Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3301746 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 31, 1967
Filing dateApr 13, 1964
Priority dateApr 13, 1964
Also published asDE1461271A1, DE1461271B2, DE1461271C3, DE1796366A1, DE1796366B2, DE1796366C3
Publication numberUS 3301746 A, US 3301746A, US-A-3301746, US3301746 A, US3301746A
InventorsLawrence H Sanford, James B Sisson
Original AssigneeProcter & Gamble
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for forming absorbent paper by imprinting a fabric knuckle pattern thereon prior to drying and paper thereof
US 3301746 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1, 1967 L. H. SANFORD ETAL 3,3 ,746

PROCESS FOR FORMING ABSORBENT PAPER BY IMPRINTING A FABRIC KNUCKLE PATTERN THEREON PRIOR TO DRYING AND PAPER THEREOF Filed April 13, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS Lawrence H. Sanford James B. Sisson AGENT Jan. 1967 R 1.. H. SANFORD ETAL 3, 0 6

PROCESS FOR FORMING ABSORBENT PAPER BY IMPRINTING A FABRIC KNUCKLE PATTERN THEREON PRIOR TO DRYING AND PAPER THEREOF Filed April 15, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig. 6

INVENTORS Lawrence H. Sanford James B. Sisson AGENT United States Patent PROCESS FOR FORMING ABSORBENT PAPER BY IMPRINTING A FABRIC KNUCKLE PATTERN THEREON PRIOR TO DRYING AND PAPER THEREOF Lawrence H. Sanford, Cincinnati, and James B. Sisson, Hamilton, Ohio, assignors to The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed Apr. 13, 1964, Ser. No. 359,295 7 Claims. (Cl. 162-113) This invention relates to the production of low density paper products and has for its general object the provision of a new and useful type of bulky paper sheet for use in tissue, towelling and sanitary products together with a process for its manufacture.

More particularly, the invention disclosed herein comprises a novel process for preparing bulky paper sheets having a highly desirable combination of softness, bulk and absorbency characteristics engendered by particular techniques used in their formation and drying.

Specifically, the bulky paper sheets of the present invention are produced by impressing fabric patterns of selected coarseness on uncompacted paper webs at selected fiber consistencies, induced by thermal pre-drying, prior to final drying.

In addition to providing an exceptionally bulky, soft and absorbent paper sheet, the impression procedures disclosed herein provide means for controlling the creping frequency and regularity in a creped sheet of the present paper to further enhance its appearance and desirable combination of handling characteristics.

In the conventional manufacture of paper webs for use in tissue, towelling and sanitary products, it is customary to perform, prior to drying, one or more pressing operations on the entire surface of the paper web as laid down on the Fourdrinier wire or other forming surface. Conventionally these pressing operations involve subjecting a moist paper web supported on a paper making felt to pressure developed by opposing mechanical members, for example, rolls. Pressing generally accomplishes the triple functions of mechanical water expulsion, web surface smoothing and tensile strength development, and the pressure is applied to the entire surface of the moist paper web by the relatively smooth surface of the felt. In a conventional papermaking machine comprised of a Fourdrinier forming section, a felt pressing section and a Yankee dryer; one of the pressing operations on the entire surface of the paper web referred to above can be performed by a felt pickup, or suction roll which opposes the Couch roll at the dry end of the Fourdrinier wire. Even in the event, however, that the transfer of the wet web to the felt is made between two Fourdrinier wire, return rolls in the so-called free-wire transfer configuration (wherein no Fourdrinier return roll, or Couch roll, opposes the felt pickup roll), there are provided one or more sets of opposed press rolls in the felt section and/or at the surface of the Yankee dryer itself.

This latter press roll at theYankee dryer surface has been shown to have great importance because prior experience in papermaking has taught that eflicient drying is dependent on overall Web contact with the drying surface, obtained by pressing the entire web surface on the polished surface of the Yankee dryer.

Prior experience in papermaking has also taught the desirability of overall pressing operations to bring the individual fibers of the paper web into close physical contact prior to drying in order to achieve the prerequisite tensile strength in a paper sheet. Further, lack of pressing operations in conventional papermaking processes results in an excessive moisture removal function being transferred to the Yankee dryer, or steam can, drying section of the paper machine.

ICC

In accordance with the aforementioned pressing procedures, conventional papers receive an overall compaction of their structure prior to drying, which destroys the desirable combination of softness, bulk and absorbency characteristics found in the paper sheets of the instant invention.

As stated before, an attempt to approach the problem of creating bulky papers by eliminating the pressing operations creates drying problems and results in papers having somewhat less than the desired tensile strength for their intended use in tissue, towelling and sanitary products.

Contrary to the above stated limitations imposed by presently practicedv papermaking processes, applicants have discovered that the drying, compaction and tensile strength problems are concurrently solved by a papermaking process wherein, in the broadest sense, a paper web is laid down on a foraminous forming carrier (which can be, but is not necessarily, a selected imprinting fabric as defined herein), thermally pre-dryed to a fiber consistency substantially in excess of that normally entering the thermal drying section of a paper machine, imprinted with the knuckle pattern of a selected imprinting fabric and finally dryed without disturbing the imprinted knuckle pattern.

Applicants have found that this general procedure not only suffices to produce the desirable combination of softness, bulk and absorbency characteristics heretofore mentioned, but results in a high bulk, high porosity paper sheet which in creped form possesses substantially the same tensile strength as that of conventional paper of the same basis weight in creped form, even though tensile strength has not been developed by overall pressing. Applicants have also found that the paper sheets of this invention are especially adapted to use in paper towellings, sanitary tissues, facial tissues and like products where the softness, bulk, absorbency, and tensile strength characteristics are of value.

Applicants therefore state, while not wishing to be bound by theory, that in one sense, their invention is predicated on the discovery that the elimination of over- I all pressing operations on a wet paper web in favor of impressing a selected woven fabric imprint in the partially thermally dried web prior to final drying results in desirable bulk, softness and absorbency characteristics in a paper sheet.

' In another sense, the present invention is predicated on the discovery that, while retaining all of the qualities mentioned above, practice of the invention results in a unique ability to improve the surface apperance of towellings and tissues which are creped from a drying surface. For example, in the practice of the present invention, the crepe frequency and evenness of crepe can be regulated so that the creped products have enhanced uniformity of surface and overall appearance together with an improved surface feel. Moreover, the reduction in tensile strength normally caused by creping conventional paper sheets is minimized in the process of this invention.

An object of this invention is to provide a paper sheet having improved qualities of bulk, softness and absorbency for a given basis weight.

Another object of this invention is to provide a unique creped tissue sheet having increased caliper in relation to its web weight while maintaining prerequisite sheet strength.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a unique process for the manufacture of tissue and towelprocess for producing a creped paper sheet wherein the creping frequency and regularity in the sheet, as doctored from a creping surface, is controlled in the machine and cross-machine directions.

These and other objects will be made apparent by the accompanying drawings describing certain preferred embodiments and in the following detailed description of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic illustration of a papermaking machine in accordance with the invention.

FIGURE 2 is a schematic illustration of another papermaking machine embodying the invention.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged partial plan view of an uncreped paper sheet produced in accordance with the practice of the invention.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the uncreped, or machine glazed, paper sheet of FIGURE 3, taken in the cross-machine direction along the line 44 in FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged partial plan view of a creped paper sheet produced in accordance with the practice of the invention.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged cross sectional view of the creped paper sheet of FIGURE 5, taken in the crossmachine direction along the line 66 in FIGURE 5.

Referring to FIGURE 1, there is shown an example of a papermaking machine embodying the principles of the present invention. A papermaking furnish is delivered from a closed headbox 10 to a Fourdrinier wire 11.supported by a breast roll 12. An uncompacted paper web 13 is formed, and the Fourdrinier wire passes over forming boards 14, which are desirable, but not necessary. Toward the :dry end of the forming section, the Fourdrinier Wire 11 with the Wet paper web 13 supported thereon passes over a plurality of suction boxes 15. Five such suction boxes are shown in the illustration, the last four of which are desirably, but not necessarily, equipped with steam nozzles 16. After passing over the vacuum boxes the Fourdrinier Wire and the moist web pass around a Fourdrinier wire return roll 17 and downwardly between a slotted steam nozzle 18 and a vacuum box 19. At this point the paper web 13 is transferred without compaction to the selected imprinting fabric 20 and continues over an imprinting fabric return roll 21 to a hot air dryer 22. The imprinting fabric and the thermally pre-dryed paper web then pass over a straightening roll 23, which prevents the formation of wrinkles in the imprinting fabric, and over another imprinting fabric return roll 21 onto the surface of a Yankee dryer drum 24. The knuckles of the imprinting fabric 20 are then impressed into the pre-dryed but as yet uncompacted paper sheet 13 by the pressure roll 25. The imprinting fabric 20 then returns to the Fourdrinier wire 11 over several imprinting fabric return rolls 21, being washed free of clinging fibers by sprays 26 and dryed by vacuum box 27 during its return. The impressed paper sheet 13 continues from the impression nip roll along the periphery of the Yankee dryer drum 24 for drying and is desirably creped from the Yankee dryer surface by a doctor blade 28, but can be simply wound from the dryer surface, although these and subsequent operations are not considered essential steps in the present invention. If desired, the surface of the Yankee dryer can be sprayed with a small amount of adhesive solution from spnay 29 to improve the bond between the knuckle imprints of the paper sheet and the Yankee dryer surface during drying.

In FIGURE 2 there is depicted another example of a papermaking machine embodying the present invention. In this configuration a p-apermaking furnish is distributed directly on an imprinting fabric 30 by a headbox 31 as the imprinting fabric passes over a breast roll 32. In this manner and uncompacted wet paper web 33 is formed and dewatered by passing over vacuum boxes 34 to a hot air dryer 35, which thermally pre-drys the uncompacted paper web. The imprinting fabric 30', carrying the predryed sheet 33, now passes over a return roll 36 to carry the uncompacted, thermally pre-dryed sheet to the surface of a Yankee dryer drum 37. The thermally predryed sheet is then impressed with the knuckle pattern of the imprinting fabric by a pressure roll 38. The im printing fabric 30 then returns to the breast roll 32 of the forming section of the papermaking machine over a plurality of return rol-ls 36. During its return the imprinting fabric is cleaned by a shower 39 and dryed by a vacuum box 40. The dry sheet is wound from the surface of the Yankee dryer over a roll 41.

FIGURE 3 illustrates the remarkable regularity of the knuckle impressions 42 in machine glazed paper made by the process of the present invention, while FIGURE 4 shows the effect of the knuckle impressions 42 in bonding together at intervals the loose fibers 43 in the present paper sheet.

FIGURE 5 illustrates the striking regularity of creping frequency appearing in a creped sheet made by the process of the present invention. The surface of the creped paper sheet depicted in FIGURE 5 exhibits the characteristic regularity, both as to frequency and length, of creping folds 44 induced by the present process. The knuckle impressions 42 remain between the creping folds, and the creping folds, contrary to the creping folds in conventional creped paper, are substantially uninterrupted across the sheet surface. In FIGURE 6 a cross section of FIGURE 5 is used to show the desirable alignment of knuckle impressions 42 and loose fibers 43 in a creped sheet made by the process of the present invention.

