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Publication numberUS3298685 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 17, 1967
Filing dateJan 16, 1963
Priority dateJan 16, 1963
Publication numberUS 3298685 A, US 3298685A, US-A-3298685, US3298685 A, US3298685A
InventorsWilliams James E
Original AssigneeWilliams James E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Complete circle swing
US 3298685 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. E. WILLIAMS COMPLETE CIRCLE SWING Jan. 17, 1967 i mm 1 T mu w w w E 6 w E h M S 4 Filed Jan. 16, 1965 Arromvey 17, 1957 J. E. WILLIAMS COMPLETE CIRCLE SWING Filed Jan. 16, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 minim INVENTOR.

JAMES E. WILL/4H5 ATToRA/EY 17, 1967 J. E. WILLIAMS COMPLETE CIRCLE SWING Filed Jan. 16, 1 963 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. JAMES E WILLIAMS BY United States Patent 3,298,685 CGMPLET E CIRCLE SWING James E. Williams, 6043 S. 7th St, Phoenix, Ariz.

Filed Jan, 16, 1%3, Ser. No. 251,939 3 Claims. (Cl. 27233) My invention relates in general to an improved swing particularly adapted for play and amusement of children; and having as its significant characteristic the ability to rotate through a complete circle. The invention is characterised further by the fact that swing movement can be in either direction, and movement may be arrested by the swing occupant at any point in a circumference defined by the occupants travel path.

Many types of swings are known, all having a swing member suspended from a pivot and adapted by forward and backward swinging movement about such pivot and normally below the same. Some such swings have permitted an unusually competent performer to develop sufficient momentum to move above the point'of location of the pivot and at times even around the pivot. Amusement devices are known which are power-driven for rotation around a stationary or moving pivot, as may be seen at times in amusement parks. So far as I am aware, however, there has not been made available heretofore a swing designed to carry a child in a forward and reverse direction, after the common practice in conventional swings, to carry the child through a closed circular path in either direction, and permitting the child to arrest its progress at any desired location along the circular path defined by the movement of his body.

The principal object of my invention is the provision of a novel swing of the type identified.

Another object is the provision of a swing of the type identified in which all movement is entirely and at all times completely under the manual control of the child without utilization of power means of any kind.

A further object is the provision of a swing of the type described incorporating safety features limiting the possbility of the childs injuring himself while using the swing.

Other specific objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description taken with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a simple embodiment of the complete circle swing of my present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view looking along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2; 2

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view showing one of the swing supporting frames and showing the position of the swing seat at the time the child enters it;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view partly in elevation taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 1 and showing the manner in which the counter-balancing weight is adjusted;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view partly in elevation taken along the line 66 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevational view showing a detail of the supporting frame structure;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary perspective view with the parts in exploded relation to facilitate showing of details; and

FIG. 9 is a schematic view indicating the manner in which the swing operates.

In accomplishing the objects of the invention, I provide a suitable frame supporting a pivot bar on which a swing frame is rotatably supported. The swing frame comprises a pair of swing bars pivoted to the pivot bar intermediate their ends, with a swinging seat pivotably supported between the swing bars at one end and adjustable counter-weight between the swing bars at the oppo-.

Patented Jan. 17, 1967 site end. Reinforcing means in the form of truss rods or the like form a strong, light-weight cantilever-like swing frame construction. With a child occupying the pivoted swing seat, and the counter-weight suitably adjusted, the entire swing may be caused to rotate in either direction by the application of a relatively small amount of force to the swing frame by the child'as will be explained. By adjusting the force, the child may swing in either direction continuously at a controlled rate of speed, or he may adjust the force at any point in his movement to hold himself in a stationary position. Those skilled in the art will understand that reference to a child is descriptive and has no limiting significance of any kind.

The supporting frame indicated generally by the reference character 10 includes a generally rectangular base portion 11 and a pair of substantially identical A-frames, each comprising a vertical upright 12 and a pair of diagonal uprights 13 and 14. A bracket 16 shown as comprising a sectional angle iron has the three upright members 12, '13 and 14 secured to the vertical portion of the bracket (FIGS. 3 and 7.) A pillow block 17 is secured to the horizontal portion of the bracket 16 by bolts 18, and the pillowblock engages around an enlarged bearing portion 19 (FIG. 8 on a horizontal pivot bar 21.

Looking further at the supporting frame 10, it will be noted that it is formed of pipe and pipe fittings except for the bracket 16, and the latter is formed of a standard piece of angle iron purchasable on the open market. It was in this form that the invention was reduced to practice successfully, but those skilled in the art will understand that commercial construction would normally employ specially fabricated members for the purpose with some advantage in both strength and cost. It is for this reason that I have not described the various pipe fittings in detail, and also for the reason that the various TS and elbows employed are well-known and can be identified on sight by those skilled in the art.

