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Publication numberUS3303602 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1967
Filing dateMay 28, 1964
Priority dateMay 28, 1964
Publication numberUS 3303602 A, US 3303602A, US-A-3303602, US3303602 A, US3303602A
InventorsCarley Douglas Livingston
Original AssigneeColgate Palmolive Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container convertible to a toy
US 3303602 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1967 L. c. DOUGLAS 3,303,602

CONTAINER CONVERTIBLE To A TOY Filed My 28, 1964 2 Sheets-sheet 1 INVENTOR z'vzyso/z moufles ATTORNEY tm Iaajlas ATTORNEY Feb. 14, 1967 c. DOUGLAS CONTAINER CONVERTIBLE TO A TOY Filed May 28, 1964 United States Patent 3,303,602 CONTAINER CNVERTIBLE T0 A TOY Livingston Carley Douglas, Leonia, NJ., assgnor to Colgate-Palmolive Company, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 28, 1964, Ser. No. 370,791 4 Claims. (Cl. 46-11) The present invention relates to a novel container for household commodities. More particularly, the present invention relates to a novel container which may be readily utilized as a childs toy both when the container is lled with a sales commodity and also after the container has `been emptied.

The containers of the present invention are shaped to simulate boats and are adapted to contain a commodity such as liquid soap or the like. Propulsion means are provided to propel the boat through water. When the container is filled with a commodity, the container will float in Iwater in a partially submerged position and then resemble a one-man torpedo. When empty, the container will oat on top of the water. In view of the above, the container may be considered to be two toys in one. In each case the propulsion means will be effective to propel the toy.

It is well recognized that sales of household commodities enjoy greater sales volume when some inducement foiconsumer acceptance in addition to the packaged commodity is provided. Since the retailing of such commodities is highly competitive, sales stimulants that will result in the preferential selection of one brand instead of another of similar quality are highly prized in industry. Containers produced in accordance with the present in vention are useful as such sales stimulants.

Accordingly, one of the primary objects of the present invention is to provide a container which may be readily utilized as a propelled toy even by a small child.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel container for household commodities which is useful as a sales stimulant for such commodities.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide auxiliary parts which may be removably secured to a container so that the container is utilizable as a toy.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel, inexpensive toy boat having members integral with the hull of the boat which are adapted to position and support propulsion means for the boat.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a view in side elevation with par-ts broken away and in section of one embodiment of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a bottom plan view of the FIGURE l embodiment;

FIGURE 3 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on line 3 3 of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 4 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on line 4 4 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 6 is a side elevational View of another ernbodiment of the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIGURE 1, there is illustrated a bottle-like receptacle shaped to simulate a speedboat having a hull generally designated by reference numeral 10. The hull has a prow 12, a stern 14, and Ia deck 16 which extends from the prow rearwardly to a cockpit 18 in which there is seated a driver 2t). A tail fin 22 is located behind the cockpit.

The receptacle is lled and emptied through an opening having a threaded neck 24 which projects rearwardly of stern 14. A cap 26 is screwed onto neck 24 in the conventional manner. To insure a tight t, the neck may be provided with an annular flange 28 which is adapted to be wedged outwardly by an annular rim 30 of cap 26. As illustrated, neck 24 and the associated cap 26 `are so positioned at the stern so` as stimulate an integral part of the speedboat such as a nozzle or an exhaust duct.

As shown in FIGURE 2, the bottom of hull 10 isprovided with a longitudinal channel 32 which extends over a major portion of the length of the hull. Adjacent its forward end, channel 32 is closed off by a pair vof cooperating projections 34 which are integral with the hull. Projections 34 which are connected by an arcuate bridging member 36 (FIGURE 3) cooperate to define a longitudinal slot which is substantially keyhole shaped when viewed in transverse cross-section. The slot includes a neck 38 which constitutes the entrance to the slot. Proe jections 34 have a limitedamounting of resiliency and can be deformed so that a shaftV 40 may be inserte-d through neck '38 and retained within the slot. For this purpose, the width of neck 38 is slightly smaller than the diameter of shaft 40. A pair of `bolts 42 or similar retaining means iabut the front and rear surfaces of projections 34 to restrain rotation of shaft 40 within the slot. The rear end of shaft 48 is formed into a ho-ok 44 for a purpose Iwhich will become more apparent hereinafter.