As stated hereinbefore, the process of this invention may be generally described as a series of steps comprising (1) forming an uncompacted paper web on a forminous forming carrier, which can be a wire, a selected imprinting fabric of this invention or a perforated belt, (2) thermally pro-drying the paper web to a selected fiber consistency, (3) impressing the knuckle pattern, or warp and weft crossover points, of a selected imprinting fabric into the thermally pre-dryed paper web and (4) completely drying the imprinted paper web.

The first step is carried out by forming a paper web on conventional forming equipment, except that contrary to conventional practice no means involving mechanical compaction of the paper web, such as dandy rolls, felt pickup rolls or other means involving opposition of mechanical members, are employed to dewater the wet web. The initially formed paper web is dewatered by suction boxes or other similar vacuum devices, and is then transferred to a selected imprinting fabric, if the initial formation was not accomplished thereon, and thermally predryed in the second step. In the third step, the knuckle imprint of the selected imprinting fabric is impressed in the thermally pre-dryed paper web by any means of applying mechanical pressure prior to completing the drying of the pre-dryed sheet in the fourth step and carrying out any post-forming operation, such as creping on the dry sheet.

If desired, the knuckle imprint, mentioned above, can

be carried out by pressing an impression nip roll supporting the selected imprinting fabric and the thermally predryed, but as yet uncompacted, web against the face of a drying drum such as a Yankee dryer, with the thermally pre-dryed web next to the Yankee dryer surface. The moist webcan also be molded against and into the imprinting fabric by fluid pressure, for example, vacuum pressure prior to the thermal pre-drying. The dried paper can be doctored, or creped, from the Yankee surface. In this creping variation of the present process, a regulated creping pattern is attained according to the knuckle frequency or filament cross-over spacing of the imprinting fabric employed. This regulated creping pattern enhances the softness, b-ulk, absorbency and appearance impression of the finished product and avoids the substantial tensile strength loss caused by creping a conventional sheet which has been subjected to overall pressing.

The invention herein can also be practiced by fabric imprinting a paper web, thermally pre-dryed to the range of fiber consistencies prescribed herein, against any relatively non-yielding surface with the selected fabric, and subsequent drying can be carried out by any of the prior art methods which do not destroy the fabric impression, including, for example, festoon, steam can, tunnel or other conventional drying methods. One preferred drying procedure, for example, is accomplished by drying the imprinted paper web on the selected imprinting fabric by means of a hot air dryer.

The thermal pre-drying step can be accomplished by any method, but it is critical that the thermal pre-drying procedure does not destroy the relationship of the moist paper web with the selected imprinting fabric after it has been established.

Applicants have, therefore, made the unexpected discovery that forming an uncompacted web against a selected woven fabric by fluid pressure followed by imprinting the thermally pre-dryed Web with the knuckle pattern of a selected imprinting fabric and drying the imprinted sheet enhances the softness, bulk, absorbency and feel impression in a paper sheet. In one embodiment, the inventive process also results in regulated creping frequency to further enhance the above desirable sheet characteristics.

Accordingly, the process of the present invention can be practiced by forming a paper web having a dry basis weight of about 5 to about 40, preferably about 9 to about 25, pounds per 3000 square feet, depending on the desired product weight and application, on a conventional Fourdrinier or other conventional forming section. The paper web is then dewatered by multiple vacuum boxes which preferably increase their application of vacuum in the machine direction as the sheet is dewatered. When used in the preferred manner, the multiple vacuum boxes apply vacuum to the wet paper web in successive applications increasing in degree from a vacuum equivalent of about 2 inches of Hg differential in pressure to about 25 inches of Hg differential in pressure. This dewatering produces a moist web having a fiber consistency of about 10 percent to about 25 percent, and the application of successive increasing vacuums avoids compaction of the paper web.

The moist paper web is then transferred from the Fourdrinier wire, or other foraminous forming wire, to a selected imprinting fabric having about 20 to about 60 meshes per inch formed from filaments having diameters of about 0.008 to about 0.02 inch. In selecting imprinting fabrics for use in the process of this invention it is generally desirable to select coarser imprinting fabrics for use with heavier basis weights, although this choice may not be absolutely necessary to result in a desirable product.

The transfer of the moist paper web from the foraminous forming wire to the selected imprinting fabric can be accomplished in certain instances by simply contacting the moist paper web on the foraminous forming wire with the imprinting fabric. These instances of easy transfer of the moist paper web occur, generally, in the artexpected cases where the foraminous forming wire is coarser than the imprinting fabric. This follows the general papermaking premise that moist paper web transfer can be made from coarser to smoother surfaces.

In most cases, however, applicants have experienced considerable difficulty in transferring the moist uncompacted paper web to the imprinting fabric. To overcome this problem a variety of means of applying fluid pressure to effect sheet transfer can be used in the practice of this invention. For example, the moist web can be transferred to the imprinting fabric by juxtaposing the foraminous forming wire and the imprinting fabric with the moist web between and directing steam from a slot nozzle across the web width against the outside surface of the foraminous forming wire. A vacuum box having a slot nozzle across the width of the web can also be applied to the outer surface of the imprintjng fabric. In some instances, the action of either the steam nozzle or the vacuum box is sufiicient to urge the moist paper web away from the foraminous forming wire and onto the imprinting fabric. In other instances both devices are required to effect the transfer. It is noted that, although steam and air, individually and in combination, have been disclosed above as transfer means for the moist paper web, other fluid means, including gases and liquids, are applicable to effect transfer.

The imprinting fabric, in addition to having the mesh, or filament, frequencies and diameters noted above, can be of square or diagonal weave. The imprinting fabric can also be of any specific construction, for example, single or double crimped, twilled and semi-twilled imprinting fabrics formed of monofilament or multifilament strands are suitable for use in the practice of this invention.

It is also understood that various materials can be used in the construction of the imprinting fabric, including the metal wires used in the construction of Fourdrinier wires. For example, the polyamide fibers, vinyl fibers, acrylic fibers and polyester fibers sold under the respective trademarks of nylon, Saran, Orlon, and Dacron are all suitable for the construction of the imprinting fabrics.

The moist paper web, carried on the imprinting fabric can be thermally pre-dryed by means of passing hot gases, for example air, through the moist paper web and the imprinting fabric. Thermal pre-drying may also be accomplished, the moist paper web remaining in undisturbed relation with the selected imprinting fabric, by infrared heaters, by conventional 'hot air systems, or by any other means known to the art.

The means by which the thermal pre-drying is accomplished is not critical; it is, however, critical that the relationship of the moist web to the imprinting fabric be maintained once established.

Thermal pre-drying is used to effect a fiber consistency in the moist paper web from about 30% to about preferably about 40% to about 80%. Applicants have found that at fiber consistencies less than about 30% the desirably balanced sheet characteristics of softness, bulk, and absorbency suffer because the sheet and the fibers thereof are too moist and yielding in the next process step; namely, the imprinting step. On the other hand, applicants have found that pre-drying to fiber consistencies above about 80% precludes the development of effective tensile strengths in the imprinted paper sheet.

The fiber consistencies, set forth above, are, therefore, critical to the next step in the process which comprises imprinting the imprinting fabric knuckle pattern in the moist web by pressing the pre-dryed web against a relatively non-yielding surface, for example, an unheated steel roll or a Yankee dryer surface, while the pre-dryed web is yet carried on the imprinting fabric. Imprinting the fabric knuckle pattern results in a paper sheet having impressed in its surface, to a depth of at least 30% of its machine glazed caliper the knuckle pattern of an imprinting fabric. Machine glazed caliper refers to the caliper of the paper sheet taken directly from the Yankee dryer, before creping, as machine glazed paper. The imprinting step further results in the creation of a regular pattern of small transluscent areas in the pre-dryed web. The pressure required for the imprinting of the imprinting fabric pattern can be provided by one or more pressure rolls operating on the impinting fabric to force the knuckles of the fabric into the surface of the pre-dryed web and to force the pre-dryed web surface under the knuckles against the Yankee dryer surface. These pressure rolls can be fabricated of steel, composition or rubber and are operated at knuckle pressures of about 1000 p.s.i. to about 12,000 p.s.i. based on the knuckle impression area of the selected imprinting fabric.

It will be understood that it is critical in the process of the present invention that the imprinting step in the process, detailed above, is the first substantial overall mechanical compaction step which the paper web has received during formation and pre-drying.

In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, as stated above, the relatively non-yielding surface is a Yankee dryer surface, and the imprinted sheet is removed therefrom after final drying as machine glazed paper.

In another preferred embodiment, the relatively nonyielding surface is also a Yankee dryer drum and the imprinted sheet is pressed and dried thereon and creped therefrom. In this preferred embodiment, there accrues an added product advantage stemming from the fact that the impressed fabric pattern has been found to beneficially control the character and frequency of creping. Specifically, applicants have found that, when the dried paper web is creped from the drying surface on which it was imprinted, the resulting creping pattern is influenced or regulated in the machine direction and cross-machine direction by the knuckle pattern or filament frequency of the imprinting fabric pattern so that a distinctive regularity is evidenced in both the frequency and the uniformity of the creping ridges. In fact, the creping ridges of the present paper sheet are substantially unbroken across the sheet, whereas the creping ridges of conventional creped papers are interrupted and broken in a random pattern. Applicants have also discovered that the tensile strength of paper sheets imprinted on a dryer surface in practicing this embodiment is less reduced by creping than is the case in normal papermaking practice. The dried machine glazed or creped paper products produced can then be handled by conventional finishing techniques, including, for example, multia-plying, or subjected to further post-forming treatments.

It will be apparent to those versed in the art, that, since the imprinting fabric pattern can be employed to regulate creping, the advantages of creping are maximized in comparison to the conventional random system. It is equally apparent that the choice of imprinting fabric within the ranges and types disclosed will produce slightly different effects or influence creping in various patterns desirable according to the product type and basis weight.

In other embodiments, the imprinted pre-dryed paper web is finally dried on the imprinting fabric (there being no transfer to another drying surface at the imprinting pressure roll). The pre-dryed paper web can also be dried without creping after imprinting by means of a tunnel dryer, festoon dryer, hot air dryer, or other conventional drying equipment.

From the foregoing general and specific description of the present process, it is apparent that the critical procedures to be carried out are the formation of an uncompacted web at a specified range of fiber consistency and the imprinting thereof by the knuckles of a selected imprinting fabric. The formation of the paper web :and the final drying techniques together with the pre-drying, imprinting and creping procedures can be varied by one skilled in the art to produce distinctive papers for various uses while remaining within the scope of this invention.

By the foregoing procedures, paper sheets composed substantially of cellulosic fibers having basis weights of about to about 40 pounds per 3000 square feet and a repeating pattern of discrete impressed areas are produced. The aforementioned discrete impressed areas have a relative density of at least about 0.7, preferably about 0.8, with visible transparentizing in the impressed areas. The discrete impressed areas 42, illustrated in FIGURES 3, 4 and 6, comprise a total area of about 1% to about 14% of the surface area of the paper sheets before creping and define bulky absorbent areas of loose fibers 43 in the paper sheets having dimensions of about to about 90% of the average fiber length of the cellulosic fibers contained therein.

The paper sheets of this invention are further characterized by having, as defined below, bulk densities at grams per square inch loading of about 1.0 gram per cubic inch to about 3.6 grams per cubic inch, prop0rtion al to their basis weight and by having compressive work values (CWVs) in inch-grams of about 0.4 to about 0.7, inversely proportional to their bulk densities. The paper sheets also exhibit absorbencies in grams of water per gram of fiber of about 6 to about 17, inversely proportional to their basis weight in addition to relatively high absorbency rates.

