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Publication numberUS3306293 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1967
Filing dateJul 31, 1963
Priority dateJul 31, 1963
Also published asDE1435859A1
Publication numberUS 3306293 A, US 3306293A, US-A-3306293, US3306293 A, US3306293A
InventorsGeorge D Grippo, Herman L Marder, Werner O Tundermann
Original AssigneeColgate Palmolive Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable diaper
US 3306293 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1967 I H. L. MARDER ETAL 3,306,293

DISPOSABLE DIAPER Filed July 31, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS Herman L. Murder Werner 0. Tundermann George D. Grippo BY ATTORNEY Feb. 28 1967 Filed July 31, 1963 H. L. MARDER ETAL. D'ISPOSABLE DIAPER 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Herman L.Marde 'r Werner 0. Tundermonn George 0. Gnppa ATTORNEY 1967 H. MARDER ETAL 3,305,293

DISPOSABLE DIAPER Filed July 31, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I60 I7 I70 I40 ITO lOu INVENTORS Herman L. Marder Werner L. Tundermanm George D. Gn'ppo BY ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,306,293 DISPOSABLE DIAPER Herman L. Marder, Plainfield, Werner 0. Tundermann, Colonia, and George D. Grippo, New Brunswick, N.J., assignors to Colgate-Palmolive Company, New York,

N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed July 31, 1963, Ser. No. 298,904 15 Claims. (Cl. 128284) Although there are a number of disposable-type diapers known in the art, heretofore such diapers have not met with general consumer acceptance. It is apparent that a great need exists for disposable diapers which do not have the handicaps of those heretofore available and this need will establish a ready market for an acceptable diaper. It appears that the major factors limiting the use of disposable diapers are their high relative cost as well as the fact that the soiled articles do not lend themselves to convenient and sanitary disposal in quantity. Although the diapers in the prior art have had disposability in mind as an objective, they have not been satisfactory in that, either they do not have good mechanical strength in use, or they do not have the characteristic of rapid disintegrability and flushability in toilets. Generally, the prior art diapers have taken the form of a tube or pocket filled with an absorbent after which the pockets have been sealed along the ends. It has been found that the absorbent core as thus utilized has been either prone to come out of the ends of the pockets at inopportune times and results in deposition in part thereof on the wearer, or is so completely sealed within the tube so as not to be readily disintegratable and hence not flushable.

It is an object of this invention to provide a simple and inexpensive diaper which is adaptable for use with a plastic panty so that the latter provides a barrier to leakage of liquid waste while retaining the diaper in place.

Another object is the provision of a disposable diaper embodying an absorbent core having no wet strength which core is placed in an envelope of permeable material which has considerable mechanical strength when in a wet or dry state.

A further object of the invention is to provide a unitary diaper which includes an absorbent core of fibrous material of high absorbency and no wet strength so that when placed in a volume of water it will, with slight agitation, disintegrate into a slurry of fibers.

This invention also contemplates the provision of a novel disposable diaper which is shaped and formed so as to make it adaptable to snugly fit the wearer; and in which the envelope is very thin and limp, and is, therefore, readily disposable after separation from the no wet strength core, when flushed in a conventional toilet bowl along with the separated core.

Another object is to provide a disposable diaper which includes a relatively soft, smooth and non-abrasive envelope so as not to irritate wearers skin, and which will also be permeable to liquids.

Another object is the provision of a novel disposable diaper embodying an envelope which is so overlapped that, when arranged on a child and wetted by the childs waste, surface tension of the liquid film therebetween will cause the overlapped edges of the'envelope to stick together without the use of adhesive, and wherein the bond strength so developed adequately preserves the structural integrity of the diaper until deposited in the toilet. When so deposited, the non-adhesively adhered overlapped edges of the envelope tend to float apart and are further separated by the peeling forces developed by any slight agitation, such as the dipping of the diaper in the toilet bowl.

