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Publication numberUS3306514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1967
Filing dateApr 13, 1965
Priority dateApr 13, 1965
Publication numberUS 3306514 A, US 3306514A, US-A-3306514, US3306514 A, US3306514A
InventorsMackendrick Robert G
Original AssigneeProcter & Gamble
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing carton
US 3306514 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1967 R. G. M KENDRICK DI SPENS I NG CARTON 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 15, 1965 INVENTOR. Robert G. MocKendrick BY% ATTORNEY 1967 R. G. M KENDRICK DISPENSING CARTON 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 13. 1965 Fig. 7

INVENTOR, Robert G. MucKendrick ATTORNEY poration of Ohio Filed Apr. 13, 1965, Ser. No. 447,683 1 Claim. (Cl. 229-17) This invention relates to an improvement in cartons. More particularly it relates to an improved dispensing carton having an extensible, reclosable pouring spout and being particularly advantageous for packaging and dispensing dry, flowable products.

Cartons adapted for packaging powdered, flaked, or granular products generally have provisions for an opening near the upper side edge of the carton. These provisions usually involve scores and perforations of various types. The usual type found on cartons containing soap powders or detergent granules is shown in US. Patent 2,039,437, issued May 5, 1936, to Jack H. Moore. The part of the carton having the perforations is depressed to break the perforations and, together with a portion of the top of the carton, is torn back to form a pouring opening. Although generally satisfactory, this type of pouring opening is sometimes blocked by the top flap, thereby making dispensing difficult. In addition, it is virtually impossible to reclose the carton in order to protect its contents.

A dispensing carton having an integral pouring spout which is also reclosable is described in US. Patent Re. 25,532, reissued on March 10, 1964, to Norman J. Asman. This carton is particularly adapted for conveniently dispensing dry, fiowable products. However, when dry, powdered products or products having fine granules are packaged therein, the carton tends to permit leakage or sifting at the junction of the pouring spout and the carton body.

Accordingly, it is a principal object of this invention to provide an improved dispensing carton which does not sift when filled with a finely powdered material.

Another object of the invention is to provide a sift proof dispensing carton which is capable of being reclosed.

Briefly stated, in accordance with one aspect of the invention, a carton is provided with an integral pouring spout formed from the upper part of a side panel and from the corresponding corners of each of the main panels. The side panel of the carton forms the front panel of the pouring spout and the portions of the main panels form the side panels of the spout. The spout so formed is hingedly attached to the carton by scorelines so as to be reclosable by folding the carton side panel inwardly toward the inside of the carton whereupon the spout side panels also fold inwardly and lie in superposed relationship with the main panels. In order to prevent leakage at the junction of the spout side panels and the corresponding edges defined by the carton top panel and main panel, sealing flaps are incorporated on the spout side panels, which flaps bear against the carton top when the spout is closed and thereby provide a seal to preclude product loss from around the spout side panels.

While the specification concludes with a claim particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter regarded as forming the present invention, it is believed the invention will be better understood from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of an integral blank suitably cut and scored to form a dispensing carton;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view, partially cut away, of the blank of FIGURE 1 partially set up and glued to form a carton shell;

United States Patent 3,306,514 Patented Feb. 28, 1967 FIGURE 3 is a perspective view, similar to FIGURE 2 showing a further stage in forming the completed carton;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view, partially cut away, of the completed carton;

FIGURE 5 is a cross-sectional view of the completed carton, taken along the line 55 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view, partially cut away, of the carton with the dispensing spout extended for pouring of the contained product; and

FIGURE 7 is a cross-section of the completed carton taken along the line 77 of FIGURE 4.

Referring first to FIGURE 1, the cartonis made of a single foldable blank A of flexible material such as paperboard. The blank A is divided by score lines 1023 and 34, cut lines 25-27 and cut-score lines 32, 33 into hingedly connected panels and flaps, including glue flap 40, main panels 41 and 42, side panels 43 and 44, dust flaps 45, end closure flaps 4648, spout side panels 49, spout front panel 50, spout tab 51, and spout sealing flaps 52.