As stated before, when the impressed fibrous sheets are creped, there is added to the above product characteristics the feature of controlling both the machine direction and the cross-machine direction regularity of the creping frequency. In particular, it is noted that creped sheets manufactured in accordance with the present process are characterized by creping folds which are substantially uninterrupted across the sheet surface.

The CWV numbers reported in the tables of examples hereinbelow define the compressive deformation characteristics (sponginess as part of a total impression of softness to a person who handles the paper) of a paper sheet loaded on its opposing flat surfaces. The significance of the CWV number is better understood by the realization that the CWV number represents the total work required to compress the surfaces of a single flat paper sheet inwardly toward each other to a unit load of 100 grams per square inch. In accomplishing the foregoing compression test, the thickness of the paper sheet is decreased, and work is done. This work, or expended energy, is similar to the work done by a person who pinches the flat surfaces of a flat sheet of paper between his thumb and forefinger to gain an impression of its softness. Applicants have found that CWV nu mbers correlate well with the softness impression obtained by a person who handles a paper sheet.

An Instron Tester (Model No. TM, Serial No. 261) was used to measure the CWV numbers by placing a single, 4 square inch paper sheet between compression plates. The sample was then loaded on its flat opposing surfaces at a rate of 0.02 inch of compression deformation per minute until the loading per square inch reached 100 grams.

The Instron Tester is equipped with a recording unit which integrates the compression movement of the sheet surfaces and the instantaneous loading to give the total work in inch-grams required to reach the 100 grams per square inch loading. This work expressed as inch-grams is the CWV number used herein.

The caliper of a paper sheet at 100 grams per square inch as tabulated in the table hereinbelow is the thickness of that sheet when subjected to a compressive load of 100 grams per square inch.

The bulk density of 100 grams per square inch is calculated from the weight of a given area of the paper sheet and the caliper of the paper sheet at 100 grams per square inch as set forth above. The bulk density values tabulated in the table hereinbelow are computed as the weight in grams of one cubic inch of the paper sample under a compressive loading of 100 grams per square inch.

The tensile strengths, machine direction (MD) or cross machine direction (CD), tabulated in the table hereinbelow are reported as the force in grams that a one inch wide sample with a 4-inch span between the tensile tester clamps, cut in the MD or CD direction, can withstand before breaking as measured on a standard Thwing-Albert Tensile Tester.

The absorbencies tabulated in the table below are reported as the total weight of water which an unstressed paper sample, weighing approximately 3 grams and composed of sheets of paper out to measure 4 inches by 4 inches after conditioning for at least 12 hours at 72 F. and 50% relative humidity, will hold, expressed as grams of water per gram of conditioned fiber.

Having described the process and product of this invention, the following examples are intended to illustrate modes of advantageous operation, but it will be understood that those skilled in the art will immediately be aware of other advantages stemming from the herein disclosed inventive concept. It is understood, therefore, that the examples are intended to be illustrative and not limiting, and the scope of invention is only to be construed by the scope of the appended claims.

7 EXAMPLE I A pulp slurry having a 03% fiber consistency and containing 35% bleached northern softwood kraft and 65% bleached poplar sulfite, prerefined at 3.5% consistency in a conventional conical pulp refiner at 100 kw.-hr./ton, was distributed by a conventional closed hydraulic headbox on a horizontal bronze mesh Fourdrinier wire woven with 95 warp and 100 weft strands per inch moving continuously at 500 f.p.m. Flow and wire movement were regulated so that a uniform moist paper web, having a dry basis weight of 9.6 pounds per 3000-square feet, was formed on this wire. Water was removed from the web until the fiber consistency was 25% by the following successive devices located along the Fourdrinier wire: (1) a forming board contacting the under side of the wire with a deflecting face at 30 to the wire and a trailing face departing from the wire at a 1 angle; (2) a forming board contacting the under side of the wire with a defleeting face at an angle of 45 to the wire and a trailing face departing from the wire at an angle of 1; (3) five successive vacuum boxes contacting the under side of the wire with vacuums equivalent to 3" of Hg, 8.5" of Hg, 14.5" of Hg, 15" of Hg and 17" of Hg differential in pressure, respectively toward the dry end of the Fourdrinier wire. Four slit orifice steam nozzles with a continuous 0.025" aperture were mounted transversely to the machine direction /2" above the wire and supplied with dry steam in a manner to cause the steam jets to be directed at the apertures of the last four vacuum boxes at rates of fiow adjusted to give a small amount of visible steam in excess of the amount pulled through the web into the vacuum boxes. The forming wire was then turned downwardly at an angle of 45 by a turn roll for a span of 2 feet and then returned by means of another turn roll. Midway along the unsupported wire span between these rolls, the moist web at 25% fiber consistency was transferred to a second and coarser square mesh imprint ing fabric having a 34% open area woven with 35 warp strands per inch made of 0.0135 diameter crimped nylon monofilament and 35 weft strands per inch similar to the warp strands, particularly in that they were crimped to the same degree, with a diameter of 0.0135". A turn roll was placed so that the nylon fabric converged upon the Fourdrinier wire at a 1 angle to the Wire while moving at the same speed and was brought into contact with the moist web at a point 3" past the midway point of the wire span by means of a vacuum box mounted on the opposite side of the imprinting fabric from the web as shown in FIGURE 1. The transfer was accomplished by directing a steam jet from a 0.25 wide slit nozzle, mounted midway in the wire span transversely below and in near contact with the Fourdrinier wire against the moist web at an angle of 45 to the downwardly moving wire.

The action of the steam jet impinging on the moist web through the wire openings disengaged the moist web from the forming carrier and forced it against the described r 10 angle of 5, and the vacuum box position was adjusted so that the point of departure of the imprinting fabric from the Fourdrinier wire occurred at the trailing edge of the vacuum box slit.

The moist web on the imprinting fabric was then predryed to a fiber consistency of 30% by passing hot air through the imprinting fabric and the moist web. The fabric carrying the molded and pre-dryed paper web was then brought into contact with an adhesive coated, S-foot diameter, Yankee dryer drum at a point 1.5 feet ahead of a pressure nip formed by a 14-inch diameter roll covered with 1 inch of rubber having a A; inch ball P&J hardness of 27. This nip was operated at a knuckle pressure of 2900 psi. to imprint the pre-dryed web with the knuckle pattern of the imprinting fabric. Prior to the point of contacting the Yankee dryer, the nylon fabric contacted a curved axis rotating rubber roll with a 30 wrap to keep it free of wrinkles. The 1.5 feet of Yankee dryer surface contact prior to the pressure nip provided time for pre-cooling the Yankee dryer surface to avoid blistering the sheet by sudden formation of steam bubbles on the Yankee dryer surface.

The adhesive coat on the Yankee dryer surface was spray applied at the rate of 0.03 cc. per square foot per minute and was formulated from a liquid animal glue, a liquid polyamide wet strength resin, glycerine and water such that the mixture contained 5 parts animal glue, 0.1 part wet strength resin, 1 part glycerine and 93.9 parts water.

The pre-dryed and imprinted web was caused to part from the imprinting fabric at the pressure nip exit and adhere to the Yankee dryer surface by means of the adhesive coat described. During the return of the imprinting fabric to the point of contact with the Fourdrinier wire, it was washed with two showers to remove any adhering fiber, and partially dried by means of a vacuum box, operated at a vacuum equivalent to 2 inches of Hg differential pressure. The second of the two showers was supplied with water containing 2 p.p.m. non-ionic surfactant. This shower'cleaningwas neces sary' to keep the imprinting fabric return rolls from becoming coated with fiber and to keep the openings of the fabric free from fiber so that uniform web transfer and release were maintained in this continuousprocess.

The imprinted paper web adhering to the hot Yankee dryer drum was dried at 500 f.p.m. to a consistency of 96% and removed from the drum by means of a conventional creping doctor blade. The angle between the impact face of the 0.050 inch thick doctor blade and the tangent to the Yankee at its contact was 81. Samples were also taken from the Yankee dryer drum without creping, as machine glazed paper. Drying on the Yankee dryer was accomplished by heating the drum with steam at 63 p.s.i.g. while impinging air against the web at 300 F. and removing it with a conventional air hood at the rate of 900 pounds per square foot of hood area per hour over approximately one half of the circumference of the dryer, while the imprinted web con-- tacted three quarters of the dryer circumference.

The dry creped sheet was removed from the doctor blade at 430 f.p.m. by the reel so that the product had 14% stretch as crepe folds, a basis weight of 11 pounds per 3000 square feet and 8% imprinted area. The creped paper product formed by the process of Example I had exceptional utility for use as sanitary tissue.

A paper sheet having substantially the same machine glazed and creped basis weight as that of Example I was produced by conventional papermaking techniques to provide direct comparison of sheet qualities. Conventional papermakingtechniques used to produce the comparison papers were those wherein the paper web was formed on a Fourdrinier wire, transferred from the Fourdrinier wire onto a felt instead of the imprinting fabric of this invention, pressed in a conventional felt press and transferred to the Yankee dryer without predrying. The table below compares the sheet properties and processing conditions of the Example I sheet of this invention with those of the conventionally produced sheet. For more direct comparison of the sheet properties developed by the process of this invention, all of the sheet properties are tabulated as machine glazed sheet properties, except where creping is specifically noted, to avoid the factor introduced into the paper sheets by more or less creping. The creped sample values are given at about 14% crepe. The sheet properties and processing conditions of additional sheets forming basis for Examples II to IX and produced by the process of Example I, with the exception of basis weight, fiber consistency before transfer to the Yankee dryer, knuckle pressure, wire mesh and filament diameter as noted in the table, are compared with conventionally produced sheets of substantially the same basis weight.

Substantially the same results are obtained when an imprinting fabric woven with strands of crimped nylon monofilament having a diameter of 0.008 inch in both the warp and weft directions is used in Example VI.

The data presented in the table above clearly show the advantages of the present process in producing a paper sheet characterized by softness, bulkiness and high absorbency. The data also show that the tensile strength of a sheet produced by the process of this invention is less affected by creping than that of a conventionally produced sheet.

What is claimed is:

1. A process for the manufacture of a soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet which comprises the steps of (1) forming an uncompacted paper web having a uniform basis weight of about 5 to about 40 pounds per 3000 square feet, (2) supporting said uncompacted paper Web TABLE.CO1\IPARISON OF SHEET PROPERTIES AND PROCESSING CONDITIONS Example Comparison Values Conventional I II III Basis Weight, sp. pounds/3,000 sq. ft .r 9. 9 9 6 9.1 9. 0 Fiber Consistency Before First Press 8. 0 Fiber Consistency Before Imprinting on Yankee Dryer, percen 40 58 40 Knuckle Pressure, psi 2, 900 1, 500 1, 550 Imprinted Areas, percent 100 7. 2 9. 6 9. 3 Imprinting Fabric, Meshes/Inc I 35 35 35 Fabric Crimp I I I I I .r 3 Fabric Filament Diameter, Inches 0.0135 0.0140 0, 0140 Bulk Density at 100 gm./sq. in 5. 22 1.03 1.16 1.12 CWV, Ineh- Grams 0.10 0. 48 0. 68 0. 63 Absorbeney, gm. H O/gm fiber 5. 5 6.3 12.6 11.9 Caliper at 100 gm./sq in Inches 0.0020 0. 0099 O. 0082 0. 0084 Tensile MD, gm./1nch 880 570 440 460 Tensile CD, gm./inch 230 150 Creped Tensile MD, gm./1neh 210 324 170 260 Creped Tensile CD, gm./incl1 80 77 30 50 Product Utility l-ply sanitary tissue Example Comparison Values Conven- Example Conventional IV tional V VI Basis Weight, sp. pounds/3000 sq. ft Fiber Consistency Before First Pres Fiber Consistency Before Imprinting Knuckle Pressure, psi... Imprinted Areas, Percent Imprinting Fabric Meshes/ Absorbency, gm. I-I Caliper at gut/sq. in., Tnche Tensile MD, gmJinch- Tensile CD, gin/inch- Creped Tensile MD, gm.

