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Publication numberUS3299484 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1967
Filing dateJul 2, 1964
Priority dateJul 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3299484 A, US 3299484A, US-A-3299484, US3299484 A, US3299484A
InventorsDavid Pernick
Original AssigneeDavid Pernick
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fabric inspection machine
US 3299484 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1967 D. PERNICK 3 9 FABRIC INSPECTION MACHINE Filed July 2, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fan. 1

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D- PERNICK FABRIC INSPECTION MACHINE Filed July 2, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Tic E.

INVENTOR. 04 W0 PERM/CA United States Patent 3,299,484 FABRIC INSPECTION MACHINE David Pernick, 1020 Shore Blvd., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11235 Filed July 2, 1964, Ser. No. 379,975 4 Claims. (CI. 26-70) The present invention relates to winding machines and, more particularly, to an improved machine for unwinding and rewinding a rolled-up web or bolt of fabric to inspect and/or measure the fabric.

Machines of the foregoing type have been devised wherein a rod was inserted into the center of the bolt, the ends of the rods placed on supporting bearings, and a take-up roll caused the fabric to be unwound and rewound. In so unwinding the fabric it was subjected to considerable tension which was not tolerable particularly when working with stretchable fabrics. Also extreme difficulty was encountered in inserting the rod into the bolt, whereby valuable time was consumed.

Machines also have been devised wherein the bolt was supported on idler rolls but here again the fabric was subjected to undesirable high tension.

Machines also were devised wherein the rod inserted into the bolt was driven to unwind the fabric. While this minimized tension, the difiiculty of inserting the rod into the bolt and the problem of time consumption still remained.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a machine of the type indicated herein which overcomes the foregoing difficulties and disadvantages.

Another object is to provide such a machine which allows the fabric to be unwound and/ or rewound under substantially tensionless conditions.

Another object is to provide such a machine which is equipped with an improved viewing frame.

Another object is to provide such a machine which enables the fabric to be removed in either direction to enable sections of the fabric to be re-inspected and to unwind the rewound fabric and further rewind the same.

Another object is to provide such a machine which enables the bolt of fabric to be unwound, so that both the front and the back of the fabric, selectively, can be inspected.

Another object is to provide such a machine which measures the length of the web of fabric, under substantially tensionless conditions, at the same time it is being inspected and records the measured length in units of chosen for purposes of illustration and description and is shown in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the application wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a machine in accordance with the present invention. 1

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the machine shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 on FIG. 1 illustrating a drive arrangement.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4--4 on ice FIG. 1 illustrating an arrangement for handling, inspecting and measuring the fabric.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the line 55 on FIG. 3 illustrating a detail of the drive arrangement.

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6 -6 on FIG. 3 illustrating another detail of the drive arrangement.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, a machine is shown which generally comprises a framework 10, a lower let-off or unwinding arrangement 11 for a bolt B of fabric, an upper take-up or fabric rewinding arrangement 12, a fabric inspection frame 14, between the left-off and takeup arrangements, and a drive 15 (FIG. 3) for the let-off and take-off arrangements.

The framework 10 includes a base 16, and a pair of upright side frames 17 and 18, the frame 18 being hollow to provide a compartment for housing and concealing the drive 15 (FIG. 1).

The let-off arrangement 11 (FIGS. 1, 4 and 5) includes a pair of horizontal, parallel spaced apart rolls 19 and 20 for supporting the bolt of fabric B, drive shafts 21 and 22 respectively for the rolls 19 and 20 journalled for rotation between the side frames 17 and 18 above the base and having one end extending into the compartment provided by the side frame 18, and a roller basket provided by a plurality of rollers 24 at each side of the rolls 19 and 20 for retaining the bolt of fabric on at least one of the let-off rolls in driven contact therewith. It is, of course, understood that a single roll 19 may be used for supporting and driving the bolt of fabric B. A bolt positioning guide is provided by a pair of fixed rods 25 above the roller basket and a pair of crosswise extending bars 26 with depending arcuate shields 27 mounted on the rods 25, each engaging a side of the bolt and the web of fabric being unwound. Preferably, the bars 26 with depending shields 27 can be adjusted lengthwise to accommodate fabric bolts B of various widths.

The take-off arrangement 12 (FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4) includes a horizontal take-up and measuring roll 30, a drive shaft 31 for the roll 30 journalled for rotation between the side frame 17 and 18 near the upper end and having one end extending into the compartment provided by the side frame 18, and an upright inwardly facing channel member 32 on each of the side frames 17 and 18 having the ends of a heavy fabric Wind-up rod 34 disposed therein to guide this rod in a vertical direction as the rewound fabric builds up in diameter or decreases in diameter. If desired, the drive shaft 31 may extend outwardly of the side frame 18 (FIGS. 1 and 2) and a hand wheel 35 may be secured thereto for turning the take-up roll manually when the leading end of the web of fabric is attached to the wind-up rod 34.

