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Publication numberUS3295458 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1967
Filing dateAug 13, 1964
Priority dateAug 13, 1964
Publication numberUS 3295458 A, US 3295458A, US-A-3295458, US3295458 A, US3295458A
InventorsSteffes Adam P G
Original AssigneeSteffes Adam P G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 3295458 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1967 A, P. G. STEFFES PUMP W Em M Filed Aug. 15, 1964 United States Patent O 3,295,458 PUMP Adam P. GQStelfes, 707 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif. 90012 Filed Aug. 13, 1964, Ser. No. 389,395 2 Claims. (Cl. 103-150) This invention relates to -an improved pump.

It is an object of this invention to provide a pump suitable for moving liquids or gases wherein the material being moved is sealed olf from the operative parts of the pump.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide a diaphragm-type pump wherein all of the moving parts are isolated from the liquid or gas being pumped whereby impurities cannot cause damage to the moving parts of the pump and wherein any possible contamination of liquid being pumped is eliminated.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide novel means for equally distributing pressure on the diaphragm during the pumping operation.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a high pressure piston pump without the necessity of vtight tolerances, which cause lubrication problems.

Other objects 'and `advantages of the invention will be readily apparent in the description.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is an elevation in section of a pump embodying this invention.

FIGURE 2 is a view taken along line 2 2 of FIG- URE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a perspective of the piston member.

FIGURE. 4 is a perspective ofthe spider.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary view similai to FIGURE 1 illustrating the pump in the fully extended position.

FIGURE 6 is -a view similar to FIGURE '5 illustrating a pump in the fully withdrawn position.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary perspective of the 4ring and its seal.

This invention :relates to an improvement on the pump illustrated and described in my prior Patent No. 2,952,218 and relates specifically to the operating mechanism for said pump. The pump is designed to utilize compressed air or a uid under pressure as the force actuating the piston, which in turn pumps or moves other lluids or gases, either as a pump or as a means corresponding to the moving cylinder in a hydraulic brake system.

A cylindrical casing 10 is open at both ends and has a flexible diaphragm 12 xed at both ends by means of having the periphery of each diaphragm clamped between outwardly projecting flange 14 on -said casing 1and a matching outwardly projecting llange 16 on a cylinder head 18, which anges are secured together by bolts 20. Each cylinder head is provided with an inlet 22 and an outlet 23. Positioned within the casing 10 is a piston member 24 which is open at each end as at 26 and has a series of threaded holes 28 which receive screws 30 which in turn pass through plate 32, thereby clamping the center portion of each diaphragm 12 to an end of piston 24.

At both the upper and lower extremities of the piston, a ring element 34 is provided having a concave upper surface 36 which receives a portion of the diaphragm 12. A driving mechanism for said Irings is provided comprising a spider 37 which surrounds piston 24 and has its upper and lower extremities inserted into a sealing member 38, which Patented Jan. 3, 1967 in turn abuts one of rings 34. The ends of the spider are attached to the ring element 34 by means of screws 39 or by other suitable means. i

The piston and spider are each provided with corresponding racks 40 and 42 which 'are aligned in parallel relationship. Any number of racks may be used and yfour are illustrated. Shafts 44 project inwardly through the casing 12 and each -ca-rries a sleeve 45 journalled on said shaft and upon which connected pinions 46 and 48 are formed, which mesh with racks 42 and 40 respectively. The distance between the wall of casing 10 and the piston 24 should be approximately three times the thickness of the diaphragm material, and pinion 48 is twice the size of pinion 46 so that upon movement of the diaphragm in either direction, the spider 37 and hence ring 36 move at one half `the rate of movement of the piston 24, thereby accommodating the distortion of the diaphragm upon movement of the piston and thereby maintaining a continuous pressure on every part of the diaphragm by the lluid within the casing. A support member 49 lits Within piston 24 through which shafts 44 pass.

In operation, compressed air may be inserted through, for example, the top inlet 22 forcing the piston 24 downwardly in FIGURE l, the rack 40 on said piston meshing with and rotating pinion 48 and at the same time pinion 46. Pinion 46 meshes with the rack 42 causing the spider 37 to also move downwardly at onehalf the rate of the piston whereby tlluid or gas in the lower cylinder head [18 is evacuated through outlet 23. Ultimately, the pump reaches the position of FIGURE 6. When the air or other pressure in the upper cylinder head I18 is evacuated through its outlet 2-3, the piston will be forced upwardly to its starting position by the following means, depending upon the use to which the pump is put. If used as an ordinary pump, with both lower inlet 22 and outlet 23, a spring lS0 can be affixed between the lower cylinder head 128 and the lower piston head 32. When used to move a fluid or gas under pressure in a closed circuit (with only one combined inlet and outlet), upon the release of the :pressure in the upper cylinder, the pressure exerted by the Huid or gas in the lower cylinder head 18 will force the piston upwardly in FIGURE vl until a position illustrated in FIGURE 5 is assumed, with t-he uppermost plate 32 striking the -top of the upper cylinder head |18. Thus, by alternately applying and releasing pressure in the upper cylinder head, the pump is caused to operate.