Creped Tensile CD, gm./incl1 3 20 290 210 Product Utility 2-p1y Z-ply paper towel sanitary tissue Example Comparison Values Conven- Example Conventional VII tional VIII IX Basis Weight, sp. pounds/3000 fq, ft Fiber Consistency Before First Press Fiber Consistency Before Imprinting on Yankee Dryer, percent Knuckle Pressure, p s i Imprinted Areas, percent Imprinting Fabric, Meshes/Inch Fabric Cr p Fabric Filament Diameter, Inches Bulk Density at 100 gm./sq. in CWV, Inch-Grams Absorbency, gm. H O/gm. fiber Caliper at 100 gin/sq. in., Inches Tensile MD, gm./inch Tensile CD, gm./im-h Creped Tensile MD, gmJinch Creped Tensile CD, grIL/inch Product Utility 1 Felt. 2 Single. 3 Double.

1, 530 1, 41 l-ply paper towel on an imprinting fabric having about 20 to about 60 meshes per inch, said imprinting fabric being formed from filaments having a diameter of about 0.008 to about 0.02 inch, (3) thermally pre-drying said uncompacted paper Web to a fiber consistency of about 30% to about 80%, (4) imprinting the knuckle pattern of said im printing fabric in the pre-dryed uncompacted paper web at a knuckle pressure of about 1000 p.s.i. to about 12,000 p.s.i. and (5) final drying the paper sheet so formed.

2. The process for the manufacture of a soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet as described in claim 1 wherein the final drying of the paper sheet is performed on the imprinting fabric.

3. A process for the manufacture of a soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet which comprises the steps of (1) forming an uncompacted paper web having a uniform basis weight of about 9 to about 25 pounds per 3000 square feet, (2) supporting said paper Web on an imprinting fabric having about 20 to about 60 meshes per inch, said imprinting fabric being formed from filaments having a diameter of about 0.008 to about 0.02 inch, (.3) thermally pre-drying said uncompacted paper web to. a fiber consistency of about 40% to about 80%, (4) imprinting the knuckle pattern of said imprinting fabric in the pre-dryed paper web at a knuckle pressure of about 1000 p.s.i. to about 12,000 p.s.i. and (5) final drying the paper sheet so formed on a Yankee dryer drum.

4. The process for the manufacture of a soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet as described in claim 3 wherein the uncompacted paper Web formed in step 1 is molded to conform to the pattern of the imprinting fabric prior to thermally pre-drying the uncompacted web in step 3.

5. A soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet characterized by having a uniform basis weight of about 5 to about 40 pounds per 3000 square feet, by having impressed in its surface, to a depth of at least 30% of its machine glazed caliper the knuckle pattern of an imprinting fabric having about 20 to about 60 meshes per inch, by having about 1% to about 14% of its surface compressed in said knuckle pattern to a relative density of at least 0.7 and said soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet being further characterized by having a bulk density at 100 grams per square inch loading of about 1.0 to about 3.6, proportional to its basis weight.

6. The soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet described in claim 5 which has been creped and exhibits creping folds which are substantially unbroken across the paper sheet together with a distinctive regularity in its machine and cross-machine creping frequency influenced by the mesh frequency of the imprinting fabric.

7. A soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet characterized by having a uniform basis weight of about 9 to about 25 pounds per 3000 square feet, by having impressed in its surface, to a depth of at least 30% of its machine glazed caliper the transparentized knuckle pattern of an imprinting fabric having about 20 to about meshes per inch, by having about 1% to about 14% of its surface compressed in said knuckle pattern to a relative density of about 0.8 and said soft, bulky and absorbent paper sheet being further characterized by having a bulk density at grams per square inch loading of about 1.0 gram per cubic inch to about 3.6 grams per cubic inch, proportional to its basis weight, by having a total work in inch-grams to reach a 100 gram per square inch loading on its flat opposing surfaces at a rate of 0.02 inch of compression deformation per minute of about 0.4 to about 0.7, inversely proportional to its bulk density and an absorbency in grams of water per gram of fiber of about 6 to about 17, inversely proportional to its basis weight.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 733,709 7/1903 Farwell 162362 X 3,103,461 9/1963 Smith et a1. 162116 3,230,136 1/1966 Krake 162111 DONALL H. SYLVESTER, Primary Examiner.

