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Publication numberUS3297025 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1967
Filing dateJun 16, 1964
Priority dateJun 16, 1964
Publication numberUS 3297025 A, US 3297025A, US-A-3297025, US3297025 A, US3297025A
InventorsCandido Jacuzzi
Original AssigneeJacuzzi Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydrotherapy tub
US 3297025 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 10, 1967 c. JACUZZI 3,297,025

HYDROTHERAPY TUB Filed June 16, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. CANDIDO JACUZZ/ ATTORNE Y5 Jan. 10, 1967 c. JAcuzzl HYDROTHERAPY TUB Filed June 16, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. ("AND/D0 JACUZZ/ ATTORNEYS Jan. 10, 1967 c. JACUZZI HYDROTHEHAPY TUB 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 16, 1964 F I E:- S

INVENTOR. CAND/DO JACUZZ/ A TTORNEYS United States Patent Ofiice 3,29'Ld25 Patented Jan. it), 1967 3,2S37,t)25 HYDROTHERAPY TUB (Jandido .liacuzzi, Lafayette, Calif., assignor to Jacuzzi Bron, the, Richmond, Calif., a corporation of (Jalifornia Filed June 16, 1964, Sex. No. 375,474 13 Qlaims. (Cl. l28-66) This invention relates to hydrotherapy equipment and is more particularly directed to a hydrotherapy bathtub having this equipment incorporated thereinto and the speciflc structure of the equipment, including the injection nozzles thereof. The invention is especially concerned with the provision of a hydrotherapy bathtub wherein the therapeutic action of the tub is uniform throughout its area.

In the past various forms of hydrotherapy units have been provided for use either in bathtubs of relatively conventional character or in specifically designed therapeutic tubs. These units had the common characteristic that they were inserted into the tub as an addendum thereto and, thus, stood off from the interior surface of the tub in some manner. As so inserted into the tubs, these prior units generally took the form of protrusions extending from the sidewalls of the tubs, or of artificial floors positioned above the tub floor. When positioned in either of these ways, the units had the disadvantage that they generally posed somewhat of a hazard to the user of the tub and that their removal was required for effective cleaning. Floor-positioned units also had the disadvantage that their therapeutic action was, of necessity, from one direction. In addition to the hazard posed by the prior art units, the addendum character of these units made them subject to damage from exterior impact and generally unsightly from an aesthetic viewpoint. Addendum type therapeutic units also typically had the disadvantage that the electrical driving means therefor were incorporated into the units, and thus presented an electrical hazard to the user of the tub.

it is, accordingly, a principal object of this invention to provide a hydrotherapy system built into a bathtub which overcomes the above-enumerated disadvantages of the prior art.

Another and more specific object of the invention is to provide a hydrotherapy system permanently installed in a bathtub and having a plurality of waterair injection nozzles located in the walls of the bathtub at spaced locations therearound whereby fluid circulation and resultant hydrotherapy action throughout the bathtub is assured,

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a hydrotherapy bathtub with fluid injection nozzles mounted therein so as to ensure that said nozzles will not be activated before the water in the bathtub has reached a level thereabove and wherein the pump of the hydrotherapy system used with the bathtub is self-priming when the water has reached this level.

A further object of the invention is to provide hydrotherapy injection nozzles adapted to be sealingly received in openings in the wall of a bathtub so as to be readily adjustable as to both the direction in which a water-air mixture is injected therethrough the mixing ratio of this mixture.

With respect to the adjustable characteristics of the nozzles of the present invention, it is still another object of the invention to provide means whereby this adjustment may be readily effected by the user of the bathtub.