While what ahereinbefore has ybeen described as the preferred embodiment of this invention, it is readily apparent that alterations and modifications may be resorted -to without departing from the scope of this invention and such alterations and modifications are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a pump having a casing, a flexible diaphragm mounted within said casing, a piston Within said casing engaging said diaphragm, a ring surrounding said piston and lilling the space between said piston and said casing and engaging said diaphragm, the combination of means forming a rack on said piston, a spider abutting said ring and positioned between said casing and piston, means forming a second rack on said spider, pinions meshing with said racks and mounted for rotation upon said casing, said casing having an inlet and an outlet on the 0pposite side of said diaphragm from said piston, and a shaft journalled in said casing and projecting through said piston and spider supporting said pinions.

2. In a pump having a casing, a flexible diaphragm mounted within said casing, a piston within said casing engaging said diaphragm, a ring surrounding said piston and lling the space between said piston and said Casin-g and engaging said diaphragm, the combination of: means forming a rack on said piston, a spider abutting said ring and positioned between said casing and piston, means forming a second rack on said spider, pinions meshing with said racks and mounted vfor rotation upon said casing, said casing having an inlet and an outlet on the opposite side of said diaphragm from said piston, and a support member provided within said spider, shafts journalled in said casing and projecting through said piston, spider and support member and supporting said pinions.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,006,843 10/ 1911 Gerhard 103-158 2,692,618 10/ 1954 Ludowici 92-98 2,952,218 9/1960 Steffes 103-152 2,953,166 9/ 1960 Carlson 92-98 10 MARK NEWMAN, Primary Examiner.

W. L. FREI-EH, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1006843 *Jun 27, 1911Oct 24, 1911Karl F GerhardPump.
US2692618 *Sep 19, 1951Oct 26, 1954Wilhelm Ludowici JohannDiaphragmed piston and cylinder construction
US2952218 *Sep 9, 1958Sep 13, 1960Steffes Adam P GPump
US2953166 *Nov 22, 1957Sep 20, 1960Honeywell Regulator CoDiaphragm support
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4382753 *Sep 10, 1980May 10, 1983Avi, Inc.Nonpulsating IV pump and disposable pump chamber
US4391600 *Sep 15, 1980Jul 5, 1983Avi, Inc.Nonpulsating IV pump and disposable pump chamber
US4410322 *Sep 10, 1980Oct 18, 1983Avi, Inc.Nonpulsating TV pump and disposable pump chamber
US4857048 *Mar 21, 1988Aug 15, 1989Hewlett-Packard CompanyIV pump and disposable flow chamber with flow control
US5174118 *Dec 6, 1991Dec 29, 1992Max PolskyFluid pressure-responsive unit
US5320503 *Sep 23, 1993Jun 14, 1994Patient Solutions Inc.Infusion device with disposable elements
US5584667 *Jun 6, 1995Dec 17, 1996Davis; David L.Method of providing uniform flow from an infusion device
US5803712 *Feb 14, 1995Sep 8, 1998Patient Solutions, Inc.Method of measuring an occlusion in an infusion device with disposable elements
US6146109 *Jun 29, 1998Nov 14, 2000Alaris Medical Systems, Inc.Infusion device with disposable elements
US6312227Mar 30, 1993Nov 6, 2001I-Flow Corp.Infusion device with disposable elements
US6742992Nov 7, 2002Jun 1, 2004I-Flow CorporationInfusion device with disposable elements
EP0188730A2 *Dec 11, 1985Jul 30, 1986LEWA Herbert Ott GmbH + Co.Diaphragm pump with a hydraulically actuated rolling membrane
Classifications
U.S. Classification92/99, 417/395, 92/52, 92/97, 92/98.00D
International ClassificationF04B43/00, F04B39/04, F04B9/00, F04B9/127
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/0054, F04B9/127, F04B39/044
European ClassificationF04B9/127, F04B43/00D8, F04B39/04B4