Adjacent the stern, the hull includes a pair of integral, cooperating projections 46 which close off the other end `of channel 32. Projections 46 are connected at the upper ends by an arcuate bridging member 48 and cooperate to define Aan essentially keyhole shaped longitudinal slot having a reduced diameter neck 50 (FIGURE 5). A drive shaft 52 which has a diameter slightly larger than the width of neck Sli is adapted to be forced through neck 50 and rotatably retained within the slot between projections 46. Longitudinal movement of drive shaft 52 is restrained by a pair of enlargements having arcuate bearing surfaces 54. The stern end of shaft 52 is received within a bore provided in a hub 56 of propeller 58. At its other end, shaft 40 is provided with a hook'60. A rubber band 62 or similar elastic means is connected between the forward hook 44 and hook 60 of drive shaft v52. It will be appreciated that the rubber band 62 may be twisted by manually rotating propeller 58 to store energy for subsequently propelling the boat. Due to the position of rubber band 62 and its associated structure at the bottom `of the hull, this assembly also functionsv as a keel to further stabilize the boat.

A preferred embodiment of -the present invention is illustrated in FIGURE 6 wherein there is shown a generally flat-walled container or bottle modified to simulate a speedboat. The speedboat of this embodiment includes a substantially flat-bottom hull generally designated having a prow 72, a stern 74, and a substantially flat deck 76. Preferably, the speedboat also includes a cockpit 78 having a driver 80 therein and a tail fin 82. A cap 84 which may be similar to the cap 26 of the FIGURE l embodiment is screwed onto a neck of the container and may be removed in the conventional manner for access to the contents of the container.

Adjacent stern 74, the hull is provided with a pair of downwardly extending projections 86 which cooperate to form a longitudinal slot for the reception of a drive shaft 88. Shaft 88 is provided with a pair enlargements having bearing surfaces 90, and may be forced into position within the slot between lugs 86 in a manner similar 4to that discussed in connection with shaft 52 of the FIGURE 1 embodiment. A propeller 92 having a hub 94 is secured to the stern end of shaft 88. The opposite end of shaft 88 termina-tes in a hook 96 upon which one end of a rubber band 98 or similar elastic means is secured. The

other end of rubber band 98 may be looped over a capstan shaped keel portion or hull projection 100 which is located adjacent the prow. As is readily apparent, rubber band 98 may be wound by manually turning propeller 92. When the propeller is released, the unwinding of the rubber band will be effective to turn the propeller and thereby propel the boat through the water.

It will be noted that in this preferred embodiment, rubber band 98 is positioned beneath the subs-tantially flat bottomed hull 70 and is therefore particularly effective as a keel to stabilize the boat of this embodiment.

The containers of the present invention may be made of a suitable plastic material such as rubber, polyethylene, polybutadiene and the like. The container may be manufactured by blow molding, rotational molding and the like. If the container is made of rubber, it may be slush molded. l

Although the present invention has been described in connection with containers shaped to simulate speedboats, it will be appreciated that the present invention is not limited to the particular hull configuration disclosed above. The principles of the present invention are similarly applicable to containers shaped to simulate tugboats, fireboats, destroyers, submarinesand the like. In addition, it is apparent that the present invention'is susceptible of many other changes and modifications. Accordingly, it is intended to encompass all such changes and modifications as fall within the scope and spirit of the appended claims.

What is claimed is: y Y

1. A combined toy and container, comprising a receptacle shaped -to simulate a boat, said boat having a hull including a prow and a stern, an opening having a threaded neck portion for accessr to the receptacle projecting rearwardly from said stern, a cap operatively engaging said neck portion to close said opening, said hull at the bottom -thereof being provided with a longitudinally extending channel, a pair of projections integral with said hull adjacent opposite ends of said channel, each pair of projections defining a longitudinal slot therebetween, a first shaft nonrotatably received within the forward slot, a second shaft rotatably lreceived within the rear slot, means to limit longitudinal movement of said shafts within said slots, a propeller fastened to the rear end of said second shaft, and elastic band propulsion means `operatively connected between said first shaft and said second shaft.