The swing frame indicated generally by the reference character 22 includes swing bars 23 and a plurality of spacing cross members, each of which will be separately described in connection with its particular function. A swing seat indicated generally by the reference character 24 is supported at one end of the pivot bars and a counterbalance 26 adjustably supported on a threaded shaft 27 is at the opposite end of the swing frame 22.

While various construction may be employed to provide a pivot bar on which the swing frame is rotatably mounted. I show a specific construction which has been satisfactory in actual use. This construction includes a pair of brackets 28 connected together by the first bar 29 which extends through them and to which the brackets 28 are welded. The pivot bar 21 is then divided with a center portion 29 and projecting ends 31 carrying the bearings 19. The swing bars 23 may be separated at their centers and connected to the brackets 28 as shown particularly in FIGS. 1 and 8. Finally, side projections 32, two for each bracket 28, support truss rods 33 and hold them in spaced relation at the center of the swing frame. It is obvious that with this construction, the pivot bar may 'be considered as forming a part of the swing frame,

although it performs the function of positioning and in part supporting top ends of the A-frames in the same manner as if it was part of the A-frames.

Looking now to the counter-weight end of the swing frame, as shown particularly in FIGS. 1 and 5, the ends of the contiguous swing bars 23 are butt-welded or otherwise secured to brackets 34 secured to a cross frame 36 in the form of an angle iron. The brackets 34 are, themselves, angle irons secured as by welding to the cross frame 36. The truss rods 33 extend through holes in the bracket 34 and are tightened by means of nuts 37.

3 A counter-weight bar 38 is secured to the cross frame 36 by bolts 39.

At the center of the cross frame 36, a plate 41 is attached as by welding, and a U-bolt 42 extending through the plate 41 anchors one end of the threaded shaft 27 by means of nuts 43. At the opposite end of the threaded shaft 27, it is similarly supported by a U-shaped bolt 44 secured to a cross frame 46 which is, in turn, secured to the swing bars 23 by means of U-shaped bolts 47.

At the seat end of the swing frame 22, a pair of brackets 51 and 52 are provided, the contiguous ends of the swing bars 23 being welded to a center portion of such brackets as shown particularly in FIG. 2. In each instance also, the truss rods 33 extend through the brackets 51 and 52 respectively and are tightened by nuts as indicated in FIG. 4 in the same manner as at the counterweight end of the swing frame.

A bracket 53 secured to the bracket 51 forms a rotatable support for a swing supporting pivot 54, and a similar bracket 56 secured to the bracket 52 forms a pivotal support for a second swing supporting pivot 57. The swing itself comprises a frame defined by a pair of generally vertical pipes 58 and 59, a pair of generally horizontal pipes 61 and 62, a pair of transverse pipes 63 and 64, and a plurality of articulated plate sections 66, 67, 68 and 69, to which cushions or the like may be secured. The pipes 58 and 59 and 61 and 62 are secured to a pair of specially designed pipe connections 71 and 72 (see FIG. 2) secured to the swing supporting pivots 54 and 57 respectively. Suitable bracing members 73 may be employed where needed. Thus, with this construction, the swing seat will always remain in an upright position as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 6, regardless of the position of the swing frame.

A transverse safety retainer bar 74 extends through the pivot 57 and has an enlarged threaded end 76 which is engaged in the internally threaded special coupling 71 as shown in FIG. 2 so that when the child is in swing position, it may grasp this safety bar and be prevented from falling out of the chair. For the child to get out of the chair, it is necessary that this retainer bar 74 be retracted. An anchoring bar 78 is secured to the near A-frame as shown in FIGS. 1 and 8, and it has a hole 79 into which the end of the retainer bar 74 may be projected as shown in FIG. 6. This arrangement has the effect of anchoring the swing frame against movement at the place where the child enters, removing the retaining bar 74 only at this position, and providing for locking the swing frame against movementwhen the swing is unattended, such as by means of a padlock 81 as shown in FIG. 6.

Another safety feature associated with the starting position is the use of an anchoring chain 82 which is secured to the bar 73 and is adapted for attachment to the swing frame when the seat is at its lowermost position as illustrated in FIG. 4.

Still another safety feature is the use of an actuating and safety disc 84 apertured at its center to pass the swing supporting pivot 54 and secured in position by a pair of U-bolts 86 extending around the contiguous swing bar 23 and tightened in position by means of nuts 87. This disc prevents the possibility of the child getting his hand or arm caught between any of the relatively moving parts, and it also prevents a readily-engageable actuating member as will be explained. The disc 83 may also be employed on the right, but it is not shown to simplify the illustration.

