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Publication numberUS3306189 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1967
Filing dateJan 28, 1963
Priority dateJan 28, 1963
Publication numberUS 3306189 A, US 3306189A, US-A-3306189, US3306189 A, US3306189A
InventorsAntonino Alcamo
Original AssigneeAntonino Alcamo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dart-marking machine
US 3306189 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1967 A. ALcAMO DART-MARKING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 28, 1965 DOWNSTROKE 7 UPSTROK JNVENTOR. Q/v roAl/A/o ,QL cyq BY MOSE s, M? mew a Tone/u 15 TOQUEYS Feb. 28, 1967 A. ALCAMO 3,306,189

DART -MARKING MACHINE Filed Jan. 28, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG, 5

7 Kg/a 44 60 R I I 69'' EE 44 INVENTOR.

,qMroMm/O gleam 0 Patented Feb. 28, 1967 3,306,189 DART-MARKING MACHM Antonino Aleamo, 305 Graham Ave, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11211 Filed Jan. 28, 1963, Ser. No. 254,110 4 Claims. (Cl. 1011-26) This invention pertains, in general, to machines for marking darts in a plurality of sheet-like fabric pieces arranged in a pile; and, in particular, to a new and improved dart-marking machine, wherein cam control means operate a valve to allow a propellant driven dye substance, inside of a detachably-mounted container which is disposable when empty, to be ejected through a hollow needle as the needle is being withdrawn from a pile of fabric pieces, into which it has been driven, thereby leaving dye markings on each of the fabric pieces in the pile.

One object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved dart-marking machine.

Another object of the invention is to provide a dartmarking machine employing a sealed container holding a propellant ejectible dye substance, said container being detachably mounted on said machine so that the container can be disposed of when empty to permit a like full container to be used in the machine.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel dye substance which is advantageous for use in the marking of fabric pieces.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel cam follower mechanism for actuating valve means on a dye-holding container in response to movement of a hollow needle communicating with said valve means relative to a pile of fabric pieces.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel cam and cam follower mechanism with adjustment means for regulating the ejection of the dye substance from a dye-holding container.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a hollow needle having a novel needle point shape, which shape advantageously ensures true vertical motion of said needle into and out of said pile of fabrics.

The various features of novelty which characterize the invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and specific objects attained by its use, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which there is illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an elevational View, partly sectioned, of the dart-marking machine according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view, partly sectioned, illustrating the attitude of the novel cam follower arrangement, the dye holding container and the needle as they are in the initial stages of their downstroke movement toward the pile of fabric pieces;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary illustration, partly sectioned, showing the same elements as shown in FIG. 2, when the elements are in the initial stages of their upstroke movement when the hollow needle is being Withdrawn from the pile of fabric pieces;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view, in section, of the shape of the point of the hollow needle employed in the dartmarking machine of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is another fragmentary view showing the shape of the point of the hollow needle employed in the present invention from another vantage point;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevation view showing the base portion of the dark-marking machine of the present invention as employed with a shim, or block, useful for marking darts when a small thickness pile of fabric pieces is to be dye-marked;

FIG. 7 is a section view, as taken along the lines 7-7 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a section view, as taken along the lines 88 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 9 is a section view, as taken along the lines 9-9 of FIG. 1.

As is illustrated at FIG. 1, the dart-marking machine has a base plate through which there is a hole 21. As will be appreciated from the discussion hereinafter appearing, the purpose of the hole 21 is to permit a hollow needle 82 to be moved downwardly into a pile of fabric. Suitably fastened on the base plate 20 are the two internally threaded hollow hubs 22 and 23. The externally threaded ends of an upright guide shaft 24 are received in the internally threaded hub 22 and in a suitable internally threaded aperture (not shown) in a handle portion 25. Advantageously, the handle portion 25 allows the dart-marking machine of the present invention to be readily portable.

