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Publication numberUS3300926 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 31, 1967
Filing dateDec 28, 1965
Priority dateDec 28, 1965
Publication numberUS 3300926 A, US 3300926A, US-A-3300926, US3300926 A, US3300926A
InventorsWilliam C Heirich
Original AssigneeWilliam C Heirich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall paneling system
US 3300926 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 31, 1967 w. c. HEIRICH WALL PANELING SYSTEM 2' Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 28, 1965 INVENTOR WI LLIAM C. HEIRICH ATTORNEYS Jan. 31, 1967 w. c. HEIRICH WALL PANELING SYSTEM 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 28, 1965 INVENTOR WILLIAM C. HEIRICH ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,300,926 WALL PANELING SYSTEM William C. Heirich, 2912 Wauhilah Drive, Muskogee, Okla. 74401 Filed Dec. 28, 1965, Ser. No. 516,885 4 Claims. (Cl. 52-300) The present application relates generally to application Serial No. 358,024, filed April 7, 1964, and entitled, Canopies, now Patent No. 3,226,891.

The present invention relates generally to a wall paneling system adaptable to either new construction or the modernization of older buildings. While the present paneling system provides an excellent Wall surface for new construction, it is also possible to give an older building that is structurally sound, but outdated appearance-wise, a modern exterior look.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a wall paneling system adaptable to either new construction or the modernization of older building characterized by its simplicity in construction, flexibility of use, and ease of field assembly.

Another object of the present invention is to provide in a wall paneling system a plurality of interlocking panels capable of being slid together end wise or snapped in place, as desired.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a system for adjustably positoning wall paneling elements preselected distances from building front.

Still a further object of the present invention is to provide a system for permitting the interlocking panel elemerits of wall system to slide freely along building front, thus eliminating the necessity of sizing terminal panel elements to precisely fit length of building front.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide in a wall paneling system a simplified technique for securing the sides of terminal panel elements to system framework.

Other objects will become apparent from the ensuing specification and attached drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating generally the mode of modernizing old building front with the use of the present wall paneling system;

FIG. 2 is a top view illustrating generally the attachment of interlocking panel elements to supporting structure on building front;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation partly in section illustrating in detail the attachment of panel elements to building wall;

FIG. 4 is a top view illustrating suggested clip assembly for attaching panel elements to wall, as well as configuration of interlocking flanges of wall panel elements;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of clip assembly employed to attach adjacent wall panels to building front supporting structure; and

FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating attachment of flange of terminal panel to building wall supporting structure with use of suggested side channel fastener.

As seen in FIG. 1, the reference numeral 10 generally designates the surface of building front to be modernized. Attached to building front 10 are T-shaped furring strips 12 to which the individual panels 14 are secured.

Extruded furring strips 12, as seen in FIG. 3, include front vertical walls 16 and 18 held in spaced relationship by U-shaped section 20, and terminate at their extremities in horizontal flanges 22 and 24 respectively. Attached near the center portion of U-shaped section 20 and extending rearwardly therefrom is horizontal member 26 which terminates in rear vertical wall 28 having horizontal flanges 30 and 32 which are secured to the building front 10 with the use of either bracket assembly 34 or 36, as described in detail hereinafter.

"ice

Bracket assembly 34, illustrated in the top portion of FIG. 3, has a top horizontal flange 38 which rests in abutting relationship against the underside of horizontal member 26 of furring strip 12 and is secured thereto by bolt assembly 40. Bracket assembly 34 also includes a lower vertical flange 42, which rests in abutting relationship against building wall 10 and is attached thereto with screw 44.

As seen in the lower portion of FIG. 3, adjustable bracket assembly 36 consists of an upper brace 46- attached to building wall 10 with screw 48, a center member 50 provided with slotted portion extending lengthwise (not shown) terminating in angu lar end section 52 attached to horizontal member 26 of furring strip 12 with bolt assembly 54, and a lower brace 56 attached to building wall 10 with screw 58 and also being provided with lengthwise slotted portion (not shown). Thus, as bolt assemblies 6'0 and 62, which pass through the slotted portions referred to above, are unloosened, the end portion 52 of member 50 may be extended inwardly or outwardly from building wall 10, as desired, thus permitting furring strip 12 to be positioned predetermined distances from building wall 10.

' Panel elements 14 may be attached directly to furring strip 12, as seen in the upper portion of FIG. 3, with the use of self tapping screw 64 which is positioned within U-shaped section 20 of furring strip 12. Alternatively, and as illustrated in the lower portion of FIG. 3, panel elements 14 may be attached to furring strips 12 with the use of clip assemblies 70 shown in detail in FIG. 5.

