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Publication numberUS3295810 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1967
Filing dateMar 3, 1965
Priority dateMar 3, 1965
Publication numberUS 3295810 A, US 3295810A, US-A-3295810, US3295810 A, US3295810A
InventorsKintish Irving L
Original AssigneeKintish Irving L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Article attaching means
US 3295810 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ART I CLE ATTACHING MEANS I Filed March 5, 1965 i2 IO lo l2 '5 INVENTOR.

lRViNG L. TISH United States Patent O 3,295,810 ARTICLE A'ITACHING MEANS Irving L. Kintish, Rockaway, NJ., assigner to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army Filed Mar. 3, 1965, Ser. No. 436,970 2 Claims. (Cl. 248-206) The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government for governmental purposes without the payment to me of any royalty thereon.

This invention relates to a method and means for fastening a relatively small article to another object or surface, and particularly to a method and means for fastening which includes a tape having a suction cup fastening side.

Formerly, small articles were fastened to other objects or supporting surfaces by means of adhesive tapes, ropes, waxy resins and the like. These means proved inadequate in many applications. For example, when installing a small explosive charge to an underwater supporting surface the above mentioned expressed means could not conveniently perform the desired fastening function. Commonly known adhesive tapes would not hold underwater; ropes were too cumbersome and limited in application and waxy resins were too bulky. The latter two objections apply also to fastening articles together or to a supporting surface in the atmosphere.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a method and means for fastening small articles to another object or surface, which method and means provide superior fastening under all ordinary environmental conditions.

A further object of this invention is to provide a fastening tape consisting of a resilient iiexible and impervious material having a plurality of integrally formed suction cup-like indentations formed on one side of the tape, the suction cups being of suiicient size and number, and in spaced relationship to each other to provide a superior suction fastening surface.

These objects and other advantages will become apthe drawings in which:

FIGS. l and 2 are enlarged diagrammatic planar views of portions of tapes-of this invention;

FIG. 3 is a View taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a view of FIG. 3 showing a backing on the inventive tape, which backing is readily removable from the tape and allows the inventive tape to be formed int-o a roll for convenient transportation;

FIG. 5 shows a typical application of the invention.

In accordance with this invention and refer-ring to the drawings Where like reference numerals relate to like parts throughout, represents the tape composed of a resilient flexible material which is impervious to air or water typical of such a material is vinyl, silicone rubber, or other elastomers. The width and thickness of the tape 10 may vary as desired. However, the thickness must be greater than the diameter of the suction cup indentations 12 which are integral with the tape. The suction cup indentations 12 are preferably distributed substantially uniformly throughout the tape so that they are uniformly spaced from each other. As shown in FIG. 1 the indentations are arranged in a staggered pattern and in FIG. 2

in a substantially straight pattern. The suction cup indentations 12 have the characteristic of producing a partial vacuum when applied to a surface.

The spacing of the suction cup indentations 12 is very 5 important since under compression there is a spreading of the cup. For example, if the suction cup indentations 12 are 1A inch in diameter the distances between indentations should be no less than 1A inch. The thickness of the tape 10, in this example, should be i716 inch or more to 10 insure durability of the tape. Like considerations must be taken into account when the indentations are increased or decreased in dimensions.

As shown in FIG. 4 a thin backing 14 can be placed over the face of the tape and coextensive therewith. The 15 use of this backing 14 will permit the tape 10 to be rolled into a coil facilitating transportation, and would also act to preclude foreign matter from entering into the indentation area. The backing 14 could consist of a thin plastic or tightly woven cloth attached to the face of the tape with a small amount of suitable adhesive. The backing should be capable of being easily removed from the face of the tape.

The method of using this inventive tape with a small article for fastening same to another object or supporting surface is illustrated in FIG. 5. FIG. 5 shows a small article 16 fastened to a piece of wood 18 in a water environment. Typical of this illustration, the small article 16 could be a mass of explosive material while the wood 18 could be a support column of a pier to be destroyed. A diver would sever a suitable length of tape 10 from a roll thereof, place the explosive against the support column and press the mid-portion of the length of tape over a relatively liat portion of the explosive. This will thus fix the tape to the explosive by creation of a vacuum between the indentations 12 and the body of the explosive article 16. The end portion of the tape 10 will then be pressed against the surface of the support column fixing the tape t-o the column by a vacuum between the indentations and the surface of the column. The explosive article 16 is now fastened to the column and ready to be appropriately used. This method as can be readily understood, is very simple and can be quickly applied. This inventive tape is not limited to use in water -but can be used as illustrated above in any ordinary environment i.e. water,

air, gas, etc.

I claim:

1. In an underwater demolition arrangement having an explosive charge secured to a support member submerged in water,

a waterproof, resilient tape having a central portion secured to said charge and its end portions secured to said member, said tape having one side substantially covered with an adhering surface, said surface having substantially throughout its length a plurality of spaced cup-like recesses defining vacuum containing indentations in said surface secured against said charge and said member.

2. `In an underwater demolition arrangement having an explosive charge secured to a support member submerged in water,

a waterproof, resilient tape having a central portion secured to said charge and its end portions secured to said member, said tape having one side substantially covered with an adhesive material surface, said adhesive surface having substantially throughout its length a plurality of spaced cup-like recesses defining vacuum containing indentations in said adhesive surface secured against said charge and said member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2/1936 Carpenter 24-67 1/1941 Groff 248-206 CLAUDE A. LE ROY, Primary Examiner.

I. F. FOSS, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2030135 *Nov 1, 1932Feb 11, 1936Ad Here Paper CompanyAdhesive unit
US2227541 *Apr 8, 1938Jan 7, 1941Groff Frank JVacuum tape
US2557434 *Jul 25, 1949Jun 19, 1951Hoverder Wallace PSupporting fixture
US2608250 *Aug 28, 1950Aug 26, 1952Richard R MeyerRetaining attachment for shower curtains
US2625378 *Mar 25, 1950Jan 13, 1953Gen ElectricHeat transfer assembly
US2722978 *Oct 15, 1952Nov 8, 1955Erik E FriskScreen window for vehicles
US2843421 *Feb 23, 1955Jul 15, 1958Nancy E SheltonAutomobile windshield awning
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3503577 *Apr 30, 1968Mar 31, 1970Structural FibersBase for supporting machinery
US3558093 *Jul 29, 1969Jan 26, 1971Epec Systems CorpVacuum memory holding device
US3632074 *Apr 10, 1968Jan 4, 1972Western Electric CoReleasable mounting and method of placing an oriented array of devices on the mounting
US5052320 *Jun 25, 1990Oct 1, 1991Cremer David FEmergency tiller for outboard motors
US5960933 *Jun 23, 1997Oct 5, 1999Tetra Laval Holdings & Finance, SaConveyor belt for non-slip material handling
EP0091350A1 *Mar 25, 1983Oct 12, 1983COMMISSARIAT A L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE Etablissement de Caractère Scientifique Technique et IndustrielRemotely manipulable device for cutting plates and tubes in dangerous surroundings
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/206.4, 102/406, 248/363, 248/362, 102/301
International ClassificationF42B3/093, F42D3/00, F42B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42D3/00, F42B3/093
European ClassificationF42B3/093, F42D3/00