One end of an externally threaded hollow shaft 26 is threadably received by the internally threaded hollow hub 23. The other extremity of the hollow shaft 26 is similarly externally threaded and received in a suitable internally threaded aperture (not shown) in the handle portion 25. As illustrated at FIG. 1, there is situated within the hollow shaft 26 a spring 27. The hollow shaft 26 has, as is illustrated at FIG. 1, a longitudinal slot 28 extending therealong. The purpose of the longitudinal slot 28 and the hollow shaft 26 is described in more detail hereinafter.

Supported by screw means 30 and 31 between the handle portion 25 and the base plate 20 is an upright cam track support 29. A cam track 32 having, at opposite extremities thereof, the upper beveled edge 32a and the lower beveled edge 32]) is fastened to the surface of the upright support 29. Screws 33, having countersunk heads, and wing nuts 34 are employed in a con ventional manner so as to secure the cam track 32 to the upright support 29. As will be more fully appreciated from the discussion hereinafter appearing, the upper and lower beveled edges 32:; and 3212, respectively, of the cam track 32 serve as riser portions on a cam.

Arranged for sliding movement against the compression of the spring 27 along the shaft 26 and the guide shaft 24 is a carriage designated, generally, by the reference number 35. The carriage 35 is comprised of the integrally connected hand-gripping member 36 and the crosspiece 37. As indicated at FIG. 1, the hand gripping member 36, having a longitudinal bore therethrough, encompasses the shaft 26. In addition, the crosspiece 37 has a longitudinal bore therethrough and encompasses the guide shaft 24. In the attitude shown at FIG. 1, the integrally connected hand gripping member 36 and the crosspiece 37 are illustrated as being in their uppermost, or top stroke, position. By virtue of the longitudinal bores in the hand gripping member 36 and in the crosspiece 37, it will be appreciated that these integrally connected members 36 and 37 may be slid downwardly along the guide shaft 24 and the shaft 26 against the restraint of the spring 27, which will be compressed. As illustrated in the small sectioned portion shown at FIG. 1, there is affixed to the crosspiece 37 an engaging stud 38, or bar, which protrudes through the slot 28 in the shaft 26; the engaging stud 38 being in contact with an extremity of the spring 27. operationally, the operators hand encompassing the hand gripping member 36 moves the hand gripping member 36 and the integrally connected crosspiece 37 downwardly along the shafts 24 and 26 whereby the stud 38 compresses the spring 27. Of course, when the operator releases his hand from the hand gripping member 36, the compressed energy stored in the compressed spring 27 will cause the movable hand gripping member 36 and the crosspiece 37 to return to the attitude shown at FIG. 1.

As is shown at FIG. 1, a bracket 39 is fastened by the screws 40 to one end of the crosspieoe 37. Suitably supported by means of the nuts and bolts 42 and 41 on the bracket 39 are a support bracket 43 and a yoke member 44. The yoke member 44 supports a cam follower valve actuating mechanism designated, generally, by the reference number 60. In addition, a dye-holding container 80 is suitably supported so that, as the hand gripping member 36 and the crosspiece 37 are urged downwardly along the shafts 24 and 26, the dye-holding container '80 and the cam follower actuating mechanism 60 are moved to gether with the hand gripping member 36 and the crosspiece 37 (i.e., with the carriage 35).