One of the advantages of the specific instructions shown in the drawings is the ability to dismantle the entire assembly for shipping in the general manner indicated in FIG. 8. It will be noted that the bracket 16 is integral with the upright 14 of the A-frame and this is accomplished suitably such as by welding as indicated at 88 in FIGS. 4 and 7. Each of the uprights, of course, is also secured to the rectangular bottom frame 11 by threaded attachement to a T, and at the top for a flattened aper- 4 tured area for attachment to the bracket 16 by means of bolts 89.

The position of the adjustable counter-weight 26 may be adjusted to the weight of the swing occupant by a person in attendance, in which case the swing frame may be in any convenient position to permit the attendant to turn the counterweight for longitudinal movement such, for example, as the general position as indicated in FIG. 1. Normally, at least a preliminary adjustment will be made before the swing frame is released and while the parts are in the position shown in FIG. 4. A plurality of steps 91 may be provided on either or both A-frames, preferably on at least the A-frame carrying the bar 78. Once a persons relative weight has been established by trial and error, the counter-weight may be set to exact position before starting to swing. Even a relatively young child, say, seven or eight years old, can frequently adjust the counter-weight himself to a mark suitably placed on the threaded shaft 27, and to do this, he will use the steps 91 while the swing frame is locked in position by means of the locking bar 78.

When the swing frame has been stabilized to provide equal weight at opposite sides of the horizontal pivot bar, the child may propel himself forwardly or backwardly by either a pushing movement or pulling movement, as the case may be, against the swing frame. When the safety and actuating disc 84 is employed, he may propel himself by a pushing or pulling movement on the disc itself. It should be borne in mind that the childs position relative to the swing frame will change as the swing frame rotates, because the swing itself, being suspended on a pivot, causes the child to retain an upright position, as shown in FIG. 1, at all times.

FIG. 9 is a schematic view which may be consulted in connection with the following explanation of the manner in which movement occurs and the manner of controlling such movement. In this view, the supporting from is indicated schematically by the reference character 19, and the swing frame by the straight line 22. A vir tual pivot point is indicated at 92 and the swing frame is subject to movement through a complete circle 93 in either direction as indicated by the double arrow 94. A fixed weight 96 is indicated near one end of the swing frame 22 and, at the opposite end, there is an equalizing weight 97 suspended from a pivot point 98. The suspended weight 97 is adapted also to move through a circle 99 in either direction as indicated by the double arrow 101. The suspended weight 97 in actual practice comprises the pivot swing with the child in it, and the fixed weight 96 comprises the counter-weights 2 6 and 38, it being kept in mind that once the counter-weight has been adjusted, it remains immovable during the actual operation of the device.

With the arrangement of parts shown, it is obvious that any relative movement causing the suspended weight 97 to be partially distributed at an extended distance from the pivot 92 will cause the end of the swing frame carrying the suspended weight to move downwardly. This is due to the fact that when the weight is shifted away from the pivot 92, it becomes relatively heavier in exactly the same way that a weight moved along a beam on a balance will reflect increased or decreased poundage and balance off increased or decreased poundage on the scale platform. In a similar manner, if the suspended weight is moved closer to the pivot, then an opposite movement of the swing frame will occur. More specifically, as shown in FIG. 9, the dotted line position 97a shows in an exaggerated fashion an unbalancing of the weight causing the swing frame to rotate in the direction indicated by the arrow 102. On the other hand, if the weight 97 is forced to the position shown in 97b in broken lines, the movement of the swing frame will be in the direction indicated by the arrow 103. It should be remembered also that when the swing frame moves past a dead center vertical position, with the suspended weight 97 at either the top or bottom, the forces involved are reversed; and if continued movement is desired, it is necessary that a pulling action be changed to a pushing action and vice Tversa. The movement is very simple and requires relatively very little strength, it being kept in mind that the extreme broken line positions 97a and 97b will seldom, if ever, be reached in actual practice.

The above explanation appears to explain the fact of movement by the child pressing against the swing frame; and while I believe such explanation to be correct in all respects, the invention is not in any way limited by such explanation.

I have found that children quickly master the technique of controlling the swing of the present invention to cause it to perform in its intended manner.

I do not wish to be limited to the exact structure shown and described, the scope of the invention being pointed out in the claims.