Still another object of this invention is the provision of a diaper wherein the disposal may be accomplished without the necessity for touching the soiled portion thereof when agitating the same in a toilet bowl.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be manifest from a consideration of the following specification and its accompanying drawings, wherein FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the invention, in one stage of its assembly:

FIGURE 2 is a view similar to FIGURE 1 in which another step in the assembly of the article is illustrated:

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURES 1 and 2 showing the diaper in its final assembled condition:

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view, partly broken away, taken substantially along line 4-4 of FIGURE 3:

FIGURE 5 is a front view illustrating the manner of positioning the diaper upon the body of a baby:

FIGURE 6 is a plan view of a modified embodiment of a disposable diaper formed in accordance with this invention:

FIGURE 7 is a plan view illustrating still another embodiment of a disposable diaper:

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view illustrating the manner of using the diaper illustrated in FIGURE 7:

FIGURES 9 and 10 are perspective views illustrating still further modifications which the invention may assume:

FIGURE 11 is a perspective view of a further embodiment, wherein the envelope parts are folded differently: and

FIGURE 12 is a sectional view, taken along the line 1212 of FIGURE 11.

Referring more particularly to the drawings wherein similar reference characters designate like parts throughout the several views, FIGURES 1 to 5, inclusive, illustrate a disposable diaper comprising a rectangular envelope member 10 which is thin and limp so that it may pass through the small orifice of the toilet bowl when suspended in water. It is also a material which is soft, smooth, and non-abrasive so that it will not irritate a childs skin and yet have a high wet strength. It should also be permeable to liquids and have a high wicking rate. An example of such a material from which the envelope member 10 may be formed is a high wet strength plasticized and bacteriostat impregnated paper commonly sold as diaper liner of 19 lbs. basis weight. Although the diaper liner paper is presently preferred, other materials, such as, lightweight, non-woven fabrics, or knitted meshes may be used.

superposed on the envelope member 10 and centrally and longitudinally arranged thereon is a core generally indicated at 11. This core is formed of a fibrous material having high absorbency and no wet strength. For example, Water leaf rnulti-ply crepe wadding or sulfite cellulose fluff, or a defibered flock of bleached, softwood Kraft fibers, or degreased cotton linters, or combinations thereof may be used. When the core is composed of tissue paper, in order to assist in the disintegration thereof upon being immersed in water, the core is preferably sub-divided into a plurality of lower sections 12 and plurality of overlying upper sections 13. The sections 12 and 18 are positioned in edge-to-edge relations-hip and extend transversely across the envelope member 10, as clearly shown in FIGURE 1, and the upper sections 13 are spaced inwardly of the ends of and overlie the abutting edges of the lower sections 12. On the other hand, if the core is formed of cellulose fluff, a solid core structure may be utilized, in an obvious manner, not shown. In other words, it may not be necessary to subdivide the core into sections.

It will be noted that the ends of the stacked sections 12 and 13 are spaced from the adjacent side edges of the envelope member 10, as shown in FIGURE 1, and that the marginal portions 14 of the envelope member are folded inwardly and over the core 11, as indicated in the overlapped position of FIGURE 2. The marginal portions 14 are then spot glued, as at 15, to the sections 12 and 13. The device is completed by positioning thereover another envelope member 16, of a material similar to, but not necessarily the same as, that of the envelope member 10, which sheet is of the same width as the folded envelope member 10 and substantially longer than the core, but terminates short of the ends of the envelope member 10. Sheet 16 is adhered to the exposed surfaces of the sections 12-13 of the core 11 by spot gluing, as at 17. The glue and 17 may be either of the water resistant or water soluble variety but, it is to be noted that the envelope member 16 is not glued directly to the envelope member 10, as this would prevent, or at least restrict, the separation of the core 11 from the envelope, while disposing of the used diaper in a toilet bowl. While the use of spot gluing has been described, it may be desirable to utilize lines, or other patterns of adhesive in lieu thereof. However, in either event, it is to be noted that the glue area should be located adjacent to the inturned marginal portions 14 of envelope member 10. 'It is also feasible to utilize embossing wherein the envelope members 16 and 10 are respectively caused to adhere to the core by the application of suitable pressure. It will, of course, be understood that stitching, needle punching, or any other common fastening media, not shown, may be utilized in lieu of glue, bearing in mind that members 10 and 16 of the envelope are fastened to the core, but are never secured to each other.