As illustrated at FIG. 1, there is bonded to the surface of the support bracket 43 a bearing piece 45 which, together with the support bracket 43, laterally supports the dye-holding container 80. Advantageously, the bearing piece 45 may be cork, rubber, or the like, bonded to the support bracket 43. The surface of the bearing piece 45 adjacent the container '80 should have a shape which conforms to the shape of the container surface. For example, if container 80 is generally cylindrical, then the surface of the bearing piece 45 should be gene-rally circular. Also, the thickness dimension of the bearing piece 45 is chosen such that the longitudinal center line of the container 80 is properly aligned with respect to the end portion of the cam follower actuating mechanism 60 as shown at FIG. 1. A spring steel band-type clamp 46 having a wing nut fastener 47 at one end thereof cooperates with the support bracket 43, the bearing piece 45 and an additional bracket member 48 to secure the dyeholding container 80 in the position illustrated. In order to dispose of the container 89 when it has been emptied of its contents the wing nut fastener 47 may be manually loosened to expand the spring band clamp 46. After disposal a like full container can be arranged in the dartmarking machine in the same manner as shown in FIG. 1, the wing nut 47 and clamp 46 being tightened. The bracket member 48, as shown at FIG. 1, is situated underneath the band-type clamp 46 and in contact with the container 80. The shape of the surface of the bracket member 48 which is adjacent the surface of the container 80 is suitably shaped to conform to the containers surface shape. For example, if the container 80 is generally cylindrical, then the surface of the bracket member 48 which is adjacent the containers surface is generally circular. As illustrated at FIG. 1, the bottom portion of the bracket member 48 is bent over; part of the bentover portion being situated beneath an extremity of the cam follower actuating mechanism 60. Thus, the bentover portion of the bracket member 48 bears against the bottom end of an arm member 62 and, as will be more fully appreciated from the discussion hereinafter appearing and from FIGS. 2 and 3, holds the needle 82 in proper coupling relationship with the valve means 81, 81a of the container 80.

The dye-holding container 80 is a conventional container of the type used for the propellant dispensing of liquids, creams, vapors, gases, or the like. An example of one such container is disclosed in US. Patent 2,935,232, granted on May 3, 1960, to R. H. Thomas. At one end of the dye-holding container 80 there is provided a valve 81; the valve having a short tubular stem 81a associated therewith (see FIGS. 2 and 3). Associated with the valve and stem 81 and 81a of the dye-holding container 80 is the hollow needle 82 which, advantageously, is commercially available from surgical supply houses. It is a hypodermic needle. As is illustrated at FIGS. 2 and 3, the hollow needle 82 has at one end thereof an enlarged fitting 82a which is hollow. Integral with the hollow fitting 82a is a small hollow stub 82b. The internal diameter of the circular hollow stub 82b is chosen such that it may be fitted over the tubular stem 81a associated with the valve 81 of the container 80. A relatively snug fit between the outer surface of the stem 81a and the inner surface of the stub 82b is sufficient to provide a non-leak connection between the dye substance in the container 80 as it flows through the stem 81a, the hollow fitting 82a and the hollow needle 82 as the valve means associated with the container 80 is actuated in the manner hereinafter described. Thus, the snug fit of the stem 81a in hollow stub 82b and the nature of the wing nut 47 and spring clamp 46 arrangement, hereinbefore described, permit easy removal of container 86 when it has been emptied to permit alike filled container 80* to be detachably incorporated in the machine.

The cam follower actuating mechanism designated generally by the reference number is illustrated as to its components and operation in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 9. As shown, the cam follower actuating mechanism 60 is comprised of the two arm members 61 and 62. Both arm members 61 and 62 are generally in the form of channelshaped members. Mounted for rotation at one end of the arm member 61 is a wheel 63, the wheel 63 being journalled for rotation on a shaft 64. As indicated at FIGS. 8 and 9, the extremities of the shaft 64 are riveted to the side walls of the arm member 61. As indicated at FIG. 8, the wheel 63 includes an inner hub wheel 65 which, together with the outer wheel 63, forms a bearing race having the ball bearings 66 situated therebetween. Situated on each side of the inner hub wheel 65 and the outer wheel 63 are the apertured bearing members 67. The shaft 64- extends through the apertures in both hearing members 67. As may be appreciated from FIGS. 8 and 9, the purpose of the bearing members 67 is to ensure the lateral alignment of the wheel 63 so that it will always maintain its position while rolling, i.e., in the position illustrated at FIG. 9. The ends of the arm members 61 and 62 are commonly arranged for limited pivotal movement on a shaft 68, the side walls of the ends of the channel members 61 and 62 being suitably apertured to receive the shaft 68 as illustrated at FIG. 9. In addition, the shaft 68 passes through suitable apertures in the legs of the yoke 44 (FIG. 9).

