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Publication numberUS3297456 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1967
Filing dateMay 13, 1966
Priority dateMay 13, 1966
Publication numberUS 3297456 A, US 3297456A, US-A-3297456, US3297456 A, US3297456A
InventorsOwen W Newell
Original AssigneeOwen W Newell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface coating and preserving composition
US 3297456 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,297,456 SURFACE COATING AND PRESERVING COMPOSITION Owen W. Newell, 102 W. Bobe St., Pensacola, Fla. 32501 No Drawing. Filed May 13, 1966, Ser. No. 549,827 3 Claims. (Cl. 106-3) This is a continuation-in-part of application Serial No. 267,886, filed March 21, 1963, now abandoned.

This invention relates generally to cleaning and polishing compositions and more particularly to a composition adapted to clean and polish waxed floors. More specifically, the the present invention relates to a waterlesswaxless floor cleaning, polishing and protecting composition.

Numerous cleaning compositions have been proposed heretofore for the cleansing and polishing of floor surfaces without the necessity of utilizing substantial quantities of water, inasmuch as certain types of flooring materials, i.e., wood, asphalt, vinyl asphalt, etc., and the adhesives utilized to secure the latter are frequently adversely affected by water. Furthermore, most floor maintenance polishing and cleaning compositions proposed heretofore tend to remove substantially all of the previously applied protective coating, such as wax, for example, which may be present on the floor surface being treated. It will be readily apparent that the complete removal of such a protective coating is somewhat less than desirable inasmuch as most flooring materials are characterized by a surface which is micro-porous and thus the complete removal of a protective film often times give rise to problems attendant to the resealing of such pores so as to preclude the embedding of soil therein.

A need therefore exists for a cleaning and polishing composition which requires the utilization of a relatively minor amount of water and furthermore achieves the desired results without completely stripping the existing protective coating to expose the micro-porous surface of the flooring.

It is therefore a primary object of the present invention to provide a relatively waterless cleaning and polishing composition which is adapted for the cleansing and polishing of previously waxed floors and the like.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a waxless cleaning and polishing composition which is adapted to facilitate removal of the soil present on the surface of a waxed floor without completely stripping the protective wax coating so as to insure that the microporous surface of the flooring is not exposed to the accumulation of soil in the interstices thereof.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a waxless floor cleaning and polishing composition comprising a particular proportion of an aqueous solution of lactic acid, methanol, hydrogen peroxide and ammonia which facilitates the maintenance of heavily traveled flooring surfaces over extended periods of time without necessitating frequent waxing thereof.

Briefly, the present invention provides a cleaning and polishing composition comprising an admixture of particular proportions of lactic acid, methanol, hydrogen peroxide and ammonia, preferably aqueous solutions thereof, preferably packaged in a pressurized aerosol type dispenser or spray pump equipped container so as to facilitate application of a small amount of the composition to a flooring surface to be treated. The coaction of the several components comprising the composition has been found to act upon the wax present on the floor to loosen the decayed, or loosely adhering proportion of the wax, and surface soil incorporated therewith, so as to greatly facilitate the removal of this soiled portion of the wax by hand or machine bufiing. Furthermore, it

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has, been found that the coacting components of the composition tend to further coact with the wax remaining on the floor to form a hard, non-slip, film which provides a very brilliant, long-lasting, non-yellowing gloss to the flooring so treated. The portion of the soil laden wax removed may then be collected in a suitable manner such as by sweeping, vacuuming, etc. From the foregoing it will be appreciated that the cleaning and polishing composition of the present invention facilitates the maintenance of flooring surfaces without the necessity of utilizing large quantities of water or relatively strong detergents which tend to strip off all the wax present on a flooring surface.

The following examples are illustrative of waxless' cleaner and polish compositions produced in accordance with the present invention utilizing the components set forth hereinbefore:

Example I Lactic acid (aqueous solution -85%), about 12 oz. liquid;

Methanol (aqueous solution 40-70%), about 6 oz. liquid;

Hydrogen peroxide (aqueous solution 30-50% about 6 oz. liquid; and

Aqua ammonia (aqueous solution 26%), about 3 oz. liquid.

The intimately admixed composition as set forth above is preferably packaged in a pressurized aerosol-type dispenser container with a suitable pressurizing gas such as Freon for example. To utilize the composition for the treatment of flooring surfaces such as of asphalt, tile, wood, etc., having a coating of wax thereon which is soiled, it is merely necessary to spray a light mist of the composition onto the flooring surface. Due to the relatively volatile nature of the composition it readily evaporates, but before doing so acts to loosen the decayed upper portion of the Wax, which generally has incorporated therein the majority of the soil adhering to the floor. It is then merely necessary to lightly buff the treated area such as by hand or with a mechanical bufiing device followed by collection of the loosened soiled wax by means of sweeping, vacuuming or the like.