I claim:

1. A swing of the character described comprising:

(a) a supporting frame,

(b) a swing frame,

(0) means for pivoting the swing frame intermediate its ends for 360 rotation in a vertical plane,

(d) a swing seat,

(e) a pivot suspending said swing seat from said swing frame near one end of said frame for 360 rotation with respect thereto, said swing seat being dimensioned to place the body of the child in a sitting position partly above and partly below said pivot, said seat including a slidable retaining bar aligned with the seat pivot and adapted to engage the support frame when moved longitudinally to release the child from the seat, whereby to lock the swing frame against rotation, and

(f) a counter-balancing weight at the opposite end of said swing frame adapted to substantially exactly balance opposite ends of the swing frame, whereby pushing movement by the child against the swing frame will cause rotation thereof in one direction and pulling movement of the child against the swing frame will cause rotation in an opposite direction.

2. A swing of the character described comprising:

(a) a supporting frame,

(b) a swing frame,

(c) means for pivoting the swing frame intermediate its ends for 360 rotation in a vertical plane,

(d) a swing seat,

(e) a pivot suspending said swing seat from said swing frame near one end of said frame for 360 rotation with respect thereto, said swing seat being dimensioned to place the body of the child in a sitting po sition partly above and partly below said pivot,

(f) at least one actuating and safety disc secured to the swing frame in alignment with the swing seat pivot, and

(g) a counter-balancing weight at the opposite end of said swing frame adapted to substantially exactly balance opposite ends of the swing frame, whereby pushing movement by the child against the swing frame will cause rotation thereof in one direction and pulling movement of the child against the swing frame will cause rotation in an opposite direction.

3. A swing of the character described comprising:

(a) a supporting frame,

(b) a swing frame,

(0) means for pivoting the swing frame intermediate its ends for 360 rotation in a vertical plane,

((1) a swing seat,

(e) a pivot suspending said swing seat from said swing frame near one end of said frame for 360 rotation with respect thereto, said swing seat dimensioned to place the body of the child in a sitting po-' sition partly above: and partly below said pivot, (f) a counter-balancing weight at the opposite end of said swing frame adapted to substantially exactly balance opposite ends of the swing frame, said counter-balancing weight including a weight fixed on the swing frame, a threaded shaft running longitudinally of the swing frame, and an adjustable counter-weight threaded on said shaft, to provide longitudinal adjustable movement of said counterweight to balance the counter-weight to the weight of a child, whereby pushing movement by the child against the swing frame will cause rotation thereof in one direction and pulling movement of the child against the swing frame will cause rotation in an opposite direction.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,139,232 5/1915 Schwarz 27233 1,209,881 12/1916 Polley 27254 1,557,942 10/1925 Matthews 272--49 2,537,399 1/1951 Doris 27233 RICHARD C. PINKI-IAM, Primary Examiner.

F. B. LEONARD, A. W. KRAMER, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1139232 *Jul 13, 1914May 11, 1915Frederick SchwarzRotary swing.
US1209881 *Jul 5, 1916Dec 26, 1916George Stephen PolleyTeeter-board.
US1557942 *Sep 11, 1922Oct 20, 1925Corydon Matthews LeeAmusement device
US2537399 *Nov 29, 1946Jan 9, 1951Doris Robert JHorizontal axis roundabout
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3439914 *Feb 19, 1965Apr 22, 1969Willard JohnInclined carrousel propelled by weight-shifting of occupants to change the center of gravity
US3662747 *Apr 15, 1970May 16, 1972Chester I WilliamsCirculation-stimulating machine
US4018435 *Jun 13, 1975Apr 19, 1977Howell George CPlayground apparatus
US4032138 *Jun 28, 1976Jun 28, 1977Arrow Development Co., Inc.Adjustable position counterweight assembly for amusement ride
US4147343 *Jun 2, 1978Apr 3, 1979Hyde Phillip RAcrobatic amusement device
US4240623 *Jul 12, 1978Dec 23, 1980Edwards Paul ACircle swing
US4787375 *Jul 2, 1986Nov 29, 1988Krause Nicolaas J P RTherapeutic apparatus
US5449334 *Mar 22, 1994Sep 12, 1995Kingsbury; DougRotatable exercise apparatus
US5658201 *Nov 13, 1995Aug 19, 1997Airsurfer, Inc.Swinging boom amusement ride
US6988951 *Jan 21, 2003Jan 24, 2006Newman Sven DFloating machine
US7572190 *Jun 23, 2006Aug 11, 2009Dream Visions, LlcSingle rider teeter-totter
US8033921Aug 3, 2009Oct 11, 2011Dream Visions, LlcBungee teeter-totter
US8100776Aug 5, 2009Jan 24, 2012Dream Visions, LlcSingle rider teeter-totter
EP1861185A1 *Feb 24, 2006Dec 5, 2007Toymonster LimitedPlayground equipment
WO2013032968A1 *Aug 27, 2012Mar 7, 2013Ortega Giovani MTow type stroller
Classifications
U.S. Classification472/16, 472/112
International ClassificationA63G9/08, A63G9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63G9/08
European ClassificationA63G9/08