Securely mounted at an end of the arm member 61 by the screw means 69 is the pillow block 70. The pillow block 70 has a nose portion 70a and a grooved upper portion 701); the nose portion 701: extending over from the end of the arm member 61 into the channel portion at the end of the arm member 62 as shown at FIGS. 2 and 9. As shown at FIGS. 2 and 9, the groove 70b of the pillow block 70 acts as a fulcrum for the arm member 61 by receiving the pivot shaft 68 which is nested therein. Also, as illustrated at FIGS. 2 and 9, a biasing spring 71 encompasses the pivot shaft 68. The biasing spring 71 has two end portions 71a and 71b; the end 71a bears against one surface of the yoke member 44 while the other end 7112 bears against the floor section of the channel-like arm member 61.

As is illustrated at FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 9, there is associated with the arm member 62 two adjustment screw means 72 and 74. A locking nut 73 is threadably engaged with the adjusting screw means 72 for adjusting the length of the screw 72, which protrudes upwardly from the channel-like arm member 62. Similarly, a locking nut threadably engages the adjusting screw means 74 and functions to enable the adjustment of the length of the screw means 74 which protrudes upwardly toward the face portion or rim of the container 89. The purposes served by the adjusting screw means 72 and 74 are hereinafter explained in greater detail.

Situated within the channel-like arm member 62 at an opposing end thereof is a floating block 76. FIGS. 1, 3, 7 and 9 show the arrangement of the floating block 76 together with the arm member 62 and the fitting 32a associated with the needle 82. As shown in FIGS. 7 and 9, two set screws 77 pass through suitable apertures in the side walls of the arm member 62 and the nose portion of the set screws also passes through suitable threaded apertures in the sides of the floating block 76 so that the noses of the set screws 77 bear against the sides of the fitting portion 82a, thereby holding the needle securely. As may be appreciated from FIG. 7, the lowermost surface of the floating block 76 is held a small distance from the floor or base of the channel-like arm member 62. Thus, as may be appreciated from FIGS. 1 and 3, the floating block 76 and the fitting portion 82a of the needle 82 allow pivotal movement of the arm members 61 and 62 while the floating block 76 is enabled to maintain a horizontal attitude, thereby maintaining the longitudinal central axis of the needle 82 perpendicular with respect to a longitudinal plane through the floating block 76 so that the needle 82 may enter and be withdrawn from the pile of fabric pieces in a substantially perpendicular attitude thereto. The floating block 76 can pivot, or rotate, to a limited degree about the axial screws 77.

FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 serve to illustrate the functioning of the various elements of the subject dart-marking machine. FIG. 1 illustrates the normal non-operated attitude of the subject dart-marking machine. FIG. 2 illustrates the initial stages of the downstroke movement of the container 80, needle 82 and the cam follower actuating mechanism 69; the cam follower wheel 63 having engaged the upper bevel edge 32a and beginning to roll downwardly along the cam track 32. FIG. 3 shows the container 80 and the cam follower actuating mechanism 69 in the initial stages of its upstroke movement or return, wherein the cam follower wheel 63 has engaged the lowermost riser portion 32b and is beginning to roll upwardly along the cam track 32. operationally, the operator manually grasps the hand gripping member 36, and with the downward force of his hand causes the carriage 35 to move downwardly against the compression of the spring 27 along the guide shaft 24 and the vertical shaft 26. After a very short movement from the position indicated at FIG. 1, the cam Wheel 63 engages the upper beveled edge 32:! of the cam track 32, thereby causing the arm member 61 to assume the tilted attitude shown at FIG. 2. As may be appreciated by reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, the biasing spring 71, coacting with the yoke member 44 and the floor portion or base of the channellike arm member 61, serves to maintain the channel member 61 in a horizontal attitude, the horizontal attitude of the arm member 61 being in horizontal alignment with the arm member 62 (FIG. 1). The arm member 62 is maintained in horizontal alignment by virtue of the action of the bent-over portion of the bracket member 48 and the suspension from shaft 68. The adjusting screw means 74 is, with the aid of the locking nut 75, set in the attitude shown at FIG. 1, so that the rim portion of the container 39 is at a predetermined fixed distance from the arm member 62. The principal function of the adjusting screw means 74 is to allow a presetting adjustment of the amount of pressure which will be (as is explained with reference to FIG. 3) exerted by the fitting 82a and hollow stub 82b against the hollow tubular stem 81a of the Valve means 81 on the container 80. The length of the screw 74 between the base of the arm member 62 and the rim of the container 80, as shown, may be regulated according to whether a greater or lesser amount of dye substance is to be discharged from the container through the hollow needle 82 into the fabric pieces in the pile. Also, as may be appreciated from viewing FIGS. 1 and 2, another adjusting screw means 72 and its associated lock nut 73 is effective to limit the tilt or are through which the arm member 61 may be rotated on the downstroke. As shown at FIG. 2, the movement of the nose portion 70a of the pillow block 74? is limited depending upon the length of the screw adjusting means 72 which protrudes upwardly from the base portion, or floor, of the arm member 61.

