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Publication numberUS3299511 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1967
Filing dateJul 9, 1962
Priority dateJul 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3299511 A, US 3299511A, US-A-3299511, US3299511 A, US3299511A
InventorsHutson Clifford L
Original AssigneeHutson Clifford L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dental aspirator
US 3299511 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1967 c. L. Hu-rsoN DENTAL ASPIRATOR Filed July 9, 1962 WW] m mi.

ArrofQA/E/ 3,299,511 DENTAL ASPIRATOR Cliiford L. Hutson, 885 Cumberland Road,

Glendale, Calif. 91202 Filed July 9, 1962, Ser. No. 203,264 J 7 Claims. (Cl. 32-33) This invention relates to a dental aspirator instrument adapted for 4use in connection with conventional high ,air fl'ow vacuum systems presently employed in dental oflices.

' Certain objections have been found to attend the use of dental aspirators of the type heretofore made, parlticularly `in selectively spot positioning the intake end pf the tip of the instrument, since in so positioning the tip 'in the mouth of a patient, the operator is often required Vto eiiect wrist movements which are awkward and may result in excessive twisting of the ilexible tube which connects the instrument with a'source of vacuum. Moreover, the movements of the wrist ofthe operator such as required to variously `position the intake end of the aspirator while a dental drill is in operation, parfticularly sudden movements, are likely to disturb the dentist and may cause injury of the mouth or damage of lthe tooth being treated. l

` This spot positioning of the intake end of the aspirator is most importantin view of the universally used wash field technique in connection with high speed drills. In the use of this technique a steady llow of water land/ or -air spray is applied to the tooth area being prepared by the dental drill. The high speed drill and the washed vfield technique cause large amounts of liquids and solid matter, such as portions of a tooth, bits of filling material, cement, etc., to be collected in the mouth, and 'unless removed quickly and thoroughly, proper tooth treatment may be interferred with.

lt is the primary object of this invention to provide an improved dental aspirator ,instrument which is constructed and arranged in a novel manner to eliminate the above notedV objectionsand to serve more effectively for thoroughly removing excess fluids and solids from the mouth of the patient during the'drilling of a tooth.

It is another object of this invention to provide a 4dental aspirator instrument of the character describedV ,in whicha tip member of novel construction and having zablevelled intake end is rotatably connected with a handle in" such a` manner that an operator holding the 'handle may, with the lingers of the hand, readily turn the` tip in either direction best to position the bevelled intake' end with respect toa particulararea of a tooth or'l other portion of the mouth to remove therefrom liquids and solids as required.

A further object hereof is the` provision of an aspirator ofthe character,v described wherein the swivel tip is proi Vvidedwith a knurled operating ring or collar readily accessible to the lingers of the'hand of the operator holding the handle for `freely turning the `rotatable tip, no unusual, awkward or appreciable movement of the wrist of the operator being required to selectively positionjthe intake end as desired. f

A further object is the provision of an aspirator such as described in which the tip is of special construction to facilitate the mounting thereon and the removal there- ,from yof a protective sleeve of rubber which acts as a 4shield to prevent thermal shock on sensitive teeth and fillings as well as mechanical shock of metal against 'the teeth and tissue, while also eliminating metal shock 'against operating instruments, burrs and stones. The

rubber sleeve also extends beyond the bevelled intake l Patented Jan. 24, 1967 ICC `hereinafter described or will become apparent to Athose skilled in the art, and the novel features of the invention will be defined in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of a dental aspirator instrument embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2 2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 3 3 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional View taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

The illustrative embodiment of a dental aspirator constructed in accordance with this invention as shown in the accompanying drawing, generally comprises a tubular and somewhat angular handle 1 of special construction and an especially constructed tubular and compara- -tively straight tip member 2 swivelled to the handle and provided with a bevelled intake end 3. The handle and tip member may be conveniently made of suitable metal tubing capable of beingthoroughly sterilized without damage, for example, stainless steel.

As here sho-wn, the t-ubular handle is sectional and consists of a short socket section 4 to which the tip member 2 is swivelled, and a 'longer angular section 5 which has one end iitted frictionally within the socket section with its other end portion 6 somewhat reduced in outside diameter and disposed to be connected with the usual flexible hose, not shown, leading to a source of` vacuum. This sectional construct-ion of the handle makes it possible readily to separate sections thereof so that the sections, together with the swivel connection of the tip with the section 4, are subject to being thoroughly sterilized. The outer end portion of the socket section 4 may be kn-urled to aid inhol-ding the lhandle in the desired position when twisting the tip mem-ber 2.