End closure flaps 46 and 47 have lines of weakening impressed therein, such as perforation lines 2830 and cut-score line 31 which may or may not, as desired, terminate short of the edges of flap 47. These lines provide marginal portions 46a, 46b, 47a and 47b, which facilitate opening the spout of the closed set-up carton, as will be described in more detail hereinafter.

The blank A is formed into a glued carton shell by folding flap 40 and panel 41 about score line 11 to overlie panels 43 and 42, applying adhesive to the exposed surface of flap 40, and then folding panel 44 about score line 13 to overlie the adhesive surface of flap 40 and become adhered thereto. In such condition, the shell economically may be shipped to the product packager for set-up, filling and closing.

FIGURE 2 depicts an initial stage in closing the top of the carton. In forming the carton from the glued shell previously described, the shell is squared to position the panels 41, 43, 42 and 44 consecutively at right angles to each other. Spout front panel hingedly connected along terminating score line 16 is pressed inwardly so that spout side panels 49 lie in superposed relationship with and inwardly of main panels 41 and 42 and spout sealing flaps 52 lie in superposed relationship with and inwardly of top panels 46 and 47. As shown in FIG- URE 2, the spout front panel 50 lies inwardly of score lines 15 and is hingedly attached to the spout side panels 49 along score lines 23 and to side panel 43 along score line 16.

Spout sealing flaps 52 are folded downwardly along score lines 34 to lie parallel to a plane containing score lines 14 and 17. Spout tab 51 is then folded outwardly along score line 22 to overlie spout sealing flaps 52 and parallel to the top edges of main panels 41, 42 as defined by score lines 14 and 17, and dust flap 45 is folded inwardly along score line 18 to lie parallel to the top edges of the main panels. An adhesive is applied to the exposed upper surface of flap 45 and to the inside of marginal portion'47b, and end closure flap 4-7 is then folded inwardly in superposed relationship on spout tab 51 and dust fiap 45 and is adhered thereto, as shown in FIGURE 3. Closure of the top of the carton is completed by applying adhesive to the exposed upper surface of flap 47, and folding flap 46 over in adhering relation therewith. The completed top closure thus formed is shown in FIG- URES 4, 5 and 7. After the top of the carton is assembled, sifting of the product around side panels 49 is prevented by spout sealing flaps 52 which act to seal the joint formed by the edge of spout tab 51 and top panel 47. This is accomplished by the sealing flaps 52 bearing on the bottom of spout tab 51 with sufficient pressure toform a positive seal which prevents leakage of granular material from the carton along the upper edge of each spout side panel. This seal is effected without the use of adhesive.

The carton, having the top closed as just described, may then be filled with the product to be packaged by pouring or otherwise inserting the product through the unclosed bottom of the carton. The bottom may then be closed conventionally, by consecutively infolding flaps 45 and 48, with the one flap 48 superposed over and adhered to the other flap 48.

Referring also to FIGURE 6, in opening the carton the spout tab 51 and the glued portions 46a, 46b, 47a and 47b of the end closure flaps overlying it are pulled upward, causing a tearing action along cut-score lines 32 and 33, terminating at perforation line 28, and cutscore line 31. The spout tab 51 and the overlying glued portions 46b and 47b of the end closure flaps are then pulled outwardly away from perforation lines 28 and 29. This causes a tearing action along perforation lines 29 and 30 leaving portions 461) and 47b of the glued end closure flaps attached to the spout tab and free from the remainder of the end closure flaps. Tearing action occurs along perforation lines 29 and 30 rather than along perforation line 28 and cut-score line 31 since the bond is weaker along the first mentioned lines and also since the end of spout tab 51 is adhered to marginal portion 471) but not to marginal portion 47a. The spout may then be fully extended with the spout front panel 50 lying in a line with side panel 43, as shown in FIGURE 6. Spout side panels 49 provide a toggle action which tends to maintain the spout in open or extended position. The spout tab 51 can then be folded down outwardly to lie superposed on the spout front panel 50. Pressing the spout side panels 49 toward each other forces the spout front panel 50 to bend outwardly along score line 24, contributing further to the formation of a spout-like construction and thus facilitating pouring of the contents from the carton. Portions 46a and 47a of the end closure flaps overlie the edges 32 and 33 of the main panels. These portions serve to restrict the size of the pouring or dispensing opening and to help close the opening when the spout is reclosed as hereinafter described.