As may be appreciated from FIG. 2, during the downstroke the arm member 62 maintains its horizontal position while the arm member 61 is tilted, as shown. During the downstroke, the floating block 76 has its major plane maintained in a horizontal attitude such as that illustrated at FIG. 1. Also, during the downstroke, the arm member 62, being maintained in said horizontal attitude by the bracket member 4-8, the adjusting screw means 74 and the coacting adjusting screw means 72, does not allow motion of the arm member 61 to extend an upward pressure on the hollow tubular stem 81a of the valve means 81. Accordingly, during the downstroke, dye will not be communicated from the container 81) into the hollow needle 82.

When the cam following wheel 63 reaches the bottom of its downstroke, it rolls off the cam track 32 and onto the cam supporting track surface 29. As the operator allows the carriage 35 to ride upwardly by virtue of the compression forces of the spring 27 against the slight retarding force of his hand, the cam wheel 63 will engage the lowermost bevel portion, or riser, 32b of the cam track 32. Accordingly, the arm member 61 will be tilted in the reverse direction as indicated in FIG. 3. In addition, the end portion of the arm member 61 will abut against a mating arm portion of the arm member 62, thereby causing both arm members 61 and 62 to maintain the tilted alignment during the upstroke, shown at FIG. 3. During the upstroke, however, the floating block 76 maintains its horizontal attitude, as illustrated, clue to the fact that the floating block 76, being pivoted on the point or the nose portions of the set screws 77, allows the floating block 76 to maintain its horizontal attitude. During the upstroke, illustrated at FIG. 3, the extreme end portion or edge of the arm member 62 bears against an outer edge surface of the floating block 76, thereby exerting a component of force upwardly to cause the fitting 82a to apply a vertical component of force on the tubular stem 81a of the valve means 31. Accordingly, the valve means will be opened, allowing the propellant driven dye marking substance in the container 80 to run through the hollow portion of the needle 82 out through the end thereof and onto the pile of fabric during the upstroke. Accordingly, dye markings are left on each of the superimposed fabric pieces in the pile as the carriage 35 and the needle 82 coupled with the container 80 are withdrawn from the pile. After the carriage has been completely withdrawn upwardly, it assumes the normal attitude shown at FIG. 1.

For purposes of levelling the portable dart-marking machine hereinbefore described, there is included a spirit or bubble-type level 78 (FIGS. 1 and 6). Such spirit or bubble-type levels are commercially available. In plan view, they are generally circular so that the bubble may be centered within a small circular indicia mark on the top face of the bubble-type level 78. Accordingly, in a horizontal plane, the tilt in any direction thereon may be compensated in order to level the machine so that the needle 82 can be driven straight through the fabric pile.

