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Publication numberUS3305988 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1967
Filing dateJan 15, 1965
Priority dateJan 15, 1965
Publication numberUS 3305988 A, US 3305988A, US-A-3305988, US3305988 A, US3305988A
InventorsHalopoff Paul M
Original AssigneeHally Stamping & Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Truss anchorage
US 3305988 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1967 P. M. HALOPOFF TRUSS ANCHORAGE Filed Jan. 15, 1965 W 20 j il'hl Paul M 77%;

6 (geek/er Aron? United States Fatent' Ofifice Patented Feb. 28, 1967 3,305,988 TRUSS ANCHORAGE Paul M. Halopotf, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor to Hally Stamping & Mfg. (10., Los Angeles, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Jan. 15, 1965, Ser. No. 425,900 4 Claims. (Cl. 52-291) This invention relates generally to truss constructions for terminally supported members, such as overhead garage doors, for reinforcing such members against excessive deflection in the region between their end supports. The invention has more particular reference to novel truss anchorages for securing the ends of a truss brace to the member to be reinforced.

Most present-day garage doors are of the so-called overhead type. Such an overhead garage door comprises a door panel which is pivotally supported at its ends on the upright members of the door frame in such manner that the door panel is movable, with a compound rotational and translational motion, between a closed position, wherein the panel is vertically disposed within the door opening, and an open position, wherein the door panel is located in a horizontal, overhead position adjacent the upper edge of the door frame. When the door panel occupies this overhead open position, the weight of the panel tends to cause downward deflection, or sagging, of the panel in the region between its end supports. The greatest deflection of the panel, of course, occurs midway between the supports. For this reason, most, if not all overhead garage doors, are equipped with a truss which reinforces the door panels against sagging in this way. A typical truss for this purpose comprises a truss brace, such. as a metal rod or strap, which extends endwise of the door panel, over a raised bridge fixed to the center of the panel, and is anchored at its ends to the ends of the panel. A truss of this type is mounted on the side of the door panel which is lowermost when the panel occupies its overhead open position, whereby sagging of the panel tends to stretch the truss brace lengthwise and is thereby resisted by the tensile strength of the brace.

It will be immediately apparent to those skilled in the are that a truss of the kind discussed above is not limited in usefulness to garage doors. That is to say, any terminally supported member, particularly a terminally supported wooden member, tends to deflect or sag in the region between its end supports. Such deflection may be resisted by a truss of the character described.

It is a general object of this invention to provide novel truss anchorages for securing the ends of a truss brace to a member to be reinforced.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide novel truss anchorages for the purpose described wherein the anchorage elements which carry the major portion of the load exerted by the truss brace are equipped with prongs adapted to be driven into the member to be reinforced, thereby to effect secure attachment of said loadcarrying elements to the member.

A further object of the invention is to provide novel truss anchorages of the character described which are uniquely constructed to limit penetration of the anchorage prongs into the reinforced member.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of the invention, whereby the objects contemplated are attained, as hereinafter set forth, pointed out in the appended claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 illustrates a truss including a truss anchorage according to this invention;

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the truss anchorage in FIGURE 1 prior to driving of the anchorage prongs into the member to be reinforced;

FIGURE 3 illustrates the truss anchorage of FIGURE 2 after its prongs have been driven into the member to be reinforced;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the truss anchorage shown in FIGURES 2 and 3;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevation of a modified truss anchorage according to the invention, showing the anchorage prior to driving of its prongs into the member to be reinforced;

FIGURE 6 illustrates the truss anchorage in FIGURE 5 after its prongs have been driven into the member to be reinforced; and

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of the truss anchorage shown in FIGURES 5 and 6. I

FIGURE 1 illustrates a truss 10 of the kind described earlier mounted on the panel 12 of an overhead garage door. Truss 10 comprises a metal truss brace, or rod, 14, the ends of which are secured to the ends of the door panel 12 by means of truss anchorages 16 and 18. The center of the truss brace 14 extends through openings in the raised bridge 20 which is secured to the center of the door panel 12 and spaces the center of the truss brace from the panel. As noted earlier, the truss 10 is secured to the side of the door panel 12 which is lowermost when the panel occupies its overhead open position, whereby the truss reinforces the door panel against downward deflection, or sagging, in the region between its pivotal supports (not shown). The truss anchorage 16 comprises a conventional truss anchor bracket including a flange 22which projects outwardly from the door panel 12 and is perforated to receive one end of the truss brace 14. According to conventional practice, the truss brace is secured to the anchor bracket 16 by simply bending the end of the brace around the bracket flange 22, in the manner illustrated. The other truss anchorage 18 comprises an improved truss anchorage according to this invention and is illustrated in detail in FIGURES 2 through 4.