Clip assemblies 70 each consist of a backplate 72 terminating on one side thereof in curvilinear arm 74 which is generally complementarily configured to rest in abutting relationship against one side of interlocking flange 76 of panel element 14 (FIG. 4). At the top of backplate 72 is located upper horizontally disposed flange 78 having turned-down portion 80 designed to encompass horizontal flange 22 of furring strip 12 (FIG. 3). At the bottom thereof, backplate 72 terminates in lower horizontally disposed flange 82 which rests in abutting relationship against horizontal flange 24 of furring strip 12 (FIG. 3). Near the middle of backplate 72 is located opening 84 through which a self-tapping bolt may be inserted for providing additional support in securing panel elements 14 to the U-shaped sections 20 of fur-ring strips 12. On the other side of backplate 72 is located tapered, overlying flange 86, generally U-shaped in cross-section. Within overlying flange 86 is located wedge element 88 consisting of a first flat section 90, inserted within overlying flange 86 in sliding relationship therewith, and a second section 92 designed to engage the other half of interlocking flange 76 of panel element 14, as seen in FIG. 4. In addition, the edge of wedge section 88 may contain serrations 94 capable of gripping the surface of interlocking flange 76 more tightly.

As seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, the top portions of panel elements 14 are enclosed within top cap 91 which includes channel 93 within which is inserted flashing 95 for mounting against building wall 10, or covering the top of the wall to the top of paneling 14, whichever is necessary or desirable. Similarly, bottom cap 96 encompasses the bottom portions of panel elements 14 and is provided with channel 98 into which is inserted lower flashing 100.

As illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 6, side caps and 112 are attached by any conventional means, such as a rivet 130, directly to furring strips 12. After interlocking flange 76 of terminal panel 14 is inserted within side cap 110, side channel fastener 116 is slid in place downwardly within side cap 110. As seen in FIG. 2, each panel element 14 consists of a first generally overlying flange 76 and a second flange 77 configured to rest within overlying flange 76 of adjacent panel 14'. When inserting side channel fastener 116 within overlying flange 76 (FIG. 6), the single leg 114 tightly secures terminal flange 76 to cap 110. In reverse manner, as seen in FIG. 2, double legs 115 secure flange 77 of other terminal panel 14 within cap 112. Thus, with the use of a side channel 116, of singular configuration, either end of panel elements 14 may be secured within side caps 110 and 112. Side caps 110 and 112 also contain channels 117 to which side flashing 118 may be inserted.

Each of the panel elements 14, as seen in FIGS. 2 and 4, consists of arched or curved side portions 15 and troughlike bottom portions 17. Side portions 15 terminate in locking flanges 76 and 77 as previously described. As the distance between the innermost portions of overlying flange 76 is smaller than the width of top of flange 77, a snap-lock is created. Thus, by pushing inner flange 77 against outer flange 76 in the direction indicated by arrow in FIG. 4, adjacent panels 14 and 14 may be snapped in place. Alternatively, the panels may be slid together end-wise.

Now, the advantages of the present wall paneling system will be discussed. As previously indicated, each panel element 14 is designed with interlocking flanges 76 and 77 permitting adjacent panels 14, 14 to be attached together either by snapping in place or sliding together lengthwise. Thus, field installation is simplified and the structural integrity of assembled wall insured. Although the inner flange 77 of panel 14 may be simply snapped in place within overlying flange 76 of panel element 14, the locking action is not reversible.

In addition, the use of clip assemblies 70 permits panels 14, 14' to be slid along furring strips 12. In this manner, it is no longer necessary to cut one or both terminal panels to precisely fit the length of building wall 10 to be covered since each of the panels 14 can be compressed or stretched, as desired. Thus, the terminal panel(s) can be properly aligned at ends of building wall 10 and intermediate panels slid along furring strips 12 as individual panels are stretched or compressed.

Ease in field assembly and economy of construction is further provided for with the use of side caps 110 and 112 in conjunction with side channel fasteners 116. As fasteners 116 are capable of securing either of locking flanges 76 and 77 of panel elements 14, simply by reversing position of fastener 116, the problem of providing separate fasteners for different terminal locking flanges is avoided.

Top and bottom caps 91 and 96, in addition to adding structural integrity to the paneling system as a whole, provide a simplified basis for attaching finishing flashing 95 and 100, as desired.

Finally, adjustable bracket assembly 36 enables precise positioning of panel elements 14 from building front 10. Frequently, the building wall to be modernized will include offset portions, such as illustrated generally in FIG. 3, requiring panel supporting structure capable of spanning varying distances. Bracket assembly 36 permits such variation with a single uniform structure eliminating time consuming field innovation.

With the construction techniques outline above, low cost of manufacture and flexibility of field installation is achieved in a manner unknown to the prior art. Manilying adjacent each other, said adjacent side portions; of adjacent panels including locking flanges permitting said panel elements to be assembled as a sub-- stantially vertical wall terminating at each end thereof in first and second end panels;

(B) supporting structure positioned along one side of said wall; and

(C) fastening means securing said panel elements to said supporting structure, said fastening means including side caps enclosing the terminal locking flanges of said first and second end panels and channel fasteners of a single configuration slida-bly mounted within said side caps, said channel fasteners having first and second sides complementarily designed to engage the locking flanges of said first and second end panels respectively as well as said side caps.