Broadly stated, the objects of the subject invention are accomplished in a bathtub defined by a dish-shaped wall and having a drain conduit opening through the lower extremity of said wall and an overflow conduit opening through said wall adjacent theupper extremity thereof. The overflow conduit extends into a connection in fluid communication with said drain conduit and stop means is disposed in the latter conduit to selectively close it up stream of the overflow conduit connection therewith. The improved hydrotherapy system to which the invention is primarily directed is incorporated into the bathtub and comprises a plurality of water-air injection nozzles sealingly received in spaced openings formed through the wall of the bathtub at a level below the level at which the overflow conduit opens through said wall. Each of the latter nozzles is provided with an air and a water inlet. The system further includes a pump and driving motor therefor mounted exteriorly of the bathtub, said pump having a vacuum inlet and pressure outlet, and an inlet conduit extending in communication between the interior of the bathtub and the vacuum inlet of the pump. Water and air, respectively, are supplied to the injection nozzles by a first fluid manifold extending into communication between the pressure outlet of the pump and the water inlet of each of said nozzles and a second fluid manifold extending in fluid communication between the air inlets in each of said nozzles and the overflow conduit.

In its more specific aspects, the subject invention includes a hydrotherapy nozzle assembly adapted to be mounted in an opening in the wall of a bathtub. The assembly comprises a hollow housing having an open forward end with a periphery adapted to sealingly engage an opening in the bathtub wall and a closed rearward end with water and air conduits extending thereinto. A fluid guiding element is received in the rearward end of said housing and has formed therein separate water and air passages communicating with the respective water and air conduits in the hollow housing. Further included in the assembly is a tubular nozzle having its rearward end sealingly secured to said fluid guiding element and the open forward end thereof extending through the housing to close proximity with the forward edge thereof. The rearward end of the nozzle is in fluid communication with the passageways in the fluid guiding element and. the assembly is completed by means operatively associated with the guiding element to control the ratio of water to air introduced into the nozzle from said element.

The foregoing and other objects of the invention and the detailed structure thereof will become more apparent when viewed in light of the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates a plan view, partially in section, of the bathtub of the subject invention and the hydrotherapy system cooperating therewith;

FIG. 2 is a vertical section taken on line 2-2 of FIG. 1 illustrating one form of water-air injection nozzle of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a vertical section taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are vertical sections illustrating alternative water-air injection nozzles of the subject invention;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are views of the FIG. 5 nozzle taken on line 66 and line 77 of FIGS. 5 and 6, respectively;

FIG. 8 is a vertical section illustrating yet another water-air injection nozzle of the invention; and

FIG. 9 is a vertical section taken on line 99 of FIG. 8.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 3, therein is illustrated the bathtub, designated in its entirety by the numeral 10, to which the invention is primarily directed. The bathtub It) may be fabricated of any suitable material, such as steel, cast iron, or fiberglass, and includes a relatively flat peripheral portion 11 and a dish-shaped wall 12, the latter of which defines the tub or tank section of the bathtub. The bathtub 10 is provided with the usual relatively conventional structure including a drain conduit 13 opening through the lower extremity of the wall 12 and an 3 overflow conduit 14 opening through the said wall adjacent the upper extremity thereof. The overflow conduit 14 extends downwardly to a connection 15 in fluid communication with the drain conduit 13. A stop or valve 16 is slidably disposed in the drain conduit 13 and is adapted to close said conduit (as illustrated in FIG. 3) upstream of the overflow conduit connection 15 therewith. The valve 16 has the form of an open cylinder having an operating rod 17 fixed to the lower end thereof and adapted to move it from the closed position illustrated in FIG. 3 to an open position wherein the valve is elevated to a position adjacent the connection 15. The open cylindrical form of the valve 16 assures that flow between the overflow conduit 14 and the drain conduit 13 will not be impeded when the valve is either in the open or closed position. Further included as conventional structure on the bathtub 10 is a mixing faucet 20, one water feed line 21 of which is illustrated in FIG. 3.