In the use of the aforesaid preferred form of the invention, it will be apparent that the diaper may be placed in customary position upon the body of a child, as indicated in FIGURE 5, whereupon the end portions of the envelope member 10 may be secured to adjacent clothing of the child, or the entire device held in position by plastic pants or the like. The ends of the envelope provide tabs which may be tucked over the childs plastic pants, as shown in FIGURE 5, and thereby act to retain the diaper in position on the child. It will be apparent that the composite envelope will act to retain the mechanical integrity of the diaper when soiled and when wet with urine and while being subjected to the disruptive action of the childs body movement.

When the diaper is worn and supported by the panty and thereby pressed against the wearers body, the core is restricted from coming out of the envelope, because the overlapped edges of envelope members 10 and 16, when Wet, are held together by the surface tension of the liquid therebetween. This force of the surface tension acts to preclude sliding or relative movement between t-he overlapping edges. When it is desired to dispose of the used diaper, it is only necessary to grasp one extended end thereof and place the diaper within the confines of a toilet bowl. Before flushing, the diaper is dipped in the water in the customary manner, commonly used by mothers to remove the bulk soil from cloth diapers. As the envelope members are respectively secured to the stacked core sections 1213 only, and not to each other, the action of the water, and the weight of the wet core, causes envelope member 16 to float away and peel downwardly off and to separate from the envelope member 10. As a result, the soil will be washed into the bowl with envelope member 16 and the core 11 will fall into the toilet and disintegrate into a slurry of fibers or small segments. Thereupon, the envelope member 10 may be allowed to drop into the bowl and the entire diaper may be flushed therethrough. Thus, the diaper and its contents is completely disposed of without soiling the hands of the person handling the same.

In FIGURE 6, there is shown an alternate embodiment of the diaper illustrated in FIGURES l to 5, in-

elusive, wherein the difference lies in the envelope ment ber 16A being wider than the envelope member 10 and its inturned marginal portions 14. In this case, the envelope member 16A may be folded under the envelope member 10. It will be apparent that the use and dis posal of this form of diaper will be identical with the previously described preferred form.

Another embodiment of disposable diaper is shown in FIGURES 7 and 8. In this case, the diaper corresponds to that illustrated in FIGURES l to 5, except that attached to each end portion thereof is a transversely extending strap member 18. It will be apparent that when this form of diaper is placed upon a babys body, it may be held in position by tying the end portions of each of the strap members 18, as at 19, to maintain the same in position upon the childs body without utilizing any other supporting means.

Referring to FIGURES 9 and 10, it will be noted that the diaper embodies a shaped core to provide a more comfortable fit. In FIGURE 9, the core consists of two spaced, transverse end sections 21 having three superposed elongated core strips 21' bridging the core sections 21 to effect a generally I-shape configuration. Another modified form of core structure is illustrated in FIGURE 10, wherein a three thickness core is employed, which includes only a single end section 21 and elongated top and bottom strips 21' and an intermediate two-part strip 21" interposed threbetween, generally approximating a T-shape configuration. In both the forms of FIGURES 9 and 10, it will be understood that the cores have been narrowed and shaped so as to provide a better fit in the crotch area. Thus, as the thin, limp, envelope will be caused to easily conform to the spatial confinement between the childs legs.