s. LEON BASI-IORE, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US733709 *Aug 20, 1902Jul 14, 1903Thilmany Pulp & Paper CompanyPaper-making machine.
US3103461 *Dec 19, 1958Sep 10, 1963 Battery separator and method for manufacture thereof
US3230136 *May 22, 1964Jan 18, 1966Kimberly Clark CoPatterned tissue paper containing heavy basis weight ribs and fourdrinier wire for forming same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3511751 *May 29, 1967May 12, 1970Toyo Tire & Rubber CoMethod of modifying cellulose xanthate paper prior to in situ regeneration by embossing and product thereby
US3537954 *May 8, 1967Nov 3, 1970Beloit CorpPapermaking machine
US3629056 *Apr 3, 1969Dec 21, 1971Beloit CorpApparatus for forming high bulk tissue having a pattern imprinted thereon
US3862877 *May 22, 1972Jan 28, 1975Buckeye Cellulose CorpClothlike tissue laminates
US3905863 *Apr 1, 1974Sep 16, 1975Procter & GambleProcess for forming absorbent paper by imprinting a semi-twill fabric knuckle pattern thereon prior to final drying and paper thereof
US3926716 *Mar 19, 1974Dec 16, 1975Procter & GambleTransfer and adherence of relatively dry paper web to a rotating cylindrical surface
US3974025 *Jun 19, 1975Aug 10, 1976The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent paper having imprinted thereon a semi-twill, fabric knuckle pattern prior to final drying
US3994771 *May 30, 1975Nov 30, 1976The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for forming a layered paper web having improved bulk, tactile impression and absorbency and paper thereof
US4100017 *Sep 20, 1976Jul 11, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-ply tissue product
US4102737 *May 16, 1977Jul 25, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess and apparatus for forming a paper web having improved bulk and absorptive capacity
US4113911 *Nov 15, 1976Sep 12, 1978The Buckeye Cellulose CorporationQuiet, strong cloth-like tissue laminate
US4120747 *Jul 18, 1977Oct 17, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanyUse of ozone treated chemithermomechanical pulp in a high bulk tissue papermaking process
US4125430 *Apr 22, 1977Nov 14, 1978Scott Paper CompanyAir decompaction of paper webs
US4125659 *Jun 1, 1976Nov 14, 1978American Can CompanyPatterned creping of fibrous products
US4127637 *Mar 13, 1975Nov 28, 1978Scott Paper Co.Method of manufacturing a dry-formed, embossed adhesively bonded, nonwoven fibrous sheet
US4157938 *Apr 21, 1977Jun 12, 1979The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod and apparatus for continuously expelling an atomized stream of water from a moving fibrous web
US4191609 *Mar 9, 1979Mar 4, 1980The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft absorbent imprinted paper sheet and method of manufacture thereof
US4196045 *Apr 3, 1978Apr 1, 1980Beloit CorporationMethod and apparatus for texturizing and softening non-woven webs
US4239792 *Feb 5, 1979Dec 16, 1980The Procter & Gamble CompanySurface wiping device
US4308092 *May 7, 1976Dec 29, 1981Rohm And Haas CompanyCreping paper using cationic water soluble addition
US4309246 *Aug 14, 1978Jan 5, 1982Crown Zellerbach CorporationPapermaking apparatus and method
US4406737 *Sep 11, 1981Sep 27, 1983Rohm And Haas CompanyCreping paper using cationic water soluble addition polymer
US4440597 *Mar 15, 1982Apr 3, 1984The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet-microcontracted paper and concomitant process
US4448638 *Sep 29, 1982May 15, 1984James River-Dixie/Northern, Inc.Paper webs having high bulk and absorbency and process and apparatus for producing the same
US4464224 *Jun 30, 1982Aug 7, 1984Cip Inc.Process for manufacture of high bulk paper
US4469735 *Mar 15, 1982Sep 4, 1984The Procter & Gamble CompanyExtensible multi-ply tissue paper product
US4482429 *Sep 29, 1982Nov 13, 1984James River-Norwalk, Inc.Paper webs having high bulk and absorbency and process and apparatus for producing the same
US4507351 *Jan 11, 1983Mar 26, 1985The Proctor & Gamble CompanyStrong laminate
US4529480 *Aug 23, 1983Jul 16, 1985The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper
US4551199 *Jul 1, 1982Nov 5, 1985Crown Zellerbach CorporationApparatus and process for treating web material
US4556450 *Dec 30, 1982Dec 3, 1985The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of and apparatus for removing liquid for webs of porous material
US4637859 *Mar 27, 1985Jan 20, 1987The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper
US4808266 *May 12, 1987Feb 28, 1989La Cellulose Du PinProcedure and device for the elimination of liquid from a layer formed especially through a paper procuding process
US4834838 *Feb 20, 1987May 30, 1989James River CorporationFibrous tape base material
US4940513 *Dec 5, 1988Jul 10, 1990The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for preparing soft tissue paper treated with noncationic surfactant
US4959125 *Dec 5, 1988Sep 25, 1990The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft tissue paper containing noncationic surfactant
US5059282 *Feb 21, 1990Oct 22, 1991The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft tissue paper
US5098519 *Oct 30, 1989Mar 24, 1992James River CorporationMethod for producing a high bulk paper web and product obtained thereby
US5098522 *Jun 29, 1990Mar 24, 1992The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using a textured casting surface
US5126015 *Dec 12, 1990Jun 30, 1992James River Corporation Of VirginiaMethod for simultaneously drying and imprinting moist fibrous webs
US5160789 *Dec 28, 1989Nov 3, 1992The Procter & Gamble Co.Fibers and pulps for papermaking based on chemical combination of poly(acrylate-co-itaconate), polyol and cellulosic fiber
US5164046 *May 7, 1991Nov 17, 1992The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making soft tissue paper using polysiloxane compound
US5211815 *Mar 20, 1992May 18, 1993James River CorporationForming fabric for use in producing a high bulk paper web
US5213588 *Apr 14, 1992May 25, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbrasive wiping articles and a process for preparing such articles
US5215626 *Jul 19, 1991Jun 1, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for applying a polysiloxane to tissue paper
US5217576 *Nov 1, 1991Jun 8, 1993Dean Van PhanSoft absorbent tissue paper with high temporary wet strength
US5223092 *Apr 30, 1991Jun 29, 1993James River CorporationFibrous paper cover stock with textured surface pattern and method of manufacturing the same
US5223096 *Nov 1, 1991Jun 29, 1993Procter & Gamble CompanySoft absorbent tissue paper with high permanent wet strength
US5227242 *Jun 6, 1990Jul 13, 1993Kimberly-Clark CorporationMultifunctional facial tissue
US5230776 *Jul 14, 1992Jul 27, 1993Valmet Paper Machinery, Inc.Paper machine for manufacturing a soft crepe paper web
US5240562 *Oct 27, 1992Aug 31, 1993Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper products containing a chemical softening composition
US5246545 *Aug 27, 1992Sep 21, 1993Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for applying chemical papermaking additives from a thin film to tissue paper
US5246546 *Aug 27, 1992Sep 21, 1993Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for applying a thin film containing polysiloxane to tissue paper
US5248309 *Mar 20, 1992Sep 28, 1993Kimberly-Clark CorporationThin sanitary napkin having a central absorbent zone and a method of forming the napkin
US5260171 *Dec 20, 1991Nov 9, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using a textured casting surface
US5262007 *Apr 9, 1992Nov 16, 1993Procter & Gamble CompanySoft absorbent tissue paper containing a biodegradable quaternized amine-ester softening compound and a temporary wet strength resin
US5264082 *Apr 9, 1992Nov 23, 1993Procter & Gamble CompanySoft absorbent tissue paper containing a biodegradable quaternized amine-ester softening compound and a permanent wet strength resin
US5275700 *Jun 29, 1990Jan 4, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using a deformable casting surface
US5279767 *Oct 27, 1992Jan 18, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyChemical softening composition useful in fibrous cellulosic materials
US5306395 *Apr 5, 1993Apr 26, 1994Valmet-Karlstad AbC-wrap type twin wire former
US5312522 *Jan 14, 1993May 17, 1994Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper products containing a biodegradable chemical softening composition
US5314584 *Dec 17, 1992May 24, 1994James River CorporationFibrous paper cover stock with textured surface pattern and method of manufacturing the same
US5326434 *May 7, 1993Jul 5, 1994Scott Paper CompanyCreping adhesive formulation
US5334286 *May 13, 1993Aug 2, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper treated with tri-component biodegradable softener composition
US5334289 *Jun 15, 1992Aug 2, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using differential light transmission techniques
US5336373 *Dec 29, 1992Aug 9, 1994Scott Paper CompanyMethod for making a strong, bulky, absorbent paper sheet using restrained can drying
US5354425 *Dec 13, 1993Oct 11, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper treated with polyhydroxy fatty acid amide softener systems that are biodegradable
US5364504 *Apr 12, 1993Nov 15, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using a textured casting surface
US5366785 *Oct 1, 1993Nov 22, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having pressure differential induced protuberances and a process of making such cellulosic fibrous structures
US5383778 *Sep 4, 1990Jan 24, 1995James River Corporation Of VirginiaStrength control embossing apparatus
US5385642 *May 13, 1993Jan 31, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for treating tissue paper with tri-component biodegradable softener composition
US5385643 *Mar 10, 1994Jan 31, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for applying a thin film containing low levels of a functional-polysiloxane and a nonfunctional-polysiloxane to tissue paper
US5389204 *Mar 10, 1994Feb 14, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for applying a thin film containing low levels of a functional-polysiloxane and a mineral oil to tissue paper
US5397435 *Oct 22, 1993Mar 14, 1995Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-ply facial tissue paper product comprising chemical softening compositions and binder materials
US5397437 *Jan 31, 1994Mar 14, 1995Valmet-Karlstad AbMethod of rebuilding a conventional tissue machine to a TAD machine
US5399412 *May 21, 1993Mar 21, 1995Kimberly-Clark CorporationUncreped throughdried towels and wipers having high strength and absorbency
US5405501 *Jun 30, 1993Apr 11, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-layered tissue paper web comprising chemical softening compositions and binder materials and process for making the same
US5415737 *Sep 20, 1994May 16, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper products containing a biodegradable vegetable oil based chemical softening composition
US5427696 *Jan 14, 1993Jun 27, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyBiodegradable chemical softening composition useful in fibrous cellulosic materials
US5429686 *Apr 12, 1994Jul 4, 1995Lindsay Wire, Inc.Apparatus for making soft tissue products
US5437766 *Oct 22, 1993Aug 1, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-ply facial tissue paper product comprising biodegradable chemical softening compositions and binder materials
US5443899 *Jun 2, 1992Aug 22, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibers and pulps for papermaking based on chemical combination of poly(acrylate-co-itaconate), polyol and cellulosic fiber
US5454405 *Aug 23, 1994Oct 3, 1995Albany International Corp.Triple layer papermaking fabric including top and bottom weft yarns interwoven with a warp yarn system
US5474689 *Nov 2, 1994Dec 12, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyWaterless self-emulsifiable chemical softening composition useful in fibrous cellulosic materials
US5487813 *Dec 2, 1994Jan 30, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyStrong and soft creped tissue paper and process for making the same by use of biodegradable crepe facilitating compositions
US5490902 *Oct 18, 1994Feb 13, 1996James River Corporation Of VirginiaStrength control embossing and paper product produced thereby
US5494731 *May 4, 1994Feb 27, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper treated with nonionic softeners that are biodegradable
US5495678 *Feb 24, 1994Mar 5, 1996Valmet Paper Machinery, Inc.Drying module and dryer sections that make use of same, in particular for a high-speed paper machine
US5510000 *Sep 20, 1994Apr 23, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper products containing a vegetable oil based chemical softening composition
US5510001 *Sep 14, 1994Apr 23, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationMethod for increasing the internal bulk of throughdried tissue
US5514523 *Dec 20, 1993May 7, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using differential light transmission techniques
US5520778 *Aug 9, 1994May 28, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having pressure differential induced protuberances and a process of making such cellulosic fibrous structures
US5525345 *Mar 6, 1995Jun 11, 1996The Proctor & Gamble CompanyLotion composition for imparting soft, lubricious feel to tissue paper
US5529664 *May 26, 1995Jun 25, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using differential light transmission techniques
US5538595 *May 17, 1995Jul 23, 1996The Proctor & Gamble CompanyChemically softened tissue paper products containing a ploysiloxane and an ester-functional ammonium compound
US5554467 *May 25, 1995Sep 10, 1996The Proctor & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using differential light transmission techniques
US5569358 *Jun 1, 1994Oct 29, 1996James River Corporation Of VirginiaImprinting felt and method of using the same
US5573637 *Dec 19, 1994Nov 12, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper product comprising a quaternary ammonium compound, a polysiloxane compound and binder materials
US5575891 *Jan 31, 1995Nov 19, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft tissue paper containing an oil and a polyhydroxy compound
US5580423 *Jun 1, 1995Dec 3, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5591305 *Mar 31, 1995Jan 7, 1997The James River Corporation Of VirginiaImprinting felt and method of using the same
US5607551 *Jun 24, 1993Mar 4, 1997Kimberly-Clark CorporationSoft tissue
US5611890 *Apr 7, 1995Mar 18, 1997The Proctor & Gamble CompanyTissue paper containing a fine particulate filler
US5616207 *Nov 21, 1994Apr 1, 1997Kimberly-Clark CorporationMethod for making uncreped throughdried towels and wipers
US5624532 *Feb 15, 1995Apr 29, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for enhancing the bulk softness of tissue paper and product therefrom
US5624676 *Aug 3, 1995Apr 29, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyLotioned tissue paper containing an emollient and a polyol polyester immobilizing agent