The hydrotherapy system to which the present invention is primarily directed includes a plurality of water-air injection nozzle assemblies 22 positioned in openings 23 formed in the upwardly extending portions of the wall 12 below the level at which the overflow conduit 14 opens therethrough. As illustrated in detail in FIG. 2, each of the nozzle assemblies 22 comprises a cylindrical housing 24 formed with an open flanged forward end 25 adapted to be sealingly secured in an opening 23 and a closed rearward end 26 having water and air conduits 27 and 3%, respectively, extending thereinto. Screws 31 extend through the periphery of the forward flanged end 25 and into threaded engagement with the wall 12 to secure the housing 24 to said wall and an escutcheon plate 32 is clampingly held in the housing 24 so as to hide the screws 31 from view. The nozzle assembly 22 further includes a spherically shaped fluid guiding element 33 sealingly retained in the rearward end 26 of the housing by a retainer ring 34 having a spherical inner surface adapted to engage said element and an opening 35 extending through the forward end thereof. The fluid guiding element 33 has formed therein separate water and air passages 36 and 37, respectively, which open through opposed sides thereof and are adapted to be aligned with the conduits 27 and 30. The passages 36 and 37 open through the forward end of the guiding element 33 into a nozzle 40 fixedly secured thereto and extending through the opening 35 and housing 24 to a position in close proximity with the forward edge of said housing.

The nozzle assembly 22 functions to both control the flow of water and air introduced into the bathtub 10 therethrough and to control the direction of this flow. Flow control of air and water is effected by turning the nozzle 40 about its longitudinal axis, thus turning the fluid guiding element 33 and varying the degree to which the passages 36 and 37 are aligned with the conduits 27 and 30, respectively. Directional control of fluid flow through the nozzle assembly is effected by moving the forward end of the nozzle 40 laterally within the housing 24, thus pivoting the spherical fluid guiding element 33 about its center point. It is noted that both flow control and direction control can be readily accomplished from within the tub by the user, since the open end of the housing 24 is easily accessible, and that the nozzle 40 is recessed in the housing to a sufl'icient degree that it presents no protrusion hazard to the user.

Referring again to the bathtub and hydrotherapy system combination illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3, the air intake conduits 3t) communicate with the atmosphere through means of a manifold 41 extending around the wall 12 of the bathtub in communication with each of said conduits and the overflow conduit 14. Thus, air is provided to the nozzles through a manifold system hidden entirely from view and utilizing as an intake port the overflow conduit of the bathtub. It is noted that air under atmospheric pressure is drawn into the air conduits 30 and the manifold 41 and overflow 14 through means of a low pressure area created within the nozzle assembles 22 when water is pumped therethrough. Specifically, when water is pumped from the passage 36 into the nozzle 40, a low pressure area is created at the end of the passage 36 adjacent the air passage 37, thus drawing air into the nozzle 40.

The system for supplying water under pressure to the nozzle assemblies 22 comprises a water manifold 42 extending around the wall 12 in communication between the water conduits 27 of each of the nozzle assemblies and a high pressure conduit 43 leading to the outlet manifold 44 of a pump 45. The pump 45 is located exteriorly of the tub portion defined by the wall 12 and is driven by an electric motor 46 in driving engagement therewith. As

- can be seen from FIG. 3, both the pump 45 and motor 46 are housed beneath a readily removable dome 47 so as to be easily accessible for service operations.

The pump 45 is of the centrifugal type and includes an impeller 50 rotatably received in the manifold 44 and an intake port 51 formed through the manifold at the center of the impeller. Water is supplied to the intake port 51 through an intake manifold 52 communicating therewith and extending into communication with an inlet conduit 53 extending into fluid communication with the lower extremity of the tub defined by the wall 12. Thus, it can be seen that when water is in the bathtub activation of the pump 45 will function to draw a portion of this water from the lower extremity of the tub to the pump and out through the water manifold 42 and the injection nozzle assemblies communicating therewith.