The flooring treated in this manner is characterized by a hard shiny glaze which greatly enhances the appearance of the floor as well as protecting the floor. Furthermore, it will be noted that the composition does not contain any components which tend to yellow, such as is characteristic of floor cleaning and polishing compositions which contain synthetic or natural waxes. While it is not intended to be restricted by this analysis, it is believed that the coaction of the components comprising the composition is such that in addition to the controlled removal of a portion of the wax the composition also provides a lactic acid-ammonium complex which provides extremely thin hard transparent coating on the remaining wax.

Example II Lactic acid (aqueous solution 80-85%), about 12 oz. liquid;

Methanol (aqueous solution 40-70%), about 6 oz. liquid;

Hydrogen peroxide (aqueous solution 30-50% about 6 oz. liquid; and

Aqua ammonia (aqueous solution 26%), about 4 oz. liquid.

The floor cleaning and polishing composition as set forth above is intended to be utilized by sponging a small amount of the composition on a floor surface to be treated. After the floor being treated has been thoroughly sponged with the composition it is permitted to evaporate and as discussed with regard to the utilization of the composition as set forth in Example I the composition loosens the decayed" wax and the accumulated soil incorporated J therein which may then be collected by suitable means such as sweeping, vacuuming or the like. The composition of Example II is intended to be utilized where a bufiing machine is not available and it will be understood that the sponging of the floor surface tends to assist the composition in dislodging the loosened soil and decayed wax in a manner somewhat analogous to the mechanical action of a buifing machine.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the composition set forth herein satisfies the several objects of this invention whereby the maintenance of previously waxed flooring is greatly facilitated Without the effecting of complete removal of the Wax present on the floor.

The foregoing is considered illustrative only of the principles of the invention and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A floor cleaning and polishing composition which on the basis of volume consists essentially of about 6-12 oz. of an aqueous solution of 80-85% lactic acid, about 6 oz. of an aqueous solution of 40-70% methanol, about 6 oz. of an aqueous solution of 30-50% hydrogen peroxide and about 3-4 oz. of an aqueous solution of about 26% ammonia. I

2. A floor cleaning and polishing composition which on the basis of volume consists essentially of about 6 oz. of an aqueous solution of 80-85% lactic acid, about 6 oz. of an aqueous solution of 40-70% methanol, about 6 oz. of an aqueous solution of -50% hydrogen peroxide and about 3 oz. of an aqueous solution of about 26% ammonia.

3. A floor cleaning and polishing composition which on the basis of volume consists essentially of about 12 oz. of an aqueous solution of 80-85% lactic acid, about 6 oz. of an aqueous solution of -70% methanol, about 6 oz. of an aqueous solution of 30-50% hydrogen peroxide and about 4 oz. of an aqueous solution of about 26% ammonia.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 8/1919 Wallace 106-3 XR 8/1931 Costigan 10611 XR

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1314482 *Mar 8, 1918Aug 26, 1919 Cleaning and polishing composition
US1819736 *Apr 17, 1929Aug 18, 1931Albert R JonesFurniture polish
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5139788 *Aug 17, 1990Aug 18, 1992Ecolab Inc.Noncontaminating antimicrobial composition
US5409713 *Mar 17, 1993Apr 25, 1995Ecolab Inc.Process for inhibition of microbial growth in aqueous transport streams
US5436008 *Aug 5, 1993Jul 25, 1995Ecolab Inc.Sanitizing compositions
US5578134 *Apr 19, 1994Nov 26, 1996Ecolab Inc.Method of sanitizing and destaining tableware
US5674538 *Mar 13, 1995Oct 7, 1997Ecolab Inc.Process for inhibition of microbial growth in aqueous food transport or process streams
US5683724 *Jan 17, 1997Nov 4, 1997Ecolab Inc.Automated process for inhibition of microbial growth in aqueous food transport or process streams
US6071541 *Jun 11, 1999Jun 6, 2000Murad; HowardPharmaceutical compositions and methods for managing skin conditions
US6257253Apr 19, 1994Jul 10, 2001Ecolab Inc.Percarboxylic acid rinse method
US6296880Apr 13, 2000Oct 2, 2001Howard MuradPharmaceutical compositions and methods for managing skin conditions
US6302968May 22, 1995Oct 16, 2001Ecolab Inc.Precarboxylic acid rinse method
US6383523Jun 12, 2001May 7, 2002Howard MuradPharmaceutical compositions and methods for managing skin conditions
US6673374Sep 17, 2001Jan 6, 2004Howard MuradPharmaceutical compositions and methods for managing skin conditions
US6908628Jun 10, 2002Jun 21, 2005Oftrai, S.L.Disinfectant and antiseptic composition
US7018660Mar 11, 2002Mar 28, 2006Howard MuradPharmaceutical compositions and methods for managing skin conditions
EP1266571A1 *Jun 11, 2002Dec 18, 2002Oftrai, S.L.New desinfectant and antiseptic composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/3, 134/40
International ClassificationC09G1/14, C11D7/60
Cooperative ClassificationC11D7/5022, C09G1/14, C11D7/265, C11D3/3947
European ClassificationC11D7/50A8, C11D7/26E, C11D3/39H, C09G1/14