The manner in 'which the tip is swivelly connected to the socket section 4 of the handle is illustrated in FIG. 3, the inner end portion '7 of the tip member being slightly reduced in diameter so that it may be extended freely into the bore 8 of the socket section 4 and will tbe freely rotatable therein. The tip is held in place in the Ibore 8 after being inserted therein by having its outer end spun outwardly to form a flange 9 which abuts a shoulder 10 formed by counterboring the remainder 11 of the bore through the socket section 4. The opposed surfaces of the -bore 8 in the section 4 and end portion 7 of the tip 2 may be machined to assure that the tip will turn freely with respect to the socket section 4. The outwardly spun flange 9 likewise has a smooth contact with the shoulder `10 so as to avoid friction `in the turning of the tip relative to the socket section 4 of the handle.

The outer end portion of the angular section 5 of the handle is also slightly reduced in diameter so that a very small shoulder 12 is formed on the exterior thereof to engage the outer end of the socket section 4 so that the inner end of the section 5 will be slightly spaced from contact with the flan-ge 9, thereby avoiding interference with free rotation of the tip.

As a means to facilitate the turning of the tip 2 with the ting-ers, a knurled ring 14 of greater diameter than the handle 1 is pressed fitted on the inner end portion of the tip 2 and abuts an annular shoulder 15 so that the ring is spaced from contact with the adjacent end of the socket section 4 of the handle. Positioned -in this manner so that it is held against turning relative to the tip 2, the knurled rin-g 14 readily may be grasped fby the fingers of the hand of the operator holding the handle so as to turn the tip 2 in either d-irection as desired for exact spot positioning of the bevelled intake end 3.

It should be noted that the shoulder 15 prevents outward movement of the ring 14 on the tip member and also limits longitudinal movement of the tip member relative to the handle 1 since it will abut the adjacent end of section 4 of the handle 'from wh-ich it is normal-ly slightly spaced. Thus, the flange 9 and the ring 14 serve to rotatably secure the tip member to the handle without interfering with free rotation of the tip member.

As a means `for preventing the metal tip 2 from coming into contact with surfaces of the mouth of the patient as well as the teeth of the patient and surrounding7 tissue, the tip is covered with a protective sleeve 16 made of soft rubber or other suitable cushioning material, this sleeve having a bevelled end 17 which projects beyond the bevelled end 3 of the metal tip to prevent this end from coming in contact with and possibly injuring a tooth or the tissue of the mouth. This sleeve 16 readily may be applied to the tip 2 in view of the special construction of the latter `wherein a slot 18 extends longitudinally thereof from a point adjacent the knurled ring 14 and throughvthe outer :bevelled end 3. On the opposite side of the tip 2 a similar slot 19 is formed, but extends longitudinally only lfrom adjacent the knurled ring 14 to a point spaced inwardly from the bevelled end of the tip. These slots are closed or sealed by the sleeve 16 so that they do not -interefere with the vacuum action in the tip member. Moreover, these slots make it Ipossible to squeeze and some-what collapse the tip so that the rubber sleeve 16 readily may be fitted thereon and will be frictionally held in place lby the expanding action of the slotted portions of the tip. The slots 18 and 1-9 also facilitate ready removal of the sleeve, since they permit Waterk to enter between the sleeve 16 and the exterior of the tip -2 upon immersing the latter with the sleeve thereon in water, thereby providing lubrication. permitting ready removal of the sleeve.

While specific structural details -have been shown and described, it should be vunderstood that changesand alterations may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A dental aspirator, comprising: a tubular handle adapted to be connected to a source of vacuum forming an elliptical inlet opening; a tubular, elongated, strai-ght tip member having a `bevelled intake end; means providing a swivel joint of the tip member with said handle whereby said tip member may be freely rotated relative to said handle to variously position said bevelled intake end lwithin the mouth of a patient; and an operating ring xed to said tip adjacent said joint in position to be manipulated for turning the tip relative to the handle by the fingers of the hand of an operator vholding the handle.

2. A dental aspirator as defined in claim 1, wherein said hand-le is formed of two sections having lbores therethrough and detachably telescopically connected to one another, said tip member y'being swivelly mounted in one section and the other section adapted to be connected to said source of vacuum.

3. A dental aspirator, comprising: a tubular handle adapted to be connected to a source of vacuum; a tubular, elongated, straight tip member having a bevelled intake Iend forming an elliptical inlet opening; means providing a swivel joint of the other end of the tip member with .said handle whereby said tip member may be freely rotated relative to said handle to variously position said bevelled intake end within the mouth of a Ipatient; a pro- :tective sleeve of cushioning material surrounding said tip member and extending outwardly beyond said bevelled intake end; said sleeve having its extended end bevelled; and an operating ring lixed to and surrounding said tip member; said ring being of greater diameter than that of said 'handle and disposedl between the other end of said protective sleeve and one endl of said handle.'