At this point it is noted that centrifugal pumps, such as the pump 45, are generally not self-priming and that it is undesirable to activate the pump unless the nozzle assemblies 22 are submerged. In order to assure that the pump 45 is primed and the nozzle assemblies 22 are submerged prior to activation of the pump, the motor 46 is provided with a float activated switch 54. The switch 54 is mounted on the side of a standpipe 55 sealingly secured in fluid communication with the conduit 53 and extending upwardly therefrom to a level above that of the overflow conduit opening 14 through the wall 12. Thus it can be seen that water in the standpipe 55 will assume a level equal to that in the bathtub 10 and that this level will be limited to the level at which the overflow conduit 14 opens into the bathtub. The switch 54 has extending therefrom and over the standpipe 55 an operating lever 56 which is adapted to close the switch upon being swung upwardly and to open the switch upon being swung downwardly. Movement is imparted to the lever 56 through means of a rod 57 having one end thereof fixedly secured to the lever and the other end thereof fixed to a float 60 loosely received within the standpipe 55. The float 60 is of sufficient weight and buoyancy so that it will open the switch 54 when it is not subject to the buoyancy forces of water within the standpipe and that it will close the switch when it is subject to such forces. Furthermore, the position of the float 69 within the standpipe 55 is so adjusted that it will not close the switch 54 until the water in the bathtub 10 has reached a level sufficient to both prime the pump 45 and cover the injection nozzle assemblies 22. The latter adjustment is facilitated through means of a threaded connection between the lever 56 and rod 57.

Electrical power is supplied to the motor 46 through a first electrical conduit 61 extending between a source of electrical power and the switch 54 and a second electrical conduit 62 extending between the switch 54 and the motor. If desired, a main shutoff switch may be interposed in the first conduit 61 to provide for the turning ofi of the motor 46 when the bathtub 10 is full of water. In the latter case, for the sake of safety, it is preferable that the main switch be so positioned that it cannot be operated by a user standing in the bathtub 10.

To provide for the continuous screening of water drawn into the pump 45, and thus avoid inadvertent damage to the pump by foreign particles, a screen assembly 63 is mounted in the inlet conduit 53 adjacent its connection with the Wall 12. This assembly comprises a tubular housing 64 having external dimensions corresponding closely to the internal dimensions of the conduit 53 so that it may be slidably received therein and includes a screen 65 extending obliquely thereacross. The screen 65 is so positioned in the tubular housing 64 that its entire peripheral edge contacts the housing. Thus, all water flowing through the conduit 53 must pass through the screen 65. The screen assembly 63 is particularly advantageous since the screen 65 used therein has an area considerably larger than the cross sectional area of the in let conduit 53. Furthermore, the assembly is so mounted that it may be readily pulled out of the conduit 53 and into the tub defined by the wall 12 for cleaning purposes Referring now to FIG. 4, therein is illustrated a nozzle assembly 66 adapted to be used in the bathtub 11) as an alternative to the nozzle assemblies 22. The assembly 66 is similar to the assembly 22 in that it includes a tubular housing 67 having an open forward end adapted to be sealingly received in an opening 23 in the bathtub wall and a closed rearward end 70 having water and air conduits 71 and 72, respectively, extending into opposed sides thereof. Although not illustrated, it is to be understood that the forward end of the housing 67 and its connection with an opening 23 in the wall 12 corresponds identically to that described with respect to the nozzle housing 241. The assembly 66 is also similar to the assembly 22 in that it includes a spherical fluid guiding element 73 sealingly held in the closed rearward end 70 by a retainer ring 74 having an opening 75 in the forward end thereof. The fluid guiding element and retainer ring arrangement of assembly 66 diifers from that of assembly 22 in that the element has a slot 76 formed in the lower surface thereof into which a pin 77 formed on the ring 74 extends. The pin 77 is aligned with a vertical diameter passing through the element 73 and is free to slide longitudinally within the slot 75, thus permitting the element 73 to rock within the housing 67 in normal horizontal and vertical planes, while preventing the element from roclo ing about the longitudinal axis of the nozzle assembly.

The element 73 has formed therein water and air passageways 80 and 81, respectively, adapted to communicate with the conduit 71 and conduit 72 and a mandrel 82 having the shape of a truncated cone in the rear Ward end of said water passageway. A tubular nozzle 83 is sealingly received in the element 73 so as to receive both air and water therefrom through means of an O-ring carrying opening 84 formed through the forward end of the passage 31 and adapted to sealingly engage the outer periphery of the nozzle and a threaded opening 85 formed in the forward end of the passage 86 to threadably engage the rearward end of the nozzle. The rearward end of the nozzle 83 is provided with a seat 86 adapted to mate with the mandrel 82 and thus the flow of water from the passageway 86 to the nozzle 83 may be controlled by varying the degree to which the nozzle is threaded into the opening 85. Air is communicated to the nozzle 33 through apertures 87 formed through the section thereof received in the air passage 81. Air under atmospheric pressure is drawn through the apertures 37 by the low pressure area created by the flow of water through the nozzle 83. Thus it can be seen that turning of the nozzle 83 about its longitudinal axis will control both the flow of air and water therethrough. The latter operation, together with the control of direction of flow by pivoting of the element '73, may be readily effected by the user of the bathtub.