A modified form of envelope is illustrated in FIGURES 11 and 12, which differs from the preferred form shown in FIGURE 3 in that the envelope member 19A has only one marginal edge portion folded upwardly and inwardly, as at 14A, and the opposing marginal edge portion of envelope member 16A is folded inwardly, so as to overlie the other or unfolded side edge of member 10A as at 16B. Thus, the respective single folded marginal edges of members 10A and 16A oppose one another and, as shown in FIGURE 12, the envelope members 10A and 16A are, respectively, spot glued, as at 17A, to the core sections, and not to each other, in the same general manner as previously described. In this embodiment, it will be noted that the core sections 11 are arranged within What can generally be considered a tube constituted by the envelope members 10A and 16A. The member 16A is preferably of shorter length than member 10A so as to be spaced from the ends of the latter to provide handling and grasping tabs or portions on member 10A.

While a preferred embodiment and several modifications thereof have been illustrated and described, it is to be understood that various other modifications and improvements may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A diaper including a non wet strength absorbent core, an envelope including a pair of members, said members encasing said core to form a substantially flattened tube, said tube being open at its ends and substantially longer than said core, the corresponding longitudinal marginal edges of said envelope members being substantially in overlapped relationship so that when wet the envelope members are held together at the marginal edges by the surface tension of the liquid therebetween, said envelope members being secured to said core but unsecured to each other so that they become separated from each other when dipped in a toilet bowl.

2. A diaper as defined in claim 1 wherein said core is formed of a plurality of sections, said sections being of multiply tissue paper.

3. A diaper as defined in claim 1 wherein the envelope members are of unequal length to facilitate separation of said members when the diaper is suspended from an end and dipped in a toilet bowl.

4. A diaper as defined in claim 1 wherein the core is of a defibered flock cellulose material.

5. A diaper as defined in claim 2 where in said core is formed of a plurality of sections, said sections generally approximating an I-shape configuration.

6. A diaper as defined in claim 2 wherein said core is formed of a plurality of sections, said sections generally approximating a T-shaped configuration.

7. A diaper comprising an envelope of high wet strength material including a pair of substantially flat members, a substantially rectangular core interposed between said members, said core being of no Wet strength absorbent material, one of said members having its side marginal edges folded upon said core, and the other of said members being superposed on said core and marginal edges, means for securing said core to each of said members whereby when dipped into a toilet bowl the core will separate from the envelope and will be flushable through the toilet.

8. A diaper comprising an envelope of high wet strength material including a pair of substantially flat members, a substantially rectangular core interposed between said members, said core being of no Wet strength absorbent material, said core including a plurality of separable superposed sections, said core sections being spaced from the ends of said flat members, one of said members having side marginal edges folded upon said core, and the other of said members being superposed on said core and folded marginal edges so that when wet the envelope members are held together at the marginal edges by the surface tension of the liquid therebetween, means for adhesively securing the same side of said core to each of said members whereby the latter remain unsecured to each other so that when dipped into a toilet bowl the core will become separated from said envelope members and will be flushable through the toilet.

9. A diaper comprising an envelope of high wet strength material including a pair of substantially flat members, a substantially rectangular core interposed between said members, said core being of no wet strength absorbent material, said core including a plurality of separable superposed sections, said core sections being spaced from the ends of said flat members to provide handling tabs on said envelope, one of said flat members having side marginal edges folded upon said core, and the other of said flat members being superposed on said core and folded marginal edges so that when wet the envelope members are held together at the marginal edges by the surface tension of the liquid therebetween, said core being spot adhesively secured on the same side to each of said flat members whereby the latter remain unsecured to each other so that when handled by said 6 tabs and said core is dipped into a toilet bowl the core will 'become separated from said flat envelope members and will be flushable through the toilet.

10. A diaper comprising an envelope of high wet strength material including a pair of substantially flat members, a substantially rectangular core interposed between said members, one of said members having one marginal edge folded around and under said core, and the other of said members having one marginal edge folded over and inwardly of said core, said members being secured to said core but being unsecured from each other whereby when dipped into a toilet 'bowl the core will separate from the envelope and will be flushable through the toilet.