US5624790 *Dec 20, 1995Apr 29, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt and method of making the same using differential light transmission techniques
US5628876 *Feb 6, 1995May 13, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt having semicontinuous pattern and paper made thereon
US5635028 *Apr 19, 1995Jun 3, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making soft creped tissue paper and product therefrom
US5637194 *Dec 19, 1994Jun 10, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5653041 *Dec 20, 1994Aug 5, 1997Valmet CorporationDrying method and drying module as well as dryer sections that make use of same, in particular for a high-speed paper machine
US5656132 *Mar 6, 1995Aug 12, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft tissue
US5666744 *Nov 2, 1995Sep 16, 1997James River Corporation Of VirginiaInfrared paper drying machine and method for drying a paper web in an infrared paper drying machine
US5667636 *Oct 27, 1994Sep 16, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for making smooth uncreped throughdried sheets
US5672248 *Feb 6, 1995Sep 30, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of making soft tissue products
US5672249 *Apr 3, 1996Sep 30, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for including a fine particulate filler into tissue paper using starch
US5679222 *Jan 19, 1996Oct 21, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper having improved pinhole characteristics and papermaking belt for making the same
US5695486 *Sep 19, 1995Dec 9, 1997Buckeye Cellulose CorporationLight-weight, low density absorbent structure and method of making the structure
US5698074 *May 1, 1995Dec 16, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibers and pulps for papermaking based on chemical combination of poly (acrylate-co-itaconate), polyol and cellulosic fiber
US5698076 *Aug 21, 1996Dec 16, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper containing a vegetable oil based quaternary ammonium compound
US5700352 *Apr 3, 1996Dec 23, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for including a fine particulate filler into tissue paper using an anionic polyelectrolyte
US5705164 *Aug 3, 1995Jan 6, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyLotioned tissue paper containing a liquid polyol polyester emollient and an immobilizing agent
US5713397 *Aug 9, 1996Feb 3, 1998Wangner Systems CorporationMulti-layered through air drying fabric
US5714041 *May 22, 1995Feb 3, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt having semicontinuous pattern and paper made thereon
US5716692 *Feb 28, 1996Feb 10, 1998The Procter & Gamble Co.Lotioned tissue paper
US5718806 *Sep 3, 1996Feb 17, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyVacuum apparatus having flow management device for controlling the rate of application of vacuum pressure in a through air drying papermaking process
US5741402 *Sep 3, 1996Apr 21, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyVacuum apparatus having plurality of vacuum sections for controlling the rate of application of vacuum pressure in a through air drying papermaking process
US5743999 *Jun 15, 1994Apr 28, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for making soft tissue
US5744007 *Sep 3, 1996Apr 28, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyVacuum apparatus having textured web-facing surface for controlling the rate of application of vacuum pressure in a through air drying papermaking process
US5746887 *Apr 24, 1996May 5, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of making soft tissue products
US5759346 *Sep 27, 1996Jun 2, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making smooth uncreped tissue paper containing fine particulate fillers
US5772845 *Oct 17, 1996Jun 30, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft tissue
US5776307 *Jun 28, 1996Jul 7, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making wet pressed tissue paper with felts having selected permeabilities
US5776311 *Sep 3, 1996Jul 7, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyVacuum apparatus having transitional area for controlling the rate of application of vacuum in a through air drying papermaking process
US5795440 *Jun 28, 1996Aug 18, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making wet pressed tissue paper
US5804281 *Sep 23, 1996Sep 8, 1998The Proctor & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having at least three regions distinguished by intensive properties
US5806569 *Mar 26, 1997Sep 15, 1998Asten, Inc.Multiplanar single layer forming fabric
US5814188 *Dec 31, 1996Sep 29, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft tissue paper having a surface deposited substantive softening agent
US5830316 *May 16, 1997Nov 3, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of wet pressing tissue paper with three felt layers
US5830317 *Dec 20, 1996Nov 3, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft tissue paper with biased surface properties containing fine particulate fillers
US5832962 *Dec 29, 1995Nov 10, 1998Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.System for making absorbent paper products
US5834099 *Nov 15, 1996Nov 10, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable paper products with indicator means
US5839479 *Mar 26, 1997Nov 24, 1998Asten, Inc.Papermaking fabric for increasing bulk in the paper sheet
US5843279 *Aug 25, 1997Dec 1, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having at least three regions distinguished by intensive properties
US5846379 *Mar 1, 1995Dec 8, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5846380 *Apr 23, 1997Dec 8, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyCreped tissue paper exhibiting unique combination of physical attributes
US5851352 *May 12, 1997Dec 22, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft multi-ply tissue paper having a surface deposited strengthening agent
US5853547 *Oct 18, 1996Dec 29, 1998Asten, Inc.Papermaking fabric, process for producing high bulk products and the products produced thereby
US5855739 *Apr 22, 1997Jan 5, 1999The Procter & Gamble Co.Pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5861082 *Jun 5, 1995Jan 19, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5885417 *Mar 13, 1997Mar 23, 1999Fort James CorporationBiaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US5885421 *Sep 3, 1996Mar 23, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyVacuum apparatus for having textured clothing for controlling rate of application of vacuum pressure in a through air drying papermaking process
US5888347 *May 2, 1997Mar 30, 1999Kimberly-Clark World Wide, Inc.Method for making smooth uncreped throughdried sheets
US5897745 *Jun 6, 1997Apr 27, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of wet pressing tissue paper
US5902669 *Oct 28, 1997May 11, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable paper products with indicator means
US5904811 *Apr 21, 1997May 18, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyWet pressed paper web and method of making the same
US5925217 *Dec 29, 1995Jul 20, 1999Kimberly-Clark Tissue CompanySystem for making absorbent paper products
US5932068 *Mar 10, 1997Aug 3, 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft tissue
US5958185 *Nov 7, 1995Sep 28, 1999Vinson; Kenneth DouglasSoft filled tissue paper with biased surface properties
US5958187 *Jul 11, 1997Sep 28, 1999Fort James CorporationPrewettable high softness paper product having temporary wet strength
US5980691 *May 12, 1997Nov 9, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanySmooth through air dried tissue and process of making
US5981044 *Sep 12, 1996Nov 9, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-layered tissue paper web comprising biodegradable chemical softening compositions and binder materials and process for making the same
US6003241 *Apr 22, 1998Dec 21, 1999Valmet CorporationDrying unit and dryer section that makes use of such units
US6003245 *Apr 22, 1998Dec 21, 1999Valmet CorporationMethod for optimizing of evaporation drying of paper, runnability, and of paper quality as well as dryer section that makes use of the method in a paper machine
US6017417 *Oct 7, 1997Jan 25, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of making soft tissue products
US6039838 *Dec 29, 1995Mar 21, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.System for making absorbent paper products
US6039839 *Feb 3, 1998Mar 21, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making paper structures having a decorative pattern
US6051105 *Aug 3, 1998Apr 18, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of wet pressing tissue paper with three felt layers
US6059928 *Sep 18, 1995May 9, 2000Fort James CorporationPrewettable high softness paper product having temporary wet strength
US6101735 *Apr 22, 1998Aug 15, 2000Valmet CorporationDryer section in a paper machine in which impingement and/or ventilation hoods are used
US6103062 *Oct 1, 1998Aug 15, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of wet pressing tissue paper
US6117525 *Oct 8, 1998Sep 12, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-elevational tissue paper containing selectively disposed chemical papermaking additive
US6149768 *Apr 8, 1998Nov 21, 2000Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Recreped absorbent paper product and method for making
US6171442Apr 30, 1999Jan 9, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft tissue
US6180214Jan 14, 1999Jan 30, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyWiping article which exhibits differential wet extensibility characteristics
US6210528Dec 21, 1999Apr 3, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Process of making web-creped imprinted paper
US6265052Feb 9, 1999Jul 24, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper
US6270875Jan 14, 1999Aug 7, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyMultiple layer wipe
US6280573Aug 12, 1998Aug 28, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Leakage control system for treatment of moving webs
US6287426Sep 9, 1999Sep 11, 2001Valmet-Karlstad AbPaper machine for manufacturing structured soft paper
US6318727Nov 5, 1999Nov 20, 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Apparatus for maintaining a fluid seal with a moving substrate
US6340413Sep 19, 2000Jan 22, 2002Albany International AbEmbossing belt for a paper machine
US6344110Jun 19, 2000Feb 5, 2002Sca Hygiene Products AbMethod of producing a paper having a three-dimensional pattern
US6387217Nov 12, 1999May 14, 2002Fort James CorporationApparatus for maximizing water removal in a press nip
US6409714Dec 18, 2000Jun 25, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyThin comfortable interlabial absorbent structure
US6425983Mar 31, 2000Jul 30, 2002Fort James CorporationCreping blade, creped paper, and method of manufacturing paper
US6428794Sep 20, 1995Aug 6, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyLotion composition for treating tissue paper
US6432267Dec 8, 2000Aug 13, 2002Georgia-Pacific CorporationWet crepe, impingement-air dry process for making absorbent sheet
US6434856 *Aug 14, 2001Aug 20, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyVariable wet flow resistance drying apparatus, and process of drying a web therewith
US6447640Apr 18, 2001Sep 10, 2002Georgia-Pacific CorporationImpingement air dry process for making absorbent sheet
US6451166Feb 9, 2000Sep 17, 2002Fort James CorporationBiaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US6458248Mar 17, 2000Oct 1, 2002Fort James CorporationApparatus for maximizing water removal in a press nip
US6458447 *Apr 16, 1998Oct 1, 2002The Proctor & Gamble CompanyExtensible paper web and method of forming
US6458450Aug 11, 2000Oct 1, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper
US6517672Jul 16, 2001Feb 11, 2003Fort James CorporationMethod for maximizing water removal in a press nip
US6527913Oct 10, 2000Mar 4, 2003Fort James CorporationCreping blade, system, and method for creping a cellulosic web
US6540879Mar 19, 2002Apr 1, 2003Fort James CorporationCreping blade, creped paper, and method of manufacturing paper
US6547924Jul 27, 2001Apr 15, 2003Metso Paper Karlstad AbPaper machine for and method of manufacturing textured soft paper
US6547928Nov 30, 2001Apr 15, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft tissue paper having a softening composition containing an extensional viscosity modifier deposited thereon
US6551295Mar 13, 1998Apr 22, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent structures comprising fluid storage members with improved ability to dewater acquisition/distribution members
US6551453Dec 7, 1998Apr 22, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanySmooth, through air dried tissue and process of making
US6585861Dec 19, 2001Jul 1, 2003Metso Paper Karlstad AbDevice for producing an extensible paper having a three-dimensional pattern
US6613193Sep 9, 2002Sep 2, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for forming a nested rolled paper product
US6623834Jan 14, 1999Sep 23, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable wiping article with enhanced texture and method for manufacture
US6669821Nov 14, 2001Dec 30, 2003Fort James CorporationApparatus for maximizing water removal in a press nip
US6701637Apr 20, 2001Mar 9, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Systems for tissue dried with metal bands
US6709548Oct 30, 2002Mar 23, 2004Fort James CorporationCreping blade, creped paper, and method of manufacturing paper
US6713661Apr 23, 1999Mar 30, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent articles providing improved fit when wet
US6716514Sep 20, 2001Apr 6, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable article with enhanced texture
US6726809Sep 26, 2001Apr 27, 2004Albany International Corp.Industrial process fabric
US6733626Dec 21, 2001May 11, 2004Georgia Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US6746569Oct 31, 2000Jun 8, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Nested rolled paper product
US6752907Jan 9, 2002Jun 22, 2004Georgia-Pacific CorporationWet crepe throughdry process for making absorbent sheet and novel fibrous product
US6755937Apr 18, 2000Jun 29, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Paper sheet having improved rate of absorbency
US6797117Nov 30, 2000Sep 28, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyLow viscosity bilayer disrupted softening composition for tissue paper
US6808600Nov 8, 2002Oct 26, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for enhancing the softness of paper-based products
US6821386Feb 10, 2003Nov 23, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanySmooth, micropeak-containing through air dried tissue
US6827818Sep 27, 2002Dec 7, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft tissue
US6849157May 7, 2004Feb 1, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft tissue
US6855229Jan 16, 2004Feb 15, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyLow viscosity bilayer disrupted softening composition for tissue paper