Since the take-up roll 30 drives the web of fabric at a constant linear speed, as will be explained more fully hereinafter, this roll can be utilized for measuring the length of the web by providing a conventional counter 36 geared to indicate units of length, such as yards, timing gears 37 and 38 on the drive shaft 31 and the counter driven shaft, respectively, and a timing belt 39 for the gears 37 and 38.

The fabric inspection frame 14 (FIGS. 1 and 4) includes a front and back rod 41 and 42, respectively, supported at the upper end of the frame 14 and a front and back rod 43 and 44, respectively, supported at the lower end of the frame 14 with the web of fabric passing between the front and back rods, and an opaque board 45 secured to the frame 14 to the rear of the back rods. The frame 14 can be mounted between the side frames 17 and 18 in any suitable manner, but preferably only.

the upper back rod 42 is pivotally supported between the side frames 17 and 18, so that the inspection frame 14 can be tilted upwardly to position the web section being inspected at an angle with respect to light directed thereon which gives the inspector maximum viewing facility.

The drive 15 (FIGS. 3, 5 and 6) generally comprises a reversible motor 50 for driving both let-off and take-up roll-s at about equal speeds, a speed adjusting arrangement whereby these rolls are driven exactly at equal speeds, and an arrangement for reversing the direction in which the let-off rolls are driven.

The drive for the let-off and take-up rolls includes a pulley 51 on the take-up roll shaft 31 driven by a belt 52 from a pulley 54 on the motor drive shaft, and a second pulley 55 on the take-up roll shaft 31 for driving the let-off rolls through the reversing arrangement, about to be described, by a belt 56.

The reversing arrangement includes a shaft 57 on the frame 18 (FIG. 6) a pulley 58 rotatably mounted on the shaft 57 driven by the belt 56, a gear 59 rotatably mounted on the shaft 57 and driven by the pulley 58, a gear 60 and a pulley 61 secured to the let-off roll drive shaft 21, a pulley 62 secured to the let-off driven shaft 22 driven by a belt 64 on the pulley 61, so that both let-off shafts rotate in the same direction at all times, a gear 65 mounted for rotation on a shaft 66 (FIG. 5) supported by the side frame 18 and in mesh with the gear 60, and a gear 67 always in mesh with the gear 59 and being rotatably mounted at the lower end of a pivotally mounted lever 68 for selectively placing the gear 67 in mesh with either the gear 60 or the gear 65 to enable the let-off rolls to be driven in either direction. The lever 68 is operated by a rod 69 having its inner end attached to the upper end of the lever and being slidably mounted on the front of the side frame 18 and extending outwardly thereof with a manually engageable knob 70 at its outer end.

The speed adjusting arrangement includes the pulley 58 which for this purpose is of the variable diameter type, an idler 71 engaging the belt 56 between the pulleys 55 and 58, and mechanism 72 mounted at the front of the side frame 18 for supporting the idler and for varying the tension applied to the belt 56 by the idler by means of a screw threaded into a fixed nut (not shown) and driven by a crank or hand wheel 75 at the front of the machine. Thus by increasing the belt tension, the sheaves 76 of the pulley 58 are spread and the belt 56 engages the same at a smaller diameter to increase the speed at which the let-off rolls are driven. Likewise by decreasing the belt tension, the sheaves 76 of the pulley 58 are urged towards each other by a spring 77 and the belt 56 engages the sheaves 76 at a larger diameter to reduce the speed at which the let-oif rolls are driven.

In operation, a bolt of fabric B is placed on the let-off rolls 19 and and the guide bars 26 with depending shields 27 are adjusted, and the leading end of the web is threaded through the rods of the inspection frame and is placed over the take-up roll in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 4, and is attached to the wind-up rod 34 which is urged by gravity into driving contact with the take-up roll 30. The take-up roll 30 is turned slowly to determine whether or not adjustments must be made so that let-off and take-up of the fabric are accomplished at exactly the same speed. If required, such adjustments are made in the manner already described herein, whereby the fabric is let-off and taken up at substantially zero tension, so that stretching thereof is avoided.

With the reversing gear 67 positioned as shown in full lines (FIG. 3), the motor 50 is run to rotate the take-up roll 30 in a clockwise direction and to rotate the let-off rolls in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 4 and indicated by the arrows, so that the fabric passes upwardly through the inspection frame 14 for viewing the front face of the fabric. In the event the inspector is doubtful as to whether or not he has observed a fault in a section of the fabric already rewound, the motor is stopped and is then reversed to run back the fabric for reinspection. Unwinding and rewinding is then continued until all of the fabric is wound as a bolt upon the rod 34.