11. A diaper comprising an envelope of high wet strength material including a pair of substantially flat members, a substantially fiat rectangular core interposed between said members, said core being of no Wet strength absorbent material, one of said members having one marginal edge folded around and under said core, and the other of said members having an opposing marginal edge folded over and inwardly of said core, said members being secured .to said core 'but being unsecured from each other whereby when dipped into a toilet bowl the core will separate from the envelope and will be flushable through the toilet.

12. A diaper as defined in claim 8 wherein said core sections are positioned in edge-to-edge relation in a plurality of superposed rows.

13. A diaper as defined in claim 7 wherein a transverse strap is atfixed to each portion of one of said flat envelope members whereby said envelope and core are attachable to the wearer.

14. A diaper as defined in claim 2 wherein said core sections are arranged in layers.

15. A diaper as defined in claim 12 wherein said core sections are elongated end to end, said sections being superposed one on the other,

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,560,332 7/1951 Crane 128--287 2,649,858 8/1953 Le Bolt 128-284 2,649,859 8/1953 Hermanson et a1. 128-287 2,890,700 6/1959 Lonberg-Holm 128-284 3,071,138 1/1963 Garcia 128-290 3,106,207 10/1963 Dudley 128290 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,224,201 6/ 1960 France.

68,881 6/ 1945 Denmark.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner. C. F. ROSENBAUM, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3400717 *May 21, 1965Sep 10, 1968Colgate Palmolive CoDiapers
US3406688 *May 21, 1965Oct 22, 1968Colgate Palmolive CoDiaper with paper face
US3461871 *Jul 25, 1966Aug 19, 1969Blessings IncDisposable diaper
US3510587 *Mar 8, 1966May 5, 1970Colgate Palmolive CoDisposable diaper
US3776233 *May 17, 1971Dec 4, 1973Colgate Palmolive CoEdge contourable diaper
US4257418 *Jan 22, 1979Mar 24, 1981Mo Och Domsjo AktiebolagDevice for absorbing urine with incontinent persons
US5219342 *Jun 14, 1990Jun 15, 1993Hatch Janell MDisposable diapers
US5906602 *Mar 27, 1997May 25, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyShaped absorbent cores comprising multiple pieces of absorbent material and method for making same
US6932800Jul 23, 2001Aug 23, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent articles comprising a material having a high vertical wicking capacity
US6989005 *Mar 27, 1997Jan 24, 2006The Procter & Gamble Companyincludes backsheet substantially liquid impervious and an absorbent core between backsheet and topsheet; absorbent core includes non-removable component and a removable and replaceable component
US6989006Apr 9, 2003Jan 24, 2006The Procter And Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US7175613Mar 21, 2003Feb 13, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorptive product having removable absorbers
US7291137Apr 9, 2003Nov 6, 2007The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US7381202Jul 7, 2005Jun 3, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US7494483Jun 2, 2006Feb 24, 2009The Procter And Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US7601145Apr 9, 2003Oct 13, 2009The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US7670324Dec 3, 2002Mar 2, 2010The Procter And Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles with replaceable absorbent core components having regions of permeability and impermeability on same surface
US7727211Jun 2, 2005Jun 1, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article having a replaceable absorbent core component having an insertion pocket
US7727218Oct 29, 2007Jun 1, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US7766887Nov 13, 2006Aug 3, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making reusable disposable article
US7824386Oct 26, 2006Nov 2, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for using a disposable absorbent article as a swim pant
US7824387Oct 26, 2006Nov 2, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for using a disposable absorbent article as training pant
US7887524May 9, 2006Feb 15, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US8075542May 9, 2006Dec 13, 2011The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US8187241Dec 11, 2006May 29, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
US8192415Jun 2, 2006Jun 5, 2012The Procter & Gamble CompanyDisposable absorbent articles having multiple absorbent core components including replaceable components
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/364, 604/392, 604/360, 604/375, 604/365, 604/385.3
International ClassificationA61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/539, A61F13/515, A61F13/15211, A61F13/535
European ClassificationA61F13/515, A61F13/535, A61F13/539, A61F13/15J2