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 illustrate another embodiment of nozzle assembly 90 adapted to be used as alternatives to the aforedescribed assembly 22. The assembly 91) differs from the assembly 22 primarily in matters of housing design and in that the flow guiding element 91 thereof is adapted to stop the flow of Water therethrough as well as limit the degree of this flow. From FIG. 5 it can be seen that the assembly 90 includes: a housing 92 having an open forward end and a closed rearward end with water and air conduits 93 and 94, respectively, extending thereinto; a flow guiding element 91 with water and air passageways 95 and 96, respectively, formed therein and sealingly held in the rearward end of the housing by a retainer ring 97; and a nozzle 1110 fixed to and extendirtg forwardly from the element 91 in fluid communication with both the passageways 95 and 96. The flow guiding element 91 is pivotally received in the housing 92 so as to be movable to vary the direction in which the nozzle points and to vary the degree of alignment between the passageways 95 and 96 and the conduits 93 and 94, respectively.

From FIG. 6 it can be seen that the passageways 25 and 96 are separated by Wall 101 having shoes 162 and 1113 formed on the ends thereof and slidably and sealingly engaging the interior surfaces of the rearward end of the housing 92 and the retainer ring 97. The solid line representation of the flow guiding element 91 shows the wall and shoes thereof in a position wherein both the water and air conduits 93 and 94, respectively, are open. The phantom lines represent the element 91 with the shoe 103 closing the conduit Q4 and the shoe 1112 partially closing the conduit 93. From observation of the two positions of the element 91 illustrated in FIG. 6, it is believed apparent that the element could also be turned to a position where both the water and air conduits are completely closed. Thus, rotation of the nozzle about its longitudinal axis functions to partially or completely close the conduits 93 and 94 and lateral movement if the nozzle functions to vary the direction of fluid flow from the nozzle assembly. As with the nozzle assemblies 22 and 66, movement of the nozzle 1% is readily effected by the user of the bathtub 10.

Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, therein is illustrated yet another nozzle assembly 104 adapted to be used in the bathtub 111 as an alternative to the assembly 22. The assembly 104 comprises a hollow housing 105 having an open forward end adapted to be sealingly received in an opening 23 in the bathtub 10 and a closed rearward end having water and air conduits .106 and 1117, respectively, extending thereinto. A flow guiding element 116 is sealingly received in an annular retainer ring 111 pivotally mounted in the rearward end of the housing 105 for pivotal movement about the longitudinal axis of the conduits 106 and 1197. The retainer ring 111 is mounted in the housing 165 through means of a first tubular section 112 extending therefrom into sliding and sealing engagement with the interior of the conduit 106 and a second tubular section 113 extending therefrom into sliding and sealing engagement with the interior of the conduit 107. It is noted that the tubular sections 112 and 113 extend through the walls of the retainer ring 11 1 and thus establish 'fiuid communication between the conduits 106 and .1117 and the interior of the ring.

As can be seen from FIG. 8, the flow guiding element 111) is closed at its rearward portion by a backplate 1:14 and a collar 115 is formed around the forward periphery thereof at a position wherein it will abut against the retainer ring 1111. Sealing engagement between the element 110 and the retainer ring 1 11 is established by O-rings 116 and 117 received in annular grooves 120 and 121, respectively, formed in the outer periphery of the element. Thus, fluid passing into the retainer ring 1211 from the tubular sections 112 and 113 is confined to flow through the flow guiding element 111) and the passage ways therein.