US6877634Dec 31, 2002Apr 12, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.High capacity dispensing carton
US6887349Sep 5, 2002May 3, 2005Fort James CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US6918993May 28, 2003Jul 19, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Multi-ply wiping products made according to a low temperature delamination process
US6989075Nov 17, 2000Jan 24, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyTension activatable substrate
US6991706Sep 2, 2003Jan 31, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Clothlike pattern densified web
US6997342May 16, 2003Feb 14, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for sheet material
US6997345May 16, 2003Feb 14, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for sheet material
US7001486Dec 19, 2002Feb 21, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Vacuum device for paper web making apparatus
US7040502Dec 26, 2002May 9, 2006Kinberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for wet and dry interfolded sheets
US7041196Dec 18, 2003May 9, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US7045026Dec 18, 2003May 16, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US7112257Jan 7, 2004Sep 26, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of mechanical softening of sheet material
US7140513Dec 22, 2003Nov 28, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Convertible dispenser for sheet material
US7156954May 7, 2004Jan 2, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft tissue
US7160418Mar 23, 2004Jan 9, 2007Georgia-Pacific CorporationWet crepe throughdry process for making absorbent sheet and novel fibrous products
US7182838Mar 25, 2004Feb 27, 2007Georgia Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7186317 *Dec 12, 2003Mar 6, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for producing soft bulky tissue
US7189307Sep 2, 2003Mar 13, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Low odor binders curable at room temperature
US7207461May 16, 2003Apr 24, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for sheet material
US7229529Jul 15, 2004Jun 12, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Low odor binders curable at room temperature
US7265067Jun 19, 1998Sep 4, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for making structured paper
US7291249 *Dec 18, 2003Nov 6, 2007Voith Paper Patent GmbhApparatus for the manufacture of a structured fiber web
US7297226Feb 11, 2004Nov 20, 2007Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7297231Jul 15, 2004Nov 20, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Binders curable at room temperature with low blocking
US7300552Mar 3, 2003Nov 27, 2007Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpMethod for maximizing water removal in a press nip
US7311853Sep 20, 2002Dec 25, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper softening compositions containing quaternary ammonium compound and high levels of free amine and soft tissue paper products comprising said compositions
US7326322Nov 12, 2004Feb 5, 2008Georgia Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7332179Dec 12, 2003Feb 19, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Tissue products comprising a cleansing composition
US7351307 *Jan 30, 2004Apr 1, 2008Voith Paper Patent GmbhMethod of dewatering a fibrous web with a press belt
US7354502Dec 18, 2003Apr 8, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US7360560Jan 31, 2006Apr 22, 2008Astenjohnson, Inc.Single layer papermakers fabric
US7361253Jul 18, 2005Apr 22, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Multi-ply wiping products made according to a low temperature delamination process
US7374639Jun 8, 2005May 20, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt
US7404875Apr 28, 2004Jul 29, 2008Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpModified creping adhesive composition and method of use thereof
US7419569Nov 2, 2004Sep 2, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Paper manufacturing process
US7428978May 27, 2005Sep 30, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Sheet material dispenser
US7432309Oct 17, 2003Oct 7, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper softening compositions containing low levels of high molecular weight polymers and soft tissue paper products comprising said compositions
US7435312Nov 9, 2005Oct 14, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of making a clothlike pattern densified web
US7449085Nov 1, 2006Nov 11, 2008Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Paper sheet having high absorbent capacity and delayed wet-out
US7476293Oct 26, 2004Jan 13, 2009Voith Patent GmbhAdvanced dewatering system
US7476294Oct 26, 2004Jan 13, 2009Voith Patent GmbhPress section and permeable belt in a paper machine
US7485373Sep 11, 2003Feb 3, 2009Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Lotioned tissue product with improved stability
US7510631Jul 27, 2005Mar 31, 2009Voith Patent GmbhAdvanced dewatering system
US7524403Apr 28, 2006Apr 28, 2009Voith Paper Patent GmbhForming fabric and/or tissue molding belt and/or molding belt for use on an ATMOS system
US7527709Mar 14, 2006May 5, 2009Voith Paper Patent GmbhHigh tension permeable belt for an ATMOS system and press section of paper machine using the permeable belt
US7547443Sep 11, 2003Jun 16, 2009Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Skin care topical ointment
US7550061Apr 28, 2006Jun 23, 2009Voith Paper Patent GmbhDewatering tissue press fabric for an ATMOS system and press section of a paper machine using the dewatering fabric
US7566381Apr 16, 2007Jul 28, 2009Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Low odor binders curable at room temperature
US7582577Mar 23, 2006Sep 1, 2009The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structure comprising an oil system
US7591396May 24, 2006Sep 22, 2009Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Restrictor and dispensing system
US7642395Dec 28, 2004Jan 5, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Composition and wipe for reducing viscosity of viscoelastic bodily fluids
US7645359Jan 3, 2006Jan 12, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US7662260 *Aug 28, 2007Feb 16, 2010Voith Patent GmbhMethod for the manufacture of a fiber web provided with a three-dimensional surface structure
US7666448Jan 19, 2006Feb 23, 2010Sakura Properties, LlcSkin cleansing article
US7678228Sep 17, 2007Mar 16, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Binders curable at room temperature with low blocking
US7678230 *Dec 15, 2006Mar 16, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Environmentally sustainable multiple ply paper product
US7678856Sep 17, 2007Mar 16, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide Inc.Binders curable at room temperature with low blocking
US7686923 *Feb 7, 2008Mar 30, 2010Voith Patent GmbhPaper machine dewatering system
US7691228Oct 10, 2006Apr 6, 2010Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpWet crepe throughdry process for making absorbent sheet and novel fibrous products
US7691472May 18, 2006Apr 6, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyIndividualized seed hairs and products employing same
US7722902Jan 19, 2006May 25, 2010Sakura Properties, LlcSolid dosage form for providing a dietary supplement
US7744723May 2, 2007Jun 29, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structure product with high softness
US7744726Apr 13, 2007Jun 29, 2010Voith Patent GmbhTwin wire for an ATMOS system
US7749355Oct 25, 2005Jul 6, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyTissue paper
US7749545Mar 18, 2005Jul 6, 2010Sakura Properties, LlcFucoidan compositions and methods for dietary and nutritional supplements
US7754049Oct 18, 2007Jul 13, 2010Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpMethod for maximizing water removal in a press nip
US7758727Mar 5, 2007Jul 20, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for producing soft bulky tissue
US7776365Jan 19, 2006Aug 17, 2010Sakura Properties, LlcArticle with skin protecting and moisturizing compound
US7799176Oct 8, 2007Sep 21, 2010Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7806973May 21, 2007Oct 5, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyCompositions for imparting images on fibrous structures
US7807022Jul 15, 2008Oct 5, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Tissue sheets having good strength and bulk
US7811613May 18, 2006Oct 12, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyIndividualized trichomes and products employing same
US7811951Aug 19, 2009Oct 12, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structure comprising an oil system
US7820874Feb 10, 2006Oct 26, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyAcacia fiber-containing fibrous structures and methods for making same
US7829177Jun 8, 2005Nov 9, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb materials having offset emboss patterns disposed thereon
US7838004Jan 19, 2006Nov 23, 2010Sakura Properties, LlcMethod of making a partially hydrolyzed fucoidan composition
US7842166Apr 22, 2008Nov 30, 2010Voith Patent GmbhPress section and permeable belt in a paper machine
US7850820 *Aug 17, 2006Dec 14, 2010Voith Patent GmbhMethod for the production of tissue paper
US7857941Dec 18, 2006Dec 28, 2010Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7887673 *May 18, 2005Feb 15, 2011Metso Paper KarlstadPaper machine and method for manufacturing paper
US7914649Oct 26, 2007Mar 29, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt for making multi-elevation paper structures
US7918951Jan 3, 2006Apr 5, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US7922705 *Oct 3, 2005Apr 12, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyDensified fibrous structures and methods for making same
US7927457Oct 30, 2009Apr 19, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Environmentally sustainable multiple ply paper product
US7931781 *Jan 19, 2005Apr 26, 2011Voith Patent GmbhAdvanced dewatering system
US7951269Sep 28, 2007May 31, 2011Voith Patent GmbhAdvanced dewatering system
US7959761Apr 9, 2003Jun 14, 2011Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpCreping adhesive modifier and process for producing paper products
US8029645Jan 10, 2011Oct 4, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft and strong fibrous structures and methods for making same
US8049060Jun 29, 2006Nov 1, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyBulk softened fibrous structures
US8056841Aug 6, 2010Nov 15, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods for individualizing trichomes
US8075739Mar 10, 2009Dec 13, 2011Voith Patent GmbhAdvanced dewatering system
US8080130Jan 22, 2009Dec 20, 2011Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpHigh basis weight TAD towel prepared from coarse furnish
US8092652Mar 10, 2009Jan 10, 2012Voith Patent GmbhAdvanced dewatering system
US8118979Feb 28, 2011Feb 21, 2012Voith Patent GmbhAdvanced dewatering system
US8142617Aug 23, 2010Mar 27, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8163130Aug 19, 2010Apr 24, 2012The Proctor & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US8178025Dec 3, 2004May 15, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpEmbossing system and product made thereby with both perforate bosses in the cross machine direction and a macro pattern
US8211271Aug 19, 2010Jul 3, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US8231761Apr 20, 2011Jul 31, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpCreping adhesive modifier and process for producing paper products
US8282783May 3, 2010Oct 9, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt having a permeable reinforcing structure
US8287693May 3, 2010Oct 16, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyPapermaking belt having increased de-watering capability
US8287694Aug 17, 2010Oct 16, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8297543Oct 3, 2011Oct 30, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods for individualizing trichomes
US8298376Aug 19, 2010Oct 30, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyPatterned framework for a papermaking belt
US8303773Aug 11, 2011Nov 6, 2012Voith Patent GmbhMachine for the production of tissue paper
US8313617Aug 19, 2010Nov 20, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyPatterned framework for a papermaking belt
US8361278Sep 16, 2009Jan 29, 2013Dixie Consumer Products LlcFood wrap base sheet with regenerated cellulose microfiber
US8425722Aug 25, 2011Apr 23, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft and strong fibrous structures and methods for making same
US8455077May 7, 2007Jun 4, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structures comprising a region of auxiliary bonding and methods for making same
US8466216Apr 16, 2007Jun 18, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Low odor binders curable at room temperature
US8480852Nov 20, 2009Jul 9, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Cooling substrates with hydrophilic containment layer and method of making
US8512524Mar 27, 2012Aug 20, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyPatterned framework for a papermaking belt
US8535481Jun 13, 2012Sep 17, 2013Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8616126Mar 4, 2011Dec 31, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia having a large color gamut on web substrates
US8623176Sep 28, 2012Jan 7, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods for individualizing trichomes
US8642645Jan 30, 2012Feb 4, 2014Brooks Kelly Research, LLC.Pharmaceutical composition comprising Cannabinoids
US8647105Apr 16, 2012Feb 11, 2014Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpEmbossing system and product made thereby with both perforate bosses in the cross machine direction and a macro pattern
US8657997Dec 14, 2012Feb 25, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US8665493Mar 4, 2011Mar 4, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8668159Dec 19, 2007Mar 11, 2014Sca Hygiene Products AbFolded perforated web
US8758560Mar 4, 2011Jun 24, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8789289 *Jul 23, 2004Jul 29, 2014Voith Patent GmbhMethod and an apparatus for manufacturing a three-dimensional surface structure web
US8795717Nov 20, 2009Aug 5, 2014Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Tissue products including a temperature change composition containing phase change components within a non-interfering molecular scaffold
US8808501Jul 3, 2013Aug 19, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethods for individualizing trichomes
US8833250Mar 4, 2011Sep 16, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia having a large color gamut on web substrates
US8839716Mar 4, 2011Sep 23, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia having a large color gamut on web substrates
US8839717Mar 4, 2011Sep 23, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyUnique process for printing multiple color indicia upon web substrates