4. A dental aspirator, comprising: a tubular handle adapted to be connected to a source of vacuum; a tubular, elongated, straight tip member having bevelled intake end means forming an elliptical inlet opening; means providing a swivel joint of the tip member with said handle `whereby said tip member may be `freely rotated relatively to said handle Ito variously position said bevelledintake end means within the mouth of a patient; and anv operating ring fixed to said tip member adjacent said joint in position to be manipulated for turning the tip relative to the handle by the iin-gers of the hand of an operator holding the handle, said tip member being substantially rigid from said swivel joint to said bevelled .intake end means and said bevelled `intake end means 'being for-med of resilient material deformable to avoid injury to the tissue in the patie'nts mouth. p

5. A dental aspirator, comprising: a tubular handle adapted to be connected to a source of Vacuum; a tubular, tip member; means providing a swivel joint of one end of the tip member and one end of the handle whereby said tip member may be rotated to variously position the other yend thereof in the mouth of a patient; said tip memtber having a slot extending longitudinally thereof; and a cushioning sleeve surrounding said tip member and clos- -ing said slot; said sleeve extending outwardly beyond the outer end of said tip member. p

`6. A dental aspirator, comprising: a tubular handle adapted to be connected to a source of vacuum; a tubular, tip member; means providing a swivel joint of one end of the tip member and one end of the handle whereby said tip member may be rotated to variously position the other end thereof in the mouth of a patient; said tip member having a pair of slots extending `longitudinally thereof; one of said slots extending through said other end of the tip member; the other of said slots terminating short of the ends of the tip member; and a sleeve of cushioning material surrounding said tip member and covering said slots. v

7. dental aspirator, comprising: a tubular handle adapted to be connected to a source of vacuum; a tubular, tip member; means providing a swivel joint of one end of the tip member and one end of the -handle whereby said tiplmember maybe rotated to variously position the other end thereof -i-n the mouth of .a patient; said tip member having a pair of slots extending longitudinally thereof; one of said slots extending through said` other end-of the tip member; the other of said said slots terminating short of the ends of the tip member; and a sleeve of cushioning material surrounding said tip member and covering said slots; said sleeve extending outward-ly beyond the outer end of said tip member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examfaer.

RICHARD I. HOFFMAN, Examiner. n H. PEZZNER, J. W. HINEY, JR., Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US674650 *Sep 25, 1900May 21, 1901John A W LundborgDental tongue-holder and drain-tube.
US1060191 *Sep 24, 1912Apr 29, 1913Fay T KentVacuum cleaning-tool.
US1353587 *Feb 20, 1917Sep 21, 1920White S Dental Mfg CoSaliva-ejector
US1447020 *Oct 12, 1921Feb 27, 1923Josef GrunbergSaliva ejector
US2029734 *Jul 31, 1933Feb 4, 1936Alphonse F PieperDental syringe
US2595666 *May 3, 1949May 6, 1952Hutson Clifford LSaliva ejector
US2711586 *Feb 16, 1953Jun 28, 1955James R GrovesVacuum ejector for dental debris
US2821021 *Oct 31, 1956Jan 28, 1958Pelton & Crane CompanyPower-operated dental aspirator
US3012323 *Feb 19, 1954Dec 12, 1961Vacudent Mfg CompanyMethod of dentistry and apparatus therefor
US3029513 *Oct 29, 1958Apr 17, 1962Fletcher Harold ATelescopic dental siphon
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4265621 *Oct 19, 1979May 5, 1981Mcvey Kenneth ETip for dental aspirator
US4521185 *Aug 22, 1983Jun 4, 1985Cohen Alan PHigh volume oral evacuator
US4752223 *Mar 13, 1987Jun 21, 1988Carlson Leonard GSheath assembly for dental handpiece
US4861266 *Mar 22, 1988Aug 29, 1989Mark AshikuDental aspirator valve and valve sheath
US5165891 *Jan 18, 1991Nov 24, 1992Rily YoungHigh-volume ejector with valves and spacing fin
WO2013007876A1 *Jul 5, 2012Jan 17, 2013Gunilla TaddeoInstrument in connection with oral and dental care
Classifications
U.S. Classification433/96
International ClassificationA61C17/08, A61C17/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61C17/043
European ClassificationA61C17/04B