The passageways in the element 110 are similar to those in the aforedescribed element 911 of the assembly 90 and include a water passageway 122 and air passageway 123 separated by a Wall 124 and adapted to be aligned in fluid communication with the first and second tubular sections 112 and 113 leading to the water and air conduits 106 and 107, respectively, in the housing 105. The wall 124 has formed on the ends thereof shoes 125 and 126 slidably and sealingly engaging the walls of the retainer ring 1111. Through the latter provision, turning of the flow guiding element 110 about its axis within the retainer ring 1 11 will function to: selectively open both of the tubular sections 112 and 113; partially close the section 113 while leaving the section 11 2 open; completely close the section 113 while leaving the section 112 open (as illustrated in F-IG..9); or partially or completely close the section 112 while closing the section 1113. In operation the shoes 125 and 126 are intended to close the sections 112 and 113, respectively. Although it would be possible to turn the flow guiding element 110 through 180 so as to reverse the positions of the shoes 125 and 126 with respect to the sections 112 and 113, this turning should preferably be avoided, since it would result in ineffective drawing of air into the element. If desired, such turning can be prevented through the utilization of suitable stops.

The nozzle assembly 104 is completed by a tubular nozzle 127 fixedly secured to the guiding element 110 in fluid communication with the passageways 122 and 123 extending therethrough. The nozzle 12-7 extends through the housing 105 to a point adjacent the opening 23 in the wall 12. Thus, the user of the bathtub can readily turn the nozzle about its longitudinal axis to vary the degree with which the passages 122 and 123 are aligned with the tubular sections 112 and 113, respectively. Furthermore, the end of the nozzle adjacent the opening 23 may also be readily moved horizontally from side to side to vary the direction at which fluid flows from the nozzle and into the bathtub. The latter adjustment is provided for by the pivotal connection between the sections 112 and 113 and the conduits 106 and 107, respectively.

To conclude, from the foregoing detailed description it is believed apparent that the present invention enables the accomplishment of the objects initially set forth herein. In particular, an improved hydrotherapy bathtub with uniform, therapy effect throughout its interior and great flexibility in this effect is provided. It is to be understood, however, that the invention is not intended to be limited to the specific embodiments illustrated and described, but rather is defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a bathtub defined by a dish-shaped wall and having an overflow conduit opening through said wall adjacent the upper extremity thereof,

an improved hydrotherapy system incorporated into the bathtub, comprising:

(a) a plurality of water-air injection nozzles sealingly received in spaced openings formed through the wall of the bathtub at a level below the level at which the overflow conduit opens through said wall, said nozzles having air and water inlets;

(b) a pump and driving motor therefor mounted exteriorly of said bathtub, said pump having a vacuum inlet and pressure outlet;

(c) an inlet conduit extending in fluid communication between the interior of the bathtub below the level at which the overflow conduit opens through the Wall thereof and the vacuum inlet of the pump;

(d) a first fiuid manifold extending in fluid communication between the pressure outlet of the pump and the water inlets of each of the injection nozzles; and,

(e) a second fluid manifold extending in fluid communication between the air inlets in each of said water-air injection nozzles and the overflow conduit.

2. A device according to claim 1, including:

(a) a standpipe in fluid communication with the inlet conduit and extending upwardly therefrom to a level above the level of the water-air injection nozzles;

(b) a float suspended in said standpipe; and,

(c) means operatively associated with said float and the driving motor of the pump to activate said motor when the float reaches a level above the level of the water-air injection nozzles.

3. A device according to claim 2 wherein the vacuum inlet of the pump is below the level of the water-air injection nozzles.

4. A device according to claim 1 including a readily removable screen positioned in the inlet conduit adjacent to the interior of the tub.

5. A device according to claim 4 wherein the screen has an area greater than that of the inlet conduit and is adapted to be positioned therein in oblique relationship wherein all fluid passing through the onduit must pass through the screen.

6. A hydrotherapy nozzle assembly adapted to be mounted in an opening in the wall of a bathtub, said assembly comprising:

(a) a hollow housing having an open forward end with a periphery adapted to sealingly engage an opening in the bathtub wall and a closed rearward end with water and air conduits extending thereinto;

(b) a fluid guiding element received in the rearward end of said first housing and having separate water and air passageways communicating with the respective water and air conduits;

(c) a tubular nozzle having a rearward end sealingly secured to said fluid guiding element and an open forward end extending through said housing to close proximity with the forward end thereof, said rearward end of the nozzle being in fluid communication with the passageways in the fluid guiding element; and,

(d) means operatively associated with said fluid guiding element to control the flow of air and water introduced into said nozzle from said element.