2. A combined toy and container, comprising a receptacle shaped to simulate a speedboat and capable of holding a liquid, while being used. as a speedboat said speedboat having a hull including a prow and a stern, means for access to said receptacle projecting rearwardly from said stern, said hull at the bottom thereof being provided with a longitudinally extending channel, a pair of projections integral with said hull adjacent opposite ends of said channel and being capable of holding a liquid, while said toy is being used as a speedboat each pair of projections defining an essentially keyhole shaped longitudinal slot therebetween, a first shaft nonrotatably received within the forward slot, a second shaft rotatably received within the rear slot, each of said shafts having a diameter greater than the smallest width of said slots, means to limit longitudinal movement of said shafts within said slots, a propeller fastened to the rear end of said second shaft, and elastic band propulsion means operatively connected between said first shaft and said second shaft.

3. A combined -toy and container, comprising a receptacle shaped to simulate a boat, said boat having a hull including a prow and a stern, an opening having a threaded neck portion for access tothe interior of the receptacle projecting rearwardly of said stern, a cap operatively engaging said neck por-tion to close said opening, a pair of cooperating projections depending downwardly from said hull adjacent the stern, said projections defining an essentially keyhole shaped longitudinal slot therebetween, a shaft rotatably received within said slot, said slot having aneck portion of smaller width than the diameter of said shaft, said projections having a limited amount of resiliency to enable said shaft to be forced through the neck portion of said slot into operatively position, a propeller secured to the rear end of said shaft, a forward projection extending downwardly from said hull adjacent said prow, and elastic band propulsion means having one end secured to said forward projection and having its other end operatively connected to said shaft.

4. A combined toy and container, comprising a receptacle shaped to simulate a speedboat, said speedboat having a hull including a prow and a stern, an opening having a threaded neck portion for access to the interior of the receptacle projecting rearwardly of said stern, a cap operatively engaging said neck portion to close said opening, said hull having a substantially flat bottom, a pair of cooperating integral projections depending downwardly from said hull adjacent the stern, said projections defining an essentially keyhole shaped longitudinal slot therebetween, a shaft rotatably received within said slot, said slot having a neck portion of smaller width than the diameter of said shaft, said Vprojections having a limited amount of resiliency whereby said shaft may be forced through the neck portion of said slot into operative position, means to limit longitudinalmovement of said shaft with respect to said projections, a propeller secured to the rear end of said shaft, a capstan shaped projection extending downwardly from said'hull adjacent said prow, and elastic band propulsion means having one end looped over said capstan shaped projection and having its other end operatively connected to said shaft.

References Cited by the Examiner RICHARD` C. PINKHAM,VPrm'a1y Exraminer.

F. BARRY SHAY, Examiner.

L. I. BOVASSO, F. B. LEONARD, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1116215 *Jun 11, 1914Nov 3, 1914Henry BerghToy motor-boat.
US2519298 *Jun 25, 1948Aug 15, 1950Arthur Burroughs And Company LToy water-borne projectile
US2805516 *Jan 18, 1955Sep 10, 1957Felix PalmMilk carton convertible to a toy
US3120719 *Jul 17, 1961Feb 11, 1964Simonds June MToy making wheel assemblies
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4274223 *Feb 8, 1980Jun 23, 1981Marvin Glass & AssociatesWater toy
US4302003 *Aug 13, 1979Nov 24, 1981Hughes Thomas VWater toy
US6296540Aug 5, 1998Oct 2, 2001Playtex Products, Inc.Container, character toy, and toy combination
US20120228175 *Mar 7, 2011Sep 13, 2012Ressel Terrence BNovelty floating beverage holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/76
International ClassificationA63H23/00, A63H23/04, A63H29/00, A63H29/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63H23/04, A63H29/18
European ClassificationA63H23/04, A63H29/18