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Publication numberUS3302214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 7, 1967
Filing dateJun 1, 1964
Priority dateJun 1, 1964
Publication numberUS 3302214 A, US 3302214A, US-A-3302214, US3302214 A, US3302214A
InventorsYuritch Victor Lester
Original AssigneeYuritch Victor Lester
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective armor for the human body
US 3302214 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 7, 1967 v. 1.. YURITCH 3,302,214

- PROTECTIVE ARMOR FOR THE HUMAN BODY Filed June 1, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

ATTUENEK Feb. 7, 1967 v. L. YURITCH 3,302,214

PROTECTIVE ARMOR FOR THE HUMAN BODY Filed June 1, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet z INVENTOR.

United States Patent 3,302,214 PROTECTIVE ARMOR FOR THE HUMAN BODY Victor Lester Yuritch, 11 Morris St., Merchantville, NJ. 08109 Filed June 1, 1964, Ser. No. 371,673 4 Claims. (Cl. 2--2.5)

This invention relates to protective armor for the human body, and particularly to armor which can be releasably applied to the human body in the region of the chest and head to protect the body against blows while engaged in such sports as boxing, automobile sports racing, etc.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a novel protective armor or guard which will enable persons to engage in the sport of boxing without causing injury or disfigurement to each other, even when they strike each other with blows of relatively great force.

More particularly, it is an object of the invention to provide an improved protective armor to be used by boxers and which, while protecting the wearers from injury or disfigurement, nevertheless affords the wearer complete freedom of vision and motion such as required in boxing.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved protective armor as aforesaid which will enable boxers wearing the same to engage in boxing or the like competitively and which will enable a record of the effectiveness of each participant to be built up and recorded, thereby making it possible to readily ascertain which participant attains the highest score.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an improved protective armor which will protect its users from the shock of physical impact to the head, neck and chest by blows from an opponent, as in boxing, or from other impacts, as in the case of an accident occurring during an automobile sports car race or the like.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide an improved armor as aforesaid which i useful in training boxers, and especially youngsters, in the art of self-defense while affording them protection against being hurt and thereby helping to instill confidence in them.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved protective armor as above set forth which is inexpensive in cost, simple in construction, and highly effective in use.

In accordance with one form of the invention, the protective armor may be molded or otherwise formed of rigid, plastic material to provide integral chest plate and head mask portions, the chest plate having suitably shaped, integral shoulder engaging members, and the head mask extending from the chest plate between the shoulderengaging members. Flexible straps affixed to the lower end of the chest plate and to the shoulder-engaging members are crossed at the back of the wearer and can be adjusted to cause the armor to fit snugly against his chest and shoulders. The head mask is contoured to extend across the wearers face and along the sides of the wearers head back beyond the ears, and it is dimensioned to provide a loose fit around the head. The head mask includes a chin receiving portion above which are a pair of transverse, vertically spaced slots, the lower one at about the level of the mouth to facilitate breathing and talking, and the upper one at the level of the eyes to permit clear vision therethrough. Above the upper slot, the mask has a forehead-engaging portion, the mask being open at the rear and at the top. Thus, the wearer can pull his head rearwardly or move it upwardly at will to raise hi eyes above the forehead-engaging portion for unobstructed vision and to enable the user to cool off readily, as between rounds of a boxing contest. The inside of at least the head mask, but preferably also the inner surface of the chest plate and its shoulder-engaging members, may

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be lined with padding material such as sponge rubber, isocyanate foam, or the like, to absorb some of the forces of blows and to protect the faces of users from rubbing against the hard, inside surface of the mask. If desired, a hollow, air-filled, rubber or plastic sheathing, or one of sponge rubber, can be applied to the outer surface of the mask. Such a sheathing would give or yield somewhat in response to blows in the region of the head, just as human flesh does, thus providing a more realistic or natural effect.

Mounted on the armor at a suitable location is a normally open microswitch of the inertia type operable to close when a blow of a force in excess of a predetermined force is applied against the armor at any portion thereof.

This switch is connected in series with a power source, such as a small battery, a stepping relay, and a counter which is actuable by the relay each time the microswitch is closed. The battery, the relay and the counter may be attached to one of the straps and thus carried on the back of the wearer, and the counter will indicate the number of effective blows (i.e., those in excess of the aforementioned predetermined force) which are struck by an opponent. In this way, a record of the points scored by each contestent will be recorded and indicated by the counter on his opponents armor. If desired, one or more lights, buzzers, or the like, can also be connected to indicate foul blows. Furthermore, two or more microswitches of different degrees of sensitivity can be mounted on the armor and respectively connected to lights of different colors on the straps to indicate blows of different intensities, and even knock-out blows. Thus, it will be apparent that the novel armor of this invention not only affords protection against injury to the chest and head of the wearer, but that it also affords means of readily making boxing a competitive game or sport, so to speak, by recording and/ or indicating the results attained by each participant.