Where a pile of relatively short thickness of fabric pieces is to be dart-marked, the arrangement illustrated at FIG. 6 is particularly advantageous. A shim plate, or block, 79 having an aperture 79a which is in register with the aperture 21 in the base plate 20 may be employed between the base plate 20 and the pile of fabric below the shim plate or block 79. For purposes of clarity, the pile of fabric is not shown in the drawing. An alternative way of providing for the marking of variable thickness piles of fabric would be to provide a longer or shorter needle 82. In addition, to accommodate the length of needle 82 which corresponds to the depth or thickness of the pile to be marked, the wing nuts 34 are advantageous in that different cam track portions may be easily substituted; these cam track portions having beveled edges 32a and 32b which are spaced different distances apart, as appropriate.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, there is shown a particularly advantageous feature of the present invention; namely, the employment of a hypodermic needle 82 having a uniquely shaped point portion which, in cooperation with the fabric pile to be dart-marked, aids the passage of the needle 82 in a substantially perpendicular direction through the plane of the pile. The point of the needle 82, as shown at FIGS. 4 and 5 in two views thereof, may be bent or ground to the shapes shown. In the side face shown at FIG. 4 and in the front face showing the hollow portions of the needle, the tip of the needle, about all surfaces thereof, is substantially symmetrical, thereby enabling the reaction force or pressure of the fabric pieces in the pile to exert equal components of force around the needle point as it is driven through and withdrawn from the pile, so that the needle 82 will not move askew of its true vertical position. It will be noted that the very tip or point of the needle is in line with the vertical or longitudinal central axis of the needle.

One feature of the dart-marking machine of the present invention is the employment of a novel dye substance which may, with a suitable propellant, be stored in the disposable container 80 and eventually be discharged on the upstroke of the carriage 35 into the pile of fabric pieces. Advantageously, the dye substance used may, with relative ease, be removed from the fabric pieces during conversion of the fabric into garments or the like. A steam iron or slight abrasion with a brush will remove all traces of the dye marks after they have served their marking purpose. I have discovered that a propellant dispensed dye substance prepared in the manner hereinafter set forth is advantageous for use when charged into the container 80 in the dart-marking machine of the present invention. According to one way in which the novel dye substance may be formulated, the following ingredients are used:

Parts by weight Water 45 Morpholine (tetrahydro-1,4-oxazine) 1.83.7

Nonyl phenylpolyethylene glycol ether, containing 10.5 moles of ethylene oxide (sold as Tergitol nonionic NPX by Union Carbide Chemicals Company) 2.6-3.3 Wax (e.g. beeswax) 2834 Stearic acid 8-11 Triethanolamine 4-5 To the water add triethanolamine, morpholine and stearic acid and the Tergitol monionic NPX. While heating this mixture to about 95 C., add the melted wax slowly while stirring. If desired, oil-based colors may be dissolved in the melted wax. I have found that Freon (4-10 parts by weight) will provide a suitable propellant for the aforementioned formulation.

While specific embodiments of the invention have been shown and described in detail to illustrate the application of the principles of the invention, it Will be understood that the invention may be embodied otherwise without departing from such principles.

What is claimed is:

1. A dart-marking machine comprising: carriage means; shaft means including spring means, said carriage means being manually slidable along said shaft means against restraint of said spring means; disposable sealed container means including valve means, said container means being detachably supported on said carriage means and movable therewith along said shaft means, said container means having therein a dye substance and a propellant substance; a needle including a longitudinal duct centrally therethrough, said needle being coupled with said valve means for communication of the duct with the interior of said container means and said dye substance and propellant substance therein; stationary cam means; and, cam follower means supported on said carriage means and movable therewith for actuation by said cam means for opening said valve means whereby said dye substance is propelled by said propellant substance through the duct of said needle in response to actuation of said cam follower means.