2. A paneling system as in claim 1, wherein said first sides of said channel fasteners constitute one leg for insertion within the locking flange of said first end panel and said second sides of said channel fasteners constitute two legs for engaging the locking flange of said second end panel, both said first and second legs also abutting said side caps, as desired.

3. A paneling system as in claim 2, including adjustable bracket means attached to the building front and said supporting structure permitting said supporting structure to be positioned varying distances from the building front, as desired.

4. A paneling system as in claim 3, including top and bottom caps encompassing selected end portions of said panel elements, said caps being provided with means for supporting flashing assemblies.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 459,051 9/1891 Streeter 52-714 X 918,824 4/1909 Caywood 52-457 1,810,287 6/1931 Mahon 52-520 X 2,064,984 12/1936 Marsh 52-506 X 2,586,318 2/1952 Fields 52-77 3,234,697 2/1966 Toti 52-588 X FOREIGN PATENTS 535,761 1955 Belgium. 79,221 1962 France.

(1st add. to Pat. No. 1,257,465) 360,793 1962 Switzerland.

References Cited by the Applicant UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,226,891 1/ 1966 Heirich.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

JOHN E. MURTAGH, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US459051 *Mar 15, 1890Sep 8, 1891 Iron roof or other structure
US918824 *Dec 11, 1908Apr 20, 1909Albert D CaywoodFire door and wall.
US1810287 *May 16, 1929Jun 16, 1931R C Mahon CompanyDeck plate clip
US2064984 *Apr 13, 1933Dec 22, 1936Simplon Products CorpWall bracket
US2586318 *Aug 13, 1948Feb 19, 1952Enduro Metal Awning CorpAwning structure
US3226891 *Apr 7, 1964Jan 4, 1966Heirich William CCanopies
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3452500 *Nov 16, 1966Jul 1, 1969Heirich William CWall paneling system
US3474583 *Sep 11, 1968Oct 28, 1969Robertson Co H HInsulated metal wall structure
US3483663 *Feb 19, 1968Dec 16, 1969Gregoire Eng & Dev CoBuilding wall construction
US3571998 *Nov 12, 1968Mar 23, 1971Iacona Marco JMobile home skirting
US3633950 *Oct 8, 1970Jan 11, 1972Simpson CoGrip groove hanger
US3834109 *Mar 7, 1972Sep 10, 1974M IaconaMethod of skirting a mobile home
US4370838 *Aug 14, 1980Feb 1, 1983The Columbus Show Case CompanyCurtain wall
US4388790 *Jun 29, 1981Jun 21, 1983Michael GrecoPartition and paneling system
US4395858 *Jul 6, 1981Aug 2, 1983Gwyther Donald WPanel mounting system and method
US4817538 *Nov 7, 1984Apr 4, 1989Bang & Olufsen Of America, Inc.Construction system for shelves
US6192642Apr 10, 2000Feb 27, 2001Hunter Douglas Inc.Cladding system and panel for use in such system
US6199337 *Nov 20, 1996Mar 13, 2001Hunter Douglas Inc.Cladding system and panel for use in such system
US6427409Feb 14, 2001Aug 6, 2002Hunter Douglas Inc.Cladding system and panel for use in such system
US8112968Jun 23, 2000Feb 14, 2012Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Pre-assembled internal shear panel
US8281551 *Apr 26, 2011Oct 9, 2012Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Corrugated shearwall
US8397454Nov 21, 1997Mar 19, 2013Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Building wall for resisting lateral forces
US8438810 *Jul 29, 2009May 14, 2013Lamtec CorporationWeb or vapor retarder with tie-strap
US8479470Aug 3, 2001Jul 9, 2013Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Building wall for resisting lateral forces
US9085901Feb 13, 2012Jul 21, 2015Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Pre-assembled internal shear panel
US20010002529 *Nov 21, 1997Jun 7, 2001Charles R. CypherBuilding wall for resisting lateral forces
US20020002806 *Aug 3, 2001Jan 10, 2002Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Building wall for resisting lateral forces
US20050126105 *Dec 12, 2003Jun 16, 2005Leek William F.Corrugated shearwall
US20050284073 *Dec 9, 2004Dec 29, 2005Leek William FCorrugated shearwall
US20110197544 *Aug 18, 2011Simpson Strong Tie Co., Inc.Corrugated shearwall
USRE28987 *May 18, 1972Oct 5, 1976 Mobile home skirting
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/300, 52/588.1, 52/798.1, 52/478, D25/121, 52/718.5, 52/58, 52/508, 52/506.1
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0812
European ClassificationE04F13/08B2C2