The novel features of the invention, both as to its organization and its method of use and operation, as well as additionalobjects and advantages thereof, will be more readily apparent from the following description, when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevation of one form of protective armor according to the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a front perspective view thereof and showing the armor of FIGURE 1 applied to a wearer;

FIGURE 3 is a rear perspective view thereof, also applied to a wearer and showing the manner of attaching the armor to the wearer; and

FIGURE 4 is a top plan view thereof, again showing the armor applied to a wearer.

Referring to the drawings in greater detail, there is shown an armor comprising a somewhat Y-shaped chest plate 1 having a pair of curved shoulder-engaging members 3 and a head mask 5. The chest plate, the shoulderengaging members and the head mask are preferably formed as an integral unit, as by molding from suitable material, such as one of the polymethacrylate resins known commercially as Lucite or Plexiglas, or from other synthetic materials, such as nylon, Bakelite, or the like, or from fiberglass and a suitable binder, etc. In any case, the finished armor should be hard and rigid enough to withstand blows thereagainst of substantial force such as might be delivered by a boxer in the course of boxing and afford to the wearer protection from injury by such blows.

When the shoulder-engaging members 3 are placed on the shoulders, the chest plate 1 fits against the chest. The mask 5 is contoured to fit across the face and around the sides of the head to points beyond the ears. The

. mask 5 extends from the chest plate 1 between the shoulder-engaging members 3 and has a chin receiving portion 7 and a pair of vertically spaced, transversely extending slots or openings 9 and 11 therethrough. The mask terminates in a forehead-engaging portion 13 at its upper end above the upper opening 11, but is completely open at the rear and at the top. Preferably, the mask 5 is lined with a padding 15 of sponge rubber, isocyanate foam, or the like, to protect the face of the wearer from rubbing against the hard, interior surface of the mask, and also to absorb some of the forces of blows applied against the mask. If desired, the inner surfaces of the chest plate 1 and the shoulder-engaging members 3 may be lined similarly.

The upper slot 11 and the head mask 5 is preferably longer and wider than the lower slot 9. When the mask is in place around the face, the chin of the wearer can be disposed in the chin receiving portion 7 and the forehead placed against the forehead-engaging portion 13. The wearers mouth is then in substantial alignment with the lower slot 9 to facilitate breathing and talking, and the eyes are in substantial alignment with the upper slot 11 to provide clear vision over a substantial angle from side to side, as well as up and down. However, at various times, as during periods of rest, the head can be pulled rearwardly away from the front of the mask to permit cooling of the head, or the wearer can raise his head upwardly to bring his eyes up above the foreheadengaging portion 13 and thus provide complete freedom of unobstructed vision, as well as enabling the head to cool. These motions are possible because the mask 5 is open at the rear and at the top.

Secured respectively to the chest plate 1 adjacent the lower corners thereof and to the shoulder-engaging members 3, as by rivets 17, are two pairs of cooperating, flexible straps 19a and 19b of webbing or the like. The straps 19b carry buckles 21 through which the straps 19a can be drawn or threaded in customary manner, the straps being crossed behind the users back and pulled tight, as shown in FIGURE 3. Thus, the chest plate 1 and shoulder-engaging members 3 can be made to fit snugly against the chest and shoulders of the wearer, while the mask 5 fits loosely around the face and sides of the head to permit freedom of movement of the head.

Mounted on the chin receiving portion 7 is a normally open microswitch 23 of the inertia type, the switch being designed to close momentarily only in response to a blow of an intensity above a predetermined, minimum force applied to the armor at any point thereon. Mounted on one of the straps 191) so as to be carried on the wearers back are a source of power, such as a battery 25, which is connected in series with the switch 23 and also to the winding of a stepping relay 27 which cooperates with a counter 29 in known manner. Each time a blow of a force in excess of the predetermined minimum force is applied against the armor, the switch 23 is closed momentarily, and a pulse of current is applied to the coil of the relay to actuate it, and the relay, in turn, advances the counter register one unit. If desired, a master control switch 31 can also be mounted on the same strap 1% and connected to the relay 27 to render the relay either active or inactive, as may be desired.