Referring to these latter figures, the improved truss anchorage 18 will be seen to comprise a sheet metal anchor bracket 24 which is fabricated by bending a metal strap to the configuration shown. The anchor bracket 24 includes a mounting flange 26 which is adapted to seat against the door panel 12 and has a central opening 28 to receive a fastener 30 for securing the amounting flange to the door panel. Preferably, the fastener 30 comprises a bolt, as shown. Anchor bracket 24 further includes a leg 32 which is joined to one edge of the mounting flange 26 and extends from the flange in a direction transverse to the plane of the flange. Located at the side of the bracket leg 32 remote from the mounting flange 26 is a second bracket leg 34. This second bracket leg is joined at one end and to the outer end of the bracket leg 32 and extends back toward the plane of the mounting flange 26 in diverging relation to the bracket leg 32. Extending from the end of the bracket leg 34 proximate to the plane of the mounting flange 26 are two prongs 36. As best shown in FIGURE 4, the prongs 36 are located in and are laterally spaced in the plane of the leg 34. Also extending from the latter end of the bracket leg 34, between the prongs 36 and in a direction away from the bracket leg 32, is a flange 38. Flange 38 is located in a plane generally parallel to the plane of the mounting flange 26 and transverse to the prongs 36. The bracket legs 32 and 34 have aligned openings 40 and 42, respectively.

At this point, it is significant to note that prior to final installation of the anchor bracket 24 on the door panel 12, the bracket leg 32 extends at an acute angle, slightly less than 90", relative to the mounting flange 26 of the bracket. It is also significant to note that in this preinstalled condition of the anchor bracket, the pointed ends of the prongs 36 are located proximate to, but do not project beyond, the plane of the mounting flange. Accordingly, when installing the anchor bracket on the door panel, the mounting flange is permitted to seat flat against the panel. After the mounting flange has been secured to the panel by means of the fastener 30, the outer, joined ends of the bracket legs 32 and 34 are struck with a hammer, or other suitable implement, to drive the bracket prongs 36 into the door panel to the position shown in FIGURE 3, wherein the bracket flange 38 seats against the panel. This latter flange is provided on the bracket primarily to limit penetration of the prongs into the panel. If desired, however, the flange 38 may be provided with a central opening 44 to receive a nail 42 or other fastener for securing the flange 38 to the door panel. This latter fastening is not required, however, since the prongs 36 provide firm attachment of the bracket leg 34 to the door panel. When the bracket legs 32 and 34 are struck, in the manner described above, to drive the prongs into the door panel, the bracket leg 32 is bent from its initial angular position relative to the mounting flange 26, shown in FIGURE 2, to its final angular position, shown in FIGURE 3, wherein the latter leg is approximately normal to the mounting flange.

The openings 40 and 42 in the bracket legs 32 and 34 receive the end of the truss brace 14. This end of the truss brace is threaded and mounts a nut 46 which may be tightened against the bracket leg 32 to prestress the truss brace to the desired initial tension. At this point, it is apparent that the bracket leg 34 forms the main load carrying element of the anchor bracket 24 and reinforces the bracket leg 32 against deflection under the reaction force exerted thereon by the tensioned truss brace 14. The prongs 36 on the bracket leg 34, penetrating the door panel 12 as they do, rigidly secure the adjacent end of the latter leg to the panel and prevent the leg from slipping relative to the panel. It is evident that the compressive force created in the bracket leg 34 by the ten sioned truss brace 14 firmly retains the prongs 36 in engagement with the door panel, whereby the fastener 42 for securing the bracket flange 38 to the panel may be eliminated, if desired, as already noted.

The modified anchor bracket 24a illustrated in FIG- URES and 7 is generally similar to the anchor bracket 24 just described and, like the latter bracket, includes a mounting flange 26a, a first leg 32a extending from one edge of the mounting flange 26a, transverse to the plane thereof, and a second leg 34a joined at one end to the outer end of the leg 32a and extending back toward the plane of the mounting flange 26a in diverging relation to the leg 32a. The modified anchor bracket also includes prongs 36a which are adapted to be driven into a door panel 12a, or other member to be reinforced, and a flange 38a for limiting penetration of the prongs into the panel.

In contrast to the earlier anchor bracket, the penetration limiting flange 38a in the modified bracket 24a extends substantially normal to the bracket leg 34a, away from and at an acute angle relative to the plane of the mounting flange 26a. The prongs 36a extend from the outer edge of the flange 38a back toward the plane of the mounting flange. Also, the bracket leg 32a is initially approximately normal to the mounting flange. Prior to final assembly of the modified anchor bracket 24a on the door panel 12a, the end of the bracketleg 34a from which extends the flange 38a, and the pointed ends of the prongs 36a are located proximate to but do not project beyond the plane of the mounting flange 26a, whereby the latter may be positioned flat against the door panel 12a, in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 5. When installing the modified anchor bracket 24a on the door panel 12a, the mounting flange 26a of the bracket issecured to the panel by a fastener 30a, as before. The flange 38a of the bracket is then struck, by a hammer or other implement, to drive the prongs 36a on the bracket into the panel to the position shown in FIGURE 6, wherein the flange 38a seats against the panel to limit penetration of the prongs into the panel. It will be observed that when the flange 38a is thus struck to drive the prongs into the panel, the flange is bent relative to the bracket leg 340. As in the earlier anchor bracket, the flange 380: may be provided with a central opening 44a to receive a nail 42a, or other fastener, for securing the latter flange to the panel. Here again, however, the fastening 42a is purely optional. The legs 32a, 34a of the modified anchor bracket have openings for receiving the truss brace 14, as before. In the drawings, however, only the opening 42a in the bracket leg 34a may be seen.