The carton is reclosed by releasing the pressure on spout side panels 49, lifting spout tab 51 until it is essentially perpendicular to the spout front panel 50 and pressing inwardly on the center of spout front panel 50. When the spout is partially closed, the toggle action of spout side panels 49 completes the closure and maintains the spout in recessed position essentially as shown in FIG- URE 4.

Several elements of the design are critical to the proper formation and function of the carton, among which are the angular relationships present in the geometry of the spout panels and the presence of spout sealing flaps 52 to prevent sifting. In the closed carton the upper edge of the spout front as defined by score lines 22 should extend to the intersection of perforated line 28 and partial cut line 31 with the top edges of the main panels 41, 42 defined by score lines 14 and 17, respectively. In order to obtain this relationship, and also have the spout front panel 50 co-planar with side panel 43 when the spout is fully extended, a particular relationship between the angles in the spout side panels must be employed. As shown in FIGURE 1, the angle formed by score lines 23 (comprising extensions of score lines 11 and 12, respectively), and is indicated by b and the angle between the upper scoire lines 34 of the spout side panels 49 and an extension of top edges 14, 17 of main panels 41 and 42, respectively, is denoted by a. With the spout closed, the angle formed by spout front panel 50 with an extension of side panel 43, i.e., the angle formed by a plane containing score lines 23 and a plane containing extensions of score lines 11 and 12, consequently will be 2b.

Angles a and b must bear a definite relationship to each other to assure proper formation of the carton. Since the angle defined by edge 53 and the extension of cutscore 32 is a right angle, the angle formed by edge 53 and score line 34 is therefore (90a) since the latter angle and angle a are complementary. The angle formed by the extension of score line 15 and edge 53 is equal to b since the corresponding sides of these angles are parallel. In forming the carton, spout side panel 49 is, in effect, rotated about score line 15 as an axis and therefore in order for score line 34 to be juxtaposed to cut score 32 when spout side panel 49 is folded in to lie superposed on main panel 41, the angle formed by score line 34 and the extension of score line 15 must be equal to the angle formed by cut score 32 and the extension of score line 15. Since the angle formed by the extension of score line 15 and edge 53 is equal to b as demon strated above, the angle formed by cut score 32 and the extension of score line 15 must be (90-b) since these two angles are complementary. Equating the latter angle, i.e. (90'b), with the angle formed by score line 34 and score line 15 extended, i.e., (90a+b), and solving this equation for a gives the result that a is equal to 2b. The use of this angular relationship insures the desired fit of the spout to the carton when in opened and closed position. A suitable set of angles would be 2223 for b and 45 for a although other pairs of angles may be employed, i.e., 30 and 60. Based on interrelated considerations such as the amount of board used in the carton, the size of the opening, and ease of opening and reclosing the carton, the use of 2230 and 45 angles is preferred. Obviously, since both sides of the spout are identical in construction the aforementioned relationship holds true for either side.

Although score lines 34 are juxtaposed to cut score lines 32 and 33, the differences in mass assembly of cartons permits leakage of product from around the spout. This sitting of product around the spout of a formed carton is effectively prevented by spout sealing flaps 52 which serve to provide a positive seal at the junction of the upper edge of the spout side panels 49 and cut score lines 32 and 33.

If the carton is to be completely emptied at the time it is first opened, the portions 46a, 46b, 47a and 47b of the end closure flaps may be integrally glued together and to tab 51 so that the tearing of the end closure flaps takes place at perforation line 28 and cut-score line 31, thereby providing a larger dispensing opening.

The present invention provides a carton construction incorporating a convenient pour spout. The carton requires a minimum of paperboard stock and can be readily set up, filled with the commodity to be packaged and sealed by automatic machinery. The carton has ample strength to withstand shipping and handling with out leakage of product contained therein or premature opening, and the design of the spout opening is such that the spout readily assumes its original position upon closing. Any conventional end closure means, such as that illustrated and described, may be employed on the end of the carton opposite the spout as those means do not constitute an inventive feature. It is to be understood that the size and shape of the carton and the material from which it is formed may be varied in numerous ways by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed as new is:

A reclosable dispensing carton formed of a single blank suitably cut and scored to provide a pair of opposed main panels, each of said panels having one of a pair of opposed edge-defining biased score lines extending from a lateral to a top edge near one corner thereof; a pair of opposed side panels hingedly connected to the lateral edges of said main panels, one of said side panels terminating in a score line at the point where said biased score lines intersect said lateral edges; a pair of bottom closure flaps hingedly connected to adjacent ends of said main panels; a pair of top closure flaps hingedly connected to adjacent ends of said main panels; a spout front panel hingedly connected to said one side panel along said terminating score line; a pair of opposed spout side panels each being superposed against and between said main panels and each hingedly connected along one edge to the edge of one of said main panels along said biased score lines, and hingedly connected along another edge to said spout front panel; a spout tab hingedly connected to the upper edge of said spout front panel lying in subposed relationship under and adhered to one of said top closure flaps and extending approximately to the upper termini of said biased score lines; a sealing flap hingedly connected to the upper edge of each of said opposed spout side panels, said sealing flaps positioned in underlying relationship to said spout tab and in non-adhesive contiguity therewith so that each sealing flap bears on the bottom of the spout tab along the conjunction of the spout side panel and the spout tab with sufiicient pressure to form a seal which prevents leakage of granular material from the carton along the upper edge of each spout side panel; said spout front panel forming an angle with an extension of said one side panel twice that of the angle formed by said biased score lines and said extension; and lines of weakness in said top closure flaps and along the score lines connecting said top closure flaps and said main panels to facilitate tearing to open the spout; said spout in opened position having said spout front panel and spout side panels lying coplanarly with said one side panel and said main panels respectively.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 25,532 3/1964 Asman 22917 3,123,275 3/1964 Bunger 229-17 3,133,688 5/1964 Asman 229-17 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

DAVIS T. MOORHEAD, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3123275 *Feb 9, 1962Mar 3, 1964 bunger
US3133688 *Sep 12, 1962May 19, 1964American Can CoReclosable angle spout carton
USRE25532 *Dec 1, 1960Mar 10, 1964 Dispensing carton
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3982683 *Jun 4, 1975Sep 28, 1976Standard Folding Cartons, Inc.Carton with pouring spout
US3995806 *Jul 11, 1975Dec 7, 1976Mcsherry ThomasStackable carton with reclosable pour spout construction
US4711389 *Sep 9, 1986Dec 8, 1987International Paper CompanySelf-supporting and spill resistant food carton
US5067615 *May 11, 1990Nov 26, 1991Edward DavitianReclosable box and blank therefor
US5069385 *Jun 12, 1990Dec 3, 1991Pkl Verpackungssystems GmbhCuboid gable package with a pouring spout arranged in the area of a flat top
US5114069 *Mar 27, 1991May 19, 1992Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Pack
US5125566 *Mar 18, 1991Jun 30, 1992Deiger Anthony JDispensing container with modified corner structure
US5176313 *Oct 13, 1989Jan 5, 1993Field Group LimitedCarton and blank for making the same
US5322211 *Mar 25, 1993Jun 21, 1994Schouw Packing A/SPackaging carton for dry, flowable products
US5326024 *Sep 29, 1993Jul 5, 1994Riverwood International CorporationCarton with reclosable pouring opening
US5402933 *Dec 23, 1993Apr 4, 1995Nestec S.A.Resealable pack having a locking grip-tab closure
US6419151 *Nov 2, 2001Jul 16, 2002Martin Gabriel UrtubeyPackage with integral retractile pouring spout
US6959857 *May 23, 2003Nov 1, 2005Meadwestvaco Packaging Systems, LlcDispensing feature with built-in ad panel
US20040232214 *May 23, 2003Nov 25, 2004Aaron BatesDispensing feature with built-in ad panel
US20050274781 *Jun 10, 2004Dec 15, 2005Petrelli J AReclosable container having an integral pour spout
US20050274782 *Jun 10, 2004Dec 15, 2005Petrelli J ABlank capable of forming a container having an integral pour spout
US20110079606 *Jun 25, 2009Apr 7, 2011Meadwestvaco CorporationDispenser for pouched contents
DE4010056A1 *Mar 29, 1990Oct 2, 1991Unilever NvVerpackung
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/219
International ClassificationB65D5/74
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/745
European ClassificationB65D5/74B3