redepositing the -removed earth on the crypt.

It will thus be seen that by installing in the ground a group of crypts of the type disclosed herein, `a great many more interments can be made in any given area than has been possible heretofore. It is also obvious that crypts containing more than two compartments, or which are constructed in such a manner as to provide more than two vertically disposed sections, can be provided without departing from the principles of the present invention.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention is disclosed herein, such alterations, modifications or changes as may occur to those skilled in the art are intended to be included within lthe scope of this invention, as defined in the appended claims.

l claim:

1. A concrete burial crypt, comprising:

(a) a hollow body having `a substantially rectangular casket-receiving compartment and including,

(b) a lbottom wall having a plurality of elongated -openings extending therethrough,

(c) said bottom wall also having a plurality of elongated depressions in the undersurface thereof extending thereinlto and respective-ly intersecting approximately imidway of and at .right angles with a different one of said elongated openings, said elongated depressions being of substantially the same length as said elongated openings, whereby rods with T-shaped Iheads can be inserted into the upper end of .and Ithrough said openings and rotated to register their heads with said depressions to provide locked means for lifting the crypt.

2. A burial crypt 4as defined in claim i, wherein:

(a) one of `the longated openings is located adjacent each corner of the bottom wall.

3. A concrete burial crypt, comprising:

(a) a hollow body having a substantially rectangular casket compartment and including,

(b) a bottom wall having a plurality of elongated openings extending therethrough,

(c) said bottom wall also having a plurality of recesses in the undersurface thereof extending thereinto and respectively registering with a. different one of the elongated openings,

(d) said bottom wall also having an elongated depression in the undersurface thereof extending thereinto from each of said recesses,

(e) said depressions being disposed in intersecting relation with each of said elongated openings.

4. A burial crypt as defined in claim 3, wherein:

(a) the recesses are circular and of :a diameter not less than the length of their associated elongated openings; and wherein (b) the overall length of each elongated opening is about equal to the overall length of its associated depression.

5. A burial crypt las defined in claim 3, wherein:

(a) a portion of the depressions vis disposed on opposite sides of each of the elongated openin gs.

6. A burial crypt as defined inclaim 3, wherein:

(a) the recesses are circular and of a diameter not less than the length of their associated elongated openings.

7. A burial crypt as defined in claim 3, wherein:

(a) the overall length of each elongated opening is about equal to 4the overall length of its associated depression.

8. A burial crypt as defined in claim 7, wherein:

(a) the elongated openings and the depressions intersect at substantially a right angle.

9. A precast concrete burial crypt, comprising:

(a) a body defined by opposed side walls, opposed end walls, and a bottom wall;

(b) a vertical partition disposed midway between said side walls extending upwardly from said bottom wall to the top of said end walls and merging at its opposite ends with said end walls and dividing said body into two parallel compartments,

(c) said bottom wall having a pair of elongated handling openings extending therethrough `in each of said compartments,

(d) said bottom wall also having depressions in the undersurface thereof extending thereinito and respec* tively intersecting with -a different one of said openmgs,

(e) each of said side Walls having a horizontally extending recess in the inner side thereof extending from one end wall to the other end Wall.,

(f) said partition having a horizontal recess in each side thereof, extending from one end wall to the other end Wall,

(g) each of said recesses having a bottom ledge,

(h) all of said bottom ledges being disposed in a common lplane parallel with said bottom wall and being located substantially midway `between the bottom wall and the top edge of said side Walls and said partition;

(i) la series of flat concrete panels disposed in side-byside relationship with their ends resting upon the ledges of confronting recesses and extending from one wall to the other end wall in each compartment, thereby dividing each of said compartments into upper and lower sections; and

(j) two series of concrete slabs, each having its slabs disposed in side-byside relationship and resting upon the top of one said side wall, said partition, and said end walls, and forming independently removable closures for each of said compartments.

10. A precast concrete burial crypt, comprising:

(a) a body having a casket-receiving compartment defined by opposed side walls, opposed end Wal-ls and `a bottom wall,

(b) each of said side walls having a horizontally extending recess in the inner side thereof extending from one end wall to the other end wall,

(c) each of said recesses having a bottom ledge,

(d) all of said Ibottom ledges being disposed in a common plane parallel with the bottom wall and being located substantially midway between the bottom wall and the top edge of said -side walls,

(e) said bottom wall having a plurality of elongated handling openings extending therethrough,

(f) said bottom wall also having a plurality of elongated depressions in the undersurface thereof extending thereinto `and respectively intersecting with a different -one yof said elongated openings, said elongated depressions being `0f subst-antially the same length as said elongated openings, whereby rods with T-shaped heads can be inserted into the upper end of and through said openings and rotated to register their heads with said depressions to provide locked means for lifting the crypt,

(g) a series of at concrete panels disposed in sideebyside relationship with their ends resting upon the ledges of said recesses `and extending from one end wall to `the other end Wall of said compartment, thereby dividing said compartment into upper and lower sections; and

(h) a series of concrete slabs disposed in side-by-side relationship and resting upon the top of said side walls and end walls and forming a closure for said compartment.

UNITED References Cited by the Examiner STATES PATENTS Haase 52-125 Flath 52-227 Starret 52-169 Turner 52-131 Blasius et al. 52137 OTHER REFERENCES France. France. France. France. France. Germany. Great Britain. Great Britain.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3722155 *Nov 9, 1970Mar 27, 1973L GlockCemetery covered by an artificial turf material
US3938287 *Dec 19, 1974Feb 17, 1976Fernand GauchardMausoleum
US3958378 *Oct 22, 1974May 25, 1975Gerardo OmeechevarriaBurial crypt
US4134239 *Apr 19, 1977Jan 16, 1979Obonaga Calle Tulio EBurial field and method of constructing same
US4604839 *May 3, 1984Aug 12, 1986Esposito John MTransportable mausoleum assembly
US4648219 *May 16, 1984Mar 10, 1987Memorial Management And Marketing Concepts, Inc.Lawn crypt
US6105315 *Jul 24, 1998Aug 22, 2000Stoecklein; Walter J.Modular mausoleum and crypt structure and methods of constructing same
US6370745 *Jan 21, 1997Apr 16, 2002Rockhampton City CouncilCrypt system
US7047605Dec 27, 2001May 23, 2006Rockhampton City CouncilMethod and apparatus for lifting crypt lids
US7337585Jan 4, 2005Mar 4, 2008Gary M. BobbittLawn crypt covering system and method
US7530149Dec 28, 2007May 12, 2009Gary BobbittLawn crypt covering system and method
US7637061 *Mar 13, 2008Dec 29, 2009Plinths And Caissons, LlcGrave marker grid support system
US8006355May 12, 2009Aug 30, 2011Gary M. BobbitLawn crypt covering system and method
US8161694 *Jan 27, 2011Apr 24, 2012Frost Lawrence EBurial crypt for cremains and method of fabrication
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/124.1, 52/741.12, 52/169.6, D25/36, 52/137, 52/169.14
International ClassificationE04H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H13/001, E04H13/00
European ClassificationE04H13/00A, E04H13/00