'In the event it is desired to also inspect the back face of the fabric, the bolt is removed from the take-up arrangement, the rod 34 is removed from the bolt of fabric and is replaced between the channel members 32, the bolt is again placed on the let-off rolls but this time with its leading edge positioned for unwinding in a counterclockwise direction, as shown in broken lines in FIG. 4, the gear 67 is placed in mesh with the gear 65, as shown in broken lines in FIG. 3, the web is again threaded through the frame 14 and attached to the roll 34, and the motor 56 is operated as previously described to unwind and rewind the fabric with the back face thereof bein viewed as it passes through the inspection frame.

As the fabric is let-off and taken up, the length thereof is measured by the take-up roll which is in frictional engagement with the fabric and thus moves a length of fabric equal to its circumference for each revolution thereof. These revolutions are counted by the counter 36 which translates the count into units of length. Preferably, a counter is utilized which can be shut off when sections of fabric are reinspected or subtracts when the motor is reversed for reinspection, so that an accurate measurement is obtained. In practice, it was observed that the length indicated while inspecting the front face of the fabric cor responded to the nominal length of the fabric on the bolt and corresponded to the length indicated while inspecting the back face of the fabric. This observation establishes the fact that the fabric is not stretched during inspection thereof.

From the foregoing description it will be seen that the present invention provides an improved and highly versatile machine which is easily operated to facilitate inspection of both sides of the fabric. This machine is simple and practical in arrangement but yet is sufficiently rugged in construction to withstand such usage to which it normally is subjected.

As various changes may be made in the form, construe tion, and arrangement of the parts herein, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention and without sacrificing any of its advantages, it is to be understood that all matters are to be interpreted as illustrative and not in any limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. In a fabric inspection machine, the combination of a pair of let-off rolls for supporting and unwinding a rolledup web of fabric, a take-up roll for rewinding the web into rolled-up condition, means for supporting the rewound rolled-up web on said take-up roll in driven contact therewith, fabric inspecting means between said let-ofi. rolls and said take-up roll for positioning the web to visually inspect the same, and drive means for rotating said letoff rolls and said take-up roll at a speed to cause said let-off rolls to unwind the web at about the same rate as said web is rewound by said take-up roll, said drive means including means for driving said take-up roll, a first pulley rotatable with said take-up roll, a second pulley, a belt driven by said first pulley and driving said second pulley, means for rotatably interconnecting said pair of let-off rolls for rotation at the same speed and in the same direction, and gear means interposed between said last mentioned means and said second pulley for selectively rotating said let-off rolls in opposite directions.

2. A machine according to claim 1, wherein said gear means include a first gear rotatable with said second pulley, a second gear rotatable with one of said pair of let-off rolls, a third gear in mesh with said second gear, a fourth gear in mesh with said first gear, and means for selectively placing said fourth gear in mesh with said second and third gears, whereby said let-off rolls can be rotated in opposite directions for permitting both sides of said fabric to be inspected.

3. A machine according to claim 2, wherein said last mentioned means include a pivotally mounted lever ro tatably supporting said fourth gear at one end thereof,

and manually operable means at the other end of said lever for shifting said lever.

4. A machine according to claim 1, wherein said second pulley is a variable diameter pulley, and means are provided for tensioning said belt to vary the effective diameter of said second pulley, whereby the speed of rotation of said let-ofl rolls can. be adjusted to accurately accommodate the demand of said take up roll.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 858,847 7/1907 Allen.

Hofer 242- 78.7 Remington 26-70 Tobler 2670 Clark et a1. 24267.4 =Ellis. Lorig 24278.7 X Mageoch 242-67.4 Hasselquist 24267.3 Stephens et a1. 2670 Pernick.

ROBERT R. MACKEY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US858847 *Jul 3, 1905Jul 2, 1907Edwin A AllenIndicator or display apparatus.
US2020889 *Dec 10, 1932Nov 12, 1935American Rolling Mill CoApparatus for uncoiling coiled sheet metal
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3811371 *May 8, 1972May 21, 1974S HardyPaint spray booth
US4234135 *Sep 10, 1979Nov 18, 1980Kellwood CompanyWeb inspection apparatus
US4448363 *Feb 26, 1981May 15, 1984Mukenschnabl Donald FRewinder apparatus
US4630339 *May 4, 1984Dec 23, 1986Krantz America, Inc.Method and apparatus for inspecting a length of material
US4699329 *Sep 4, 1985Oct 13, 1987Willy Strohmeyer MaschinenbauArrangement for rolling up and unrolling of material webs
US5072527 *Jun 6, 1990Dec 17, 1991Loomie Leo SMethod and apparatus for conveying and tensioning a length of sheet material
Classifications
U.S. Classification26/70, 242/542.3, 242/564.5, 242/538.1
International ClassificationD06H3/02, D06H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06H3/02
European ClassificationD06H3/02