7. A nozzle assembly according to claim 6 wherein the means comprises a valve disposed in the water passageway of the fluid guiding element, said valve being adjustable to control the flow of water through said passageway.

8. A nozzle assembly according to claim 7 wherein the valve comprises:

(a) a mandrel fixed to the fluid guiding element in the water passageway thereof; and,

(b) an annular seat formed on the rearward end of the nozzle and adapted to be moved towards and away from said mandrel to vary the degree of fluid communication between the water passageway in the guiding element and the nozzle.

9. A nozzle assembly according to claim 8 wherein the fluid guiding element is received in the housing for rocking movement therein in normal planes.

10. A nozzle assembly according to claim 6 wherein:

(a) the rearward end of the housing comprises a spherical socket having the water and air conduits extending into opposed sides thereof;

(b) the fluid guiding element comprises a spherical ball sealingly received in said socket and having the water and air passageways opening through opposed sides thereof; and,

(c) the guiding element is rotatable within the housing (l) vary the degree to which the water and air passageways therein are aligned with the respective water and air conduits in the housing, thus providing the means to control the flow of water and air introduced into the nozzle, and

(2) vary the angle at which the nozzle extends from the housing.

11. A nozzle assembly according to laim 6, including:

(a) a cylindrical retainer ring mounted in the rearward end of the housing; and

(b) tubular sections extending through opposed sides of said ring into fluid communication with the water and air circuits extending into the housing; and wherein,

(1) the fluid guiding element comprises a cylinder sealing received in said ring and having the water and air passages opening through opposed sides thereof, and

(2) the guiding element is rotatable within said ring to vary the degree to which the Water and air passageways therein are aligned with the tubular sections communicating with the respective water and air conduits in the housing, thus providing the means to control the flow of water and air introduced into the nozzle.

12. A nozzle assembly according to claim 11 wherein the cylindrical retainer ring is mounted in the housing for rotational movement.

13. A hydrotherapy nozzle assembly adapted to be mounted in an opening in the wall of a bathtub, said assembly comprising:

(a) a hollow housing having an open forward end with a periphery adapted to sealingly engage an opening in the bathtub wall and a closed rearward end with a Water conduit extending thereinto;

(b) a fluid guiding element received in the rearward end of said housing and having a water passageway communicating with said water conduit;

(c) a tubular nozzle having a rearward end sealingly secured to said fluid guiding element and an open forward end extending through said housing, said rearward end of the nozzle being in fluid communication with the water passageway in the fluid guiding element; and

((1) means operatively associated with said fluid guiding element to control the water introduced into said nozzle from said element.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,027,568 4/1962 Blau et al. 12866 X 3,038,469 6/1962 Jacuzzi 12866 FOREIGN PATENTS 485,021 12/ 1917 France.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner. L. W. TRAPP, Assistant Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/157, 4/541.6, 4/541.4, 4/559
International ClassificationA61H33/00, A61H33/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H33/027, A61H33/00
European ClassificationA61H33/00, A61H33/02N
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 8, 1999ASAssignment
Owner name: JACUZZI INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT EFFECTIVE AS OF 6-30-98;ASSIGNOR:JACUZZI INC.( A FORMER DELAWARE CORPORATION);REEL/FRAME:010061/0874
Effective date: 19990225
Mar 30, 1999ASAssignment
Owner name: JACUZZI INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:JACUZZI INC., A FORMER DELAWARE CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:009866/0373
Effective date: 19880402
May 21, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: JACUZZI INC., 11511 NEW BENTON HIGHWAY, LITTLE ROC
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNORS:JACUZZI WHIRLPOOL BATH, INC.;JACUZZI BROS., INC.;REEL/FRAME:003873/0510;SIGNING DATES FROM 19810424 TO 19810508