From the foregoing description, it will be apparent that there has been provided a novel protective armor which can not only protect the human body from injury that might result from blows inflicted in the region of the chest, shoulders, neck and head, but which will provide a record of the effectiveness of each combatant when worn by boxers. Although the invention has been described primarily in connection with the sport of boxing, where it is especially useful in training boxers, it will be appreciated that it is also useful in other sports Where the human body is apt to be subject to physical blows and possible injury, as in sports car racing. Furthermore, while only a single embodiment of the invention has been described, it will be apparent that other forms thereof, as well as variations in the one described, all coming within the spirit of this invention, are possible. For example, the chest plate may be made longer than shown so as to extend down over more or less of the stomach and even below the stomach, the armor then being useful to baseball catchers, hockey players, and others. If desired, the sides of the head mask may be provided with openings in the regions of the ears to facilitate hearing as well as cooling of the ears and sides of the face. A hollow sheath, as described above, may also be incorporated on the outside surface of the head mask to cushion blows and to provide a more natural effect simulating that when human flesh is encountered. Also, where deemed desirable, one or more lights of different colors, a bell, a buzzer or the like, can be mounted on the back straps in circuit with one or more of the microswitches to be energized each time a blow causes one or another of such switches to be closed, thereby lending interest to the sport, especially on the part of observers, score keepers, or the like. Also, the various circuit components or elements can be mounted elsewhere than as shown or described, and a foul buzzer, for example, might be installed in a separate belt or strap at the waist line to provide a warning signal when a low blow is struck. Other variations and modifications will, no doubt, readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the art. It is therefore desired that the foregoing shall be taken as illustrated only, and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. A proctective armor for the human body comprising a chest plate having shoulder-engaging members adapted to rest on the shoulders of a wearer and thus support said chest plate against the wearers chest, and a head mask extending from said chest plate between said shoulderengaging members, said mask being contoured to embrace the front of the wearers face and to extend around the sides of the head to points behind the ears, and said head mask including a chin receiving portion and also having a pair of transverse openings therein, one of said openings being located just above said chin receiving portion for substantial alignment with the wearers mouth, and the other of said openings being located above said one opening for substantial alignment with the wearers eyes when the wearers chin is disposed in said chin receiving portion and substantially resting thereon, said head mas also including a forehead-engaging portion above said other opening, said head mask being open at the rear and at the top and being devoid of any means of connection thereof to the head of the wearer whereby the wearer is free to withdraw his chin from said chin receiving portion in either a rearward direction away from the front of said mask, or in an upward direction to raise the eyes above said forehead engaging portion for complete freedom of unobstructed view.

2. A protective armor according to claim 1 which is sufiiciently rigid to withstand blows of substantial force thereagainst, and characterized by the addition of means in association with said armor for registering said blows.

3. A protective armor according to claim 2 wherein said registering means comprises a microswitch mounted on said armor and actuable by blows against said armor of forces in excess of a predetermined force, and means response to actuation of said microswitch for registering said blows.

4. A protective armor for the humtn body comprising a chest plate having shoulder-engaging members adapted to rest on the shoulders of a wearer and thus support said chest plate against the wearers chest, and a head mask extending from said chest plate between said shoulderengaging members, said mask being contoured to embrace the front of the wearers face and to extend around the sides of the head to points behind the ears, said head mask including a chin receiving portion and also having a pair of transverse openings therein, one of said openings being located just above said chin receiving portion for substantial alignment with the wearers mouth, and the other of said openings being located above said one opening for substantial alignment with the wearers eyes when the wearers chin is disposed in said chin receiving portion and substantially resting thereon, strap means secured to said shoulder-engaging members and to the lower end of said chest plate, said strap means being adapted to be releasably applied to the wearers back in crossed relation to secure said armor in place on the wearer, said armor being sufficiently rigid to withstand blows of substantial force thereagainst, means for indicating said blows, said indicating means comprising an inertia type, normally open micro-switch mounted on said armor and periodically actuated to closed position by the force of each of successive blows against said armor in excess of means responsive to closing of said switch for providing an indication of said blows.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,333,438 3/1920 Moore 22.5 1,350,062 8/1920 Brewster 2-2.5 2,592,429 4/1952 Kimmel et al. 273102.2 2,743,929 5/1956 Smith 273102.2 X 2,916,287 12/1959 Davey 273-1 3,128,097 4/1964 La Rocca 2731 JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

a predetermined force, and means carried by said strap 15 J. R. BOLER, Examiner-

Patent Citations
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US1333438 *Nov 29, 1918Mar 9, 1920 Body protector or armor
US1350062 *Dec 28, 1915Aug 17, 1920Emil HellerBullet-proof armor
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3707004 *Feb 2, 1971Dec 26, 1972Christine S KapitanBallistic resistant protective guard
US3795396 *Jun 23, 1972Mar 5, 1974E KropelnitskiJump measuring device
US3841630 *Jan 14, 1974Oct 15, 1974Raymond Lee Organization IncHockey player training device
US3866909 *Apr 9, 1973Feb 18, 1975Militana Salvatore GProtective garment for karate with force indicating members thereon
US4286170 *Feb 11, 1980Aug 25, 1981Samuel MotiX-Ray face mask and chest shield device
US4432545 *Apr 30, 1982Feb 21, 1984Vanderpool Charles CNon-lethal cock fighting system
US4746118 *Jun 30, 1986May 24, 1988Dennis DeveneyBatting aid
US4761005 *Oct 10, 1985Aug 2, 1988Barry J. FrenchSports scoring device including a flexible prezoelectric layer resilient layer
US4763275 *Feb 20, 1986Aug 9, 1988Carlin John AForce accumulating device for sporting protective gear
US4824107 *Sep 8, 1986Apr 25, 1989French Barry JSports scoring device including a piezoelectric transducer
US6098196 *Sep 24, 1998Aug 8, 2000Logan; MichaelBody armor
US6308578Nov 17, 1999Oct 30, 2001Derose DayneForge protection device and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/2.5, 273/374, 273/455, 273/DIG.170
International ClassificationA41D13/015, A41D13/05, A63B71/08
Cooperative ClassificationA41D13/0512, A41D13/0153, Y10S273/17, A63B71/08
European ClassificationA41D13/015H, A41D13/05C, A63B71/08