2. A dart-marking machine comprising: a base plate including an aperture therethrough; a block including handle means for carrying the dart-marking machine; guide shaft means extending between said base plate and block and secured to said plate and block; additional hollow shaft means extending between and secured to said base plate and block, said hollow shaft having a slot longitudinally therein; a spring situated within said additional hollow shaft; a carriage including two bore holes therethrough and having a stud afiixed thereto, said guide shaft extending through one bore hole, said hollow shaft extending through the other bore hole and said stud extending through the longitudinal slot and bearing against an end of said spring, said carriage being slidable along said shafts against the restraint of said spring as compressed by said stud; a sealed container including a valve supported on said carriage and movable therewith, said container being filled with a dye material and a material for propelling said dye material; a needle including a longitudinal duct therethrough coupled with said valve, said needle being movable together with said container and carriage; cam means secured between said block and base plate; and, cam follower means supported from said carriage and coupled with said needle for causing said needle to open said valve when said cam follower means engages a certain portion of said cam means.

3. A dart-marking machine comprising: carriage means; shaft means including spring means, said carriage means be-ing manually slidable along said shaft means against restraint of said spring means; disposable sealed container means, including valve means, supported on said carriage means and movable therewith along said shaft means, said container means having therein a dye substance and a propellant substance; a needle including a longitudinal duct centrally therethrough, said needle being coupled with said valve means for communication of the duct with the interior of said container means and said dye and said propellant substances therein; stationary cam means; and, cam follower means supported on said carriage means and movable therewith for actuation by said cam means for opening said valve means whereby said dye substance is propelled by said propellant substance through the duct of said needle in response to the actuation of said cam follower means, said cam follower means comprising a first arm member having a rotatable cam follower wheel at one end thereof adapted to rotatably follow said stationary cam means, pivot means at an opposite end of said first arm member, said pivot means being supported from said carriage means and enabling limited rotational movement of said first arm member thereabout, a second arm member having one end thereof pivotable through a limited arc about said pivot means, and a floating block including an aperture therethrough pivotally held a short distance away from the opposite end of said second arm member, said needle being supported by said floating block through the aperture thereof.

4. The dart-marking machine as defined by claim 3 further comprising adjustment means carried by said second 9 10 arm member to limit rotation of said first arm member 2,135,226 11/1938 Wolkan 10126 and to regulate the amount of dye substance which may 2,135,228 11/1938 Wolkan. be propelled from said container means through said valve 2,227,254- 12/ 1940 Glassberg et a1. 101-26 means and the duct of said needle. 2,466,293 4/1949 Alcamo 101-26 5 2,567,281 9/1951 Gardepe 106-27 References Cited by the Examiner 2,582,854 1/ 1952 Smith 10126 UNIT 2,778,297 11/ 1957 Fleisher 10126 ED STATES PATENTS 2,935,232 5/1960 Thomas 222162 999,824 8/1911 McCambell 101-26 1,606,662 11/ 1926 Pau1a et a1. 10627 10 WILLIAM PENN, Primary Examiner 1,771,399 7/1930 Chrlstophel 101-26

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US999824 *Dec 14, 1910Aug 8, 1911Theron MccampbellPuncturing and inking means.
US1606662 *May 26, 1925Nov 9, 1926Pawla Edith WTransferring composition
US1771399 *Oct 29, 1928Jul 29, 1930Wolf Machine CompanyMarking machine
US2135226 *Feb 24, 1937Nov 1, 1938Sprow Frederick FRacket holder
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US2227254 *Apr 27, 1939Dec 31, 1940Bernard ChesterMarking drill
US2466293 *Aug 19, 1947Apr 5, 1949Antonino AlcamoDart marker for fabrics
US2567281 *Feb 6, 1948Sep 11, 1951Sun Chemical CorpFlushed methyl violet inks
US2582854 *Aug 8, 1946Jan 15, 1952Wolf Machine CompanyCloth marking machine
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US2935232 *Oct 20, 1958May 3, 1960Bristol Myers CoInverted pressurized dispensers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3483818 *Apr 17, 1967Dec 16, 1969Hol Mark Machine CorpDevice for marking a plurality of plies of material
US4326648 *Feb 14, 1980Apr 27, 1982Deutsche Calypsolgesellschaft Mbh & Co.Holding device for holding a dispenser container
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/26, 222/162
International ClassificationD06H1/00, D06B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06B11/0056, D06H1/003
European ClassificationD06H1/00B, D06B11/00G