US8894814Jul 3, 2013Nov 25, 2014Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Cooling substrates with hydrophilic containment layer and method of making
US8900409Jan 15, 2014Dec 2, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US8916260Mar 4, 2011Dec 23, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8916261Mar 4, 2011Dec 23, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8920911Mar 4, 2011Dec 30, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8927092Mar 4, 2011Jan 6, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8927093Mar 4, 2011Jan 6, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8943957Mar 4, 2011Feb 3, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia having a large color gamut on web substrates
US8943958Mar 4, 2011Feb 3, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia having a large color gamut on web substrates
US8943959Mar 4, 2011Feb 3, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyUnique process for printing multiple color indicia upon web substrates
US8943960Mar 4, 2011Feb 3, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyUnique process for printing multiple color indicia upon web substrates
US8962124Mar 4, 2011Feb 24, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyWeb substrates having wide color gamut indicia printed thereon
US8974635Mar 4, 2014Mar 10, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US8985013Mar 4, 2011Mar 24, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia having a large color gamut on web substrates
US9017516Oct 28, 2014Apr 28, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US9032875Aug 27, 2014May 19, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia on web substrates
US9034144Jan 28, 2015May 19, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US9062414Mar 26, 2013Jun 23, 2015Astenjohnson, Inc.Single layer papermaking fabrics for manufacture of tissue and similar products
US9085130Sep 27, 2013Jul 21, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyOptimized internally-fed high-speed rotary printing device
US9102133Aug 27, 2014Aug 11, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia on web substrates
US9102182Aug 25, 2014Aug 11, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia on web substrates
US9103072Feb 6, 2015Aug 11, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper product having unique physical properties
US9108398Aug 27, 2014Aug 18, 2015The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for applying indicia on web substrates
US20020148584 *Jan 9, 2002Oct 17, 2002Edwards Steven L.Wet crepe throughdry process for making absorbent sheet and novel fibrous products
US20040082668 *Oct 17, 2003Apr 29, 2004Vinson Kenneth DouglasPaper softening compositions containing low levels of high molecular weight polymers and soft tissue paper products comprising said compositions
US20040089429 *Nov 8, 2002May 13, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for enhancing the softness of paper-based products
US20040118543 *Dec 19, 2002Jun 24, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Vacuum device for paper web making apparatus
US20040124202 *Dec 26, 2002Jul 1, 2004Joseph MitchellDispenser for wet and/or dry products
US20040124203 *Dec 26, 2002Jul 1, 2004Phelps Stephen L.Dispenser for wet and dry interfolded sheets
US20040124207 *Dec 31, 2002Jul 1, 2004Tramontina Paul FrancisHigh capacity dispensing carton
US20040144511 *Jan 16, 2004Jul 29, 2004Mckay David D.Low viscosity bilayer disrupted softening composition for tissue paper
US20040154763 *Dec 18, 2003Aug 12, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US20040154769 *Dec 18, 2003Aug 12, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US20040157515 *Dec 18, 2003Aug 12, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess for making a fibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US20040157524 *Dec 18, 2003Aug 12, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structure comprising cellulosic and synthetic fibers
US20040180178 *Mar 25, 2004Sep 16, 2004Georgia Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US20040188045 *Jan 28, 2004Sep 30, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyLow viscosity bilayer disrupted softening composition for tissue paper
US20040206465 *May 7, 2004Oct 21, 2004Farrington Theodore EdwinSoft tissue
US20040209058 *Oct 2, 2003Oct 21, 2004Chou Hung LiangPaper products including surface treated thermally bondable fibers and methods of making the same
US20040226673 *Mar 23, 2004Nov 18, 2004Edwards Steven L.Wet crepe throughdry process for making absorbent sheet and novel fibrous products
US20040229067 *Jan 7, 2004Nov 18, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method of mechanical softening of sheet material
US20040237210 *Dec 18, 2003Dec 2, 2004Thomas Thoroe-ScherbMethod and an apparatus for the manufacture of a fiber web provided with a three-dimensional surface structure
US20040245266 *May 16, 2003Dec 9, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for sheet material
US20040245267 *May 16, 2003Dec 9, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for sheet material
US20040251590 *May 16, 2003Dec 16, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for sheet material
US20040258886 *Jun 23, 2004Dec 23, 2004The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent tissue-towel products comprising related embossed and printed indicia
US20050006039 *May 7, 2004Jan 13, 2005Farrington Theodore EdwinSoft tissue
US20050006040 *Apr 9, 2003Jan 13, 2005Boettcher Jeffery J.Creping adhesive modifier and process for producing paper products
US20050045292 *Sep 2, 2003Mar 3, 2005Lindsay Jeffrey DeanClothlike pattern densified web
US20050045293 *Sep 2, 2003Mar 3, 2005Hermans Michael AlanPaper sheet having high absorbent capacity and delayed wet-out
US20050045294 *Sep 2, 2003Mar 3, 2005Goulet Mike ThomasLow odor binders curable at room temperature
US20050045295 *Jul 15, 2004Mar 3, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Low odor binders curable at room temperature
US20050058669 *Sep 11, 2003Mar 17, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Skin care topical ointment
US20050058674 *Sep 11, 2003Mar 17, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Moisturizing and lubricating compositions
US20050058693 *Sep 11, 2003Mar 17, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Tissue products comprising a moisturizing and lubricating composition
US20050058833 *Sep 11, 2003Mar 17, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Lotioned tissue product with improved stability
US20050059941 *Sep 11, 2003Mar 17, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Absorbent product with improved liner treatment
US20050092195 *Nov 12, 2004May 5, 2005Fort James CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US20050101927 *Sep 11, 2003May 12, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Absorbent products comprising a moisturizing and lubricating composition
US20050109871 *Nov 24, 2003May 26, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Roll mount dispenser
US20050126031 *Jul 23, 2004Jun 16, 2005Jeffrey HermanMethod and an apparatus for manufacturing a three-dimensional surface structure web
US20050126728 *Dec 12, 2003Jun 16, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for producing soft bulky tissue
US20050129741 *Dec 12, 2003Jun 16, 2005Annastacia KistlerTissue products comprising a cleansing composition
US20050136097 *Dec 19, 2003Jun 23, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Soft paper-based products
US20050167061 *Jan 30, 2004Aug 4, 2005Scherb Thomas T.Paper machine dewatering system
US20050178781 *Dec 22, 2003Aug 18, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Convertible dispenser for sheet material
US20050244480 *Apr 30, 2004Nov 3, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Pre-wipes for improving anal cleansing
US20050245669 *Apr 28, 2004Nov 3, 2005Nancy ClungeonModified creping adhesive composition and method of use thereof
US20050247417 *Jul 18, 2005Nov 10, 2005Maurizio TirimaccoMulti-ply wiping products made according to a low temperature delamination process
US20060014884 *Jul 15, 2004Jan 19, 2006Kimberty-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Binders curable at room temperature with low blocking
USRE42968 *Mar 15, 2011Nov 29, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structure product with high softness
CN103266528B *May 13, 2013May 6, 2015金红叶纸业集团有限公司造纸设备及造纸方法
DE2553812A1 *Nov 29, 1975Jun 10, 1976Buckeye Cellulose CorpGeraeuschloser kraeftiger, tuchartiger schichtstoff
DE2615889A1 *Apr 10, 1976Oct 20, 1977Schickedanz Ver PapierwerkSoft absorbent tissue paper prodn. - by adding thermoplastic fibres to cellulose slurry, thermally drying and surface embossing
DE3008344A1 *Mar 5, 1980Sep 18, 1980Procter & GamblePapiermaschinen-tuch
EP0033559A2 *Jan 19, 1981Aug 12, 1981THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYA method of and an apparatus for making imprinted paper
EP0033988A2 *Jan 26, 1981Aug 19, 1981THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYMethod of making a pattern densified fibrous web having spaced, binder impregnated high density zones
EP0097036A2 *Jun 9, 1983Dec 28, 1983THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYStrong absorbent industrial wiper
EP0109307A2 *Nov 15, 1983May 23, 1984Scott Paper CompanyPapermaking machine
EP0140404A1 *Aug 16, 1984May 8, 1985THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYTissue paper and process of manufacture thereof
EP0220904A2Oct 20, 1986May 6, 1987THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYArticle with laminated paper orientation for improved fabric softening
EP0426288A2 *Sep 11, 1990May 8, 1991James River Corporation Of VirginiaMethod for producing a high bulk paper web and product obtained thereby
EP0771904A2Oct 31, 1996May 7, 1997James River Corporation Of VirginiaInfrared paper drying machine and method for drying a paper web in an infrared paper drying machine
EP0782644A1Aug 4, 1995Jul 9, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Wet-resilient webs
EP0788570A1 *Sep 1, 1995Aug 13, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for making smooth uncreped throughdried sheets
EP0839955A2 *Sep 11, 1990May 6, 1998Fort James CorporationHigh bulk paper web
EP0956804A1May 13, 1998Nov 17, 1999THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYPaper tissue roll
EP1405949A2 *Oct 2, 2003Apr 7, 2004Fort James CorporationPaper products including surface treated thermally bondable fibers and methods of making the same
EP1632604A1Sep 1, 2005Mar 8, 2006Fort James CorporationMulti-ply paper product and method of making the same
EP2088237A1Jan 26, 2009Aug 12, 2009Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LPHigh basis weight TAD towel prepared from coarse furnish
EP2463425A1Dec 8, 2011Jun 13, 2012Buckeye Technologies Inc.Dispersible nonwoven wipe material
EP2656862A1Apr 24, 2012Oct 30, 2013The Procter and Gamble CompanySubstrate comprising one or more human milk oligosaccharides and disposable absorbent article comprising the substrate
WO1997024490A1 *Dec 20, 1996Jul 10, 1997Kimberly Clark Tissue CoAbsorbent paper products
WO1998059110A1 *Jun 18, 1998Dec 30, 1998Procter & GamblePaper having peninsular segments and papermaking clothing therefor
WO2000037740A1 *Dec 21, 1999Jun 29, 2000Kimberly Clark CoWet-creped, imprinted paper web
WO2002040260A2 *Oct 29, 2001May 23, 2002Kimberly Clark CoMethod and apparatus for forming a rolled paper product
WO2002043546A1Nov 27, 2001Jun 6, 2002Procter & GambleDispensing apparatus
WO2004093628A1Jan 30, 2004Nov 4, 2004Kimberly Clark CoContainer and cartridge for dispensing paper products
WO2004103139A1Feb 20, 2004Dec 2, 2004Andres Melanie LA dispenser for sheet material
WO2004103140A1Feb 25, 2004Dec 2, 2004Andres Melanie LA dispenser for sheet material
WO2004103833A1Feb 25, 2004Dec 2, 2004Melanie L AndresA dispenser for sheet material
WO2005067776A1Aug 30, 2004Jul 28, 2005Kimberly Clark CoA convertible dispenser for sheet material
WO2006132696A1Mar 31, 2006Dec 14, 2006Kimberly Clark CoContainer and cartridge for dispensing paper products
WO2008054741A2 *Oct 30, 2007May 8, 2008Procter & GambleProcess of making wet-microcontracted paper
WO2010004519A2Jul 9, 2009Jan 14, 2010Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Substrates having formulations with improved transferability
WO2011087975A1Jan 10, 2011Jul 21, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanySoft and strong fibrous structures and methods for making same
WO2011106584A1Feb 25, 2011Sep 1, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structure product with high wet bulk recovery
WO2011139950A2May 2, 2011Nov 10, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyA papermaking belt having a permeable reinforcing structure
WO2011139999A1May 3, 2011Nov 10, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyA papermaking belt having increased de-watering capability
WO2012024077A1Aug 2, 2011Feb 23, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyA papermaking belt with a knuckle area forming a geometric pattern that is repeated at ever smaller scales to produce irregular shapes and surfaces
WO2012024459A1Aug 18, 2011Feb 23, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyA papermaking belt with a knuckle area forming a geometric pattern that is repeated at ever smaller scales to produce irregular shapes and surfaces
WO2012024460A1Aug 18, 2011Feb 23, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyA paper product having unique physical properties
WO2012024463A2Aug 18, 2011Feb 23, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyA paper product having unique physical properties
WO2012078860A1Dec 8, 2011Jun 14, 2012Buckeye Technologies Inc.Dispersible nonwoven wipe material
WO2013109659A1Jan 17, 2013Jul 25, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyHardwood pulp fiber-containing fibrous structures and methods for making same
WO2013126531A1Feb 21, 2013Aug 29, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyEmbossed fibrous structures and methods for making same
WO2013163075A1Apr 22, 2013Oct 31, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanySubstrate comprising one or more human milk oligosaccharides and disposable absorbent article comprising the substrate
WO2013181302A1May 30, 2013Dec 5, 2013The Procter & Gamble CompanyFibrous structures and methods for making same
WO2014004939A1Jun 28, 2013Jan 3, 2014The Procter & Gamble CompanyTextured fibrous webs, apparatus and methods for forming textured fibrous webs
WO2015088881A1Dec 5, 2014Jun 18, 2015Buckman Laboratories International, Inc.Adhesive formulation and creping methods using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification162/113, 162/117, 162/116, 139/425.00A, 162/362, 162/305, 139/425.00R, 162/206
International ClassificationA47K10/16, B29D7/01, D03D1/00, D21F11/00, D21F11/14, D04H1/74, D21H27/00
Cooperative ClassificationD21F11/006, D21H25/005, D21H5/24
European ClassificationD21H25/00B, D21H5/24, D21F11/00E