While the invention has herein been shown and described in what is conceived to be its most practical and preferred embodiment, it is to be recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention, which is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent devices.

Having described the invention, what is claimed as new in support of Letters Patent is:

I. A truss anchorage for securing one end of a truss brace to a member to be reinforced, comprising a truss anchor bracket including a mounting flange, a first leg joined at one end to and extending from said flange in a direction transverse to the plane of said flange, a second leg joined at one end to the opposite end of said first leg and extending back toward said plane in diverging relation to said first leg, means for securing said flange to said member, at least one prong comprising a longitudinal extension of the opposite end of said second leg and adapted to be driven into said member, a second flange on said second leg having an end attached to the second leg at a location adjacent said prong, said second flange being disposed in a plane transverse to the direction of extension of said prong and adapted to engage said member for limiting penetration of said prong into said member and providing a footing reacting against stress applied longitudinally of said second leg, and means on said legs adjacent the junction of said legs for operative engagement with said truss brace.

2. A truss anchorage for securing one end of a truss brace to a member to be reinforced, said anchorage comprising a sheet metal truss anchor bracket including a mounting flange, a first leg joined at one end to said flange along one edge of said flange and extending from said flange in a direction transverse to the plane of said flange, a second leg joined at one end to the opposite end of said first leg and extending back toward said plane in diverging relation to said first leg, said flange having an opening to receive a fastener for securing said flange to said member, at least one prong extending from the opposite end of said second leg and having its pointed end located proximate to said plane, a second flange on the second leg adjacent said prong and said second leg, whereby said mounting flange may be initially positioned flat against said member and said prong may thereafter be driven into said member, said prong when in place in said member being substantially in longitudinal alignment with said second leg whereby to pass stress from said legs to said member, said legs having aligned openings through which said truss brace is adapted to be inserted.

3. A trust anchorage for securing one end of a truss brace to a member to be reinforced, comprising a truss anchor bracket including a mounting flange, a first leg joined at One end to and extending from said flange in a direction transverse to the plane of said flange, a second leg joined at one end to the opposite end of said first leg and extending back toward said plane in diverging relation to said first leg, means for securing said flange to said member, at least one prong comprising a longitudinal extension of the opposite end of said second leg and adapted to be driven into said member, a second flange on said second leg having an end attached to the second leg at a location adjacent said prong and said second leg, said second flange being disposed in a plane transverse to the direction of extension of said prong and adapted to engage said member for limiting penetration of said prong into said member and providing a footing reacting against stress applied longitudinally of said second leg, a second prong extending from said opposite end of said second leg-in the plane of the latter leg and in spaced relation to said first mentioned prong, said second flange being located between said prongs, and means on said legs adjacent the junction of said legs for operative engagement with said truss brace.

4. A truss anchorage for securing one end of a truss brace to a member to be reinforced, comprising a sheet metal truss anchor bracket including a mounting flange, a first leg joined at one end to said flange along one edge thereof and extending from said flange in a direction transverse to the plane of said flange, a second leg at the side of said first leg remote from said flange and joined at one end to the opposite end of said first leg, said second leg extending back toward said plane and having its opposite end located proximate to said plane, a second flange joined along one edge to the opposite end of said second leg and extending transversely of the latter leg in a direction away from said plane, at least one iprong extending from the opposite end of said second flange back toward said plane and having its pointed end located proximate to said plane, whereby said mounting flange is adapted to be initially positioned flat against said member and said prong is adapted to be thereafter driven into said member to a position wherein said second flange seats against said member to limit penetration of said prong into said member, and said legs having aligned openings to receive said truss brace.

References Cited by the Examiner REINALDO P. MACHADO, Primary Examiner.

KENNETH DOWNEY, HARRISON R. MOSELEY,

Examiners,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1346736 *Oct 21, 1919Jul 13, 1920Allee William LeroyBrace
US2175688 *May 11, 1938Oct 10, 1939Frantz Mfg CoTruss brace construction
US2569284 *Jul 10, 1946Sep 25, 1951Bower Joseph EClamping device
CA683104A *Mar 31, 1964Robert J LytleFastening device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3958507 *Jun 19, 1974May 25, 1976Mitter & Co.Counter-pressure beam for use in screen printing machines and stiffening means therefor
US5893253 *May 16, 1997Apr 13, 1999E&E Engineering, Inc.Floor sag eliminator
US6834470Jul 25, 2002Dec 28, 2004Mitek Holdings, Inc.Structural framework, method of forming the framework and webs therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/291
International ClassificationE04C3/18, E04F21/00, E04C3/12, E04C3/29, E04C3/294
Cooperative ClassificationE04C3/294, E04C3/18, E04F21/0007
European ClassificationE04F21/00B, E04C3/294, E04C3/18