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Publication numberUS3306612 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1967
Filing dateFeb 19, 1964
Priority dateFeb 19, 1964
Publication numberUS 3306612 A, US 3306612A, US-A-3306612, US3306612 A, US3306612A
InventorsRosen Leonard B
Original AssigneeRosen Leonard B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy exercise device with rotatable rings
US 3306612 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F eb. 28, 1967 L. B. ROSEN 3,306,612

TOY EXERCISE DEVICE WITH ROTATABLE RINGS Filed Feb. 19, 1964 8d I280 8& .81 9 /4 6 0 Leonard B. Rosen INVENTOR kMlk,

ATTORNEYS 3,306,612 TOY EXERCISE DEVICE WITH vROTATABLE RINGS Leonard B. Rosen, RD. 2, Jamestown, Pa.

Filed Feb. 19, 1964, Ser. No. 345,888

'. Claims. (Cl. 273-1) This invention relates generally to toys or games, and is particularly concerned with a toy or game of the type which can be used for entertainment as well as'exercise purposes. 7

There have been various previous suggestions of toys and/or games which can be used for entertainment and amusement purposes particularly for children and/or particularly for adults. However, there are very few such devices which are adapted to be used both by children and adults for both such purposes. Specifically, most of the prior toy-type exercising devices can be used by adults as well as children, but the adults normally find very little entertainment in using the same, On the other hand, there are some such devices which provide entertainment to adults, but normally their operation is sufficiently complex to prevent their use by children.

In contrast with prior types of devices which are directed specifically to either children or adults, the instant invention is concerned with the provision of a toy-type exercise device which can be used in various ways either by children or adults to provide entertainment to the user. Specifically, the present invention is directed to providing a toy-type exercising device which can be op erated in one way with minimum coordination and dexterity of the user, and which can be operated in other ways so as to require "a maximum of coordination and dexterity of the user. I

Aside from the primary object of providing a toy-type exercising device requiring different dexterities and coordinations for particular operations, the present invention has as one of its further objects the provision of such a device which can be easily constructed at minimum cost from existing components so as to be available for widespread use.

Still further additional, yet more specific objects of the present invention include: (a) the provision of such a toy-type exercising device which can be operated comparatively easily by using both hands, but which requires particular skill and/or practice for operation with a single hand; (b) the provision of such a device which includes a plurality of rings supported on a bar member so that the rings can be simultaneously orbitecl about the bar member in unison when the desired motion is achieved, and so that the rings will automatically be relatively displaced with respect with one another when the desired operating motion is not being utilized; (c) the provision of such a device wherein the bar member carries eccentrically offset handle grip means at respectively opposite ends thereof to facilitate operation of the device to achieve orbiting movement of the rings; (d) the provision of such a device wherein the rings are supported on rotatable ball members which revolve about the bar member with onbiting of the rings, and wherein additional ball members are incorporated which serve effectively as brakes to stop the orbiting motion of the ring members; and (e) the provision of such a device which is trouble-free with continued operation.

In its basic aspects, the preferred form of toy-type exercising device provided hereby includes an elongated bar member, a plurality of ball members rotatably supported on the bar member, a plurality of rings fixed to respective ball members for orbiting about the bar member, and prefer-ably handle grips disposed at the end of'the bar member so as to facilitate gripping thereof by one or more hands of the user.

United States Patent 0 The invention will be better understood, and'objects other than those set forth above will become apparent, after reading the following detailed description. Such description refers to the annexed drawings presenting preferred and illustrative embodiments of the invention. I

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a side view of a toy-type exercising de vice constructed in accordance herewith;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the device shown in FIGURE 1 as the same would appear in normal use with an operator gripping the same wit-h both hands;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmental perspective view ofthe de vice shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, but asthe same would appear when gripped only by one hand of-the user;

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of the device shown in FIG= URE l with the rings of the device in essentially collapsed position whereby the device can be easily shipped and stored;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmental detailed sectional view taken through one of the balls in the device of FIGURE 1, and showing the manner in which the ring members of' the device are secured to the balls thereof; and,

FIGURE 6 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line 66 of FIGURE 1 and showing the manner in which handle grips are coupled to the central bar member of the device. v

As indicated above, and as shown in FIGURES 1' through 4, the preferred form of a toy-type exercising device provided hereby includes a centrally elongated bar member 2, a pair of handle grips 4 and 6 secured to op.-' posite ends of the bar memberpa plurality of'balls8a, 8b, 80, etc., rotatably supported on the bar member 2, and a plurality of rings 10a, 10b, 100, etc., supported respectively on different associated balls 8a, 8b, 80, etc, Moreover, disposed inwardly of each of the handle grips 4 and 6, yet outwardly of the respective end balls 8a and 8g, are a pair of additional balls 12 and 14 which effectively serve as brakes in a manner explained more fully below.

The central bar member 2 can be formed of various differing types of materials including metal, sturdy plas tics and the like. In any event, such central bar memher 2 is preferably cylindrical in shape or circular in cross-section so as to easily rotatably support the balls thereon. The halls 8a-8g can similarly be made from various differing materials including metals and plastics, but preferably the balls are made of suitable plastic such" as polystyrene.

As best shown in FIGURE 5, each of the balls 8 is a hollow body which receives therethrough the central bar member 2. Moreover, each of the balls 8 has a pair of apertures 16 and 18 disposed in alignment with one another and in one-half of the bar member preferably the upper half thereof with'respect to the bar member. 7 Such apertures 16 and 18 receive therethrough an associated ring member 10. As shown in FIGURE 5, the ring members 10 are formed with their free ends secured perma;

nently together, as by a weld 20.

The preferred construction contemplates arranging the ring members so that the weld 20 in each is disposed interiorly of the periphery of the associated ball 8. This arrangement finds particular advantage when the rings 10 are constructed of metal and the weld 20 has an unattractive appearance. However, as should be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art, the rings can be constructed of plastic or other materials where the joint between the free ends would be attractive, in which event the disposition of the weld makes little difference. In

fact, the game is completely operative regardless of the location of the weld, and the disposition thereon within an associated ball 8 is merely a preferred feature.

Similarly, the balls 8 can be solid rather than hollow and the free ends of the rings can be received and secured in solid portions of the ball without actually mating with one another. The important factor to understand with respect to the cooperation between the rings and the balls is that the rings are so disposed that their periphery is offset from the elongated central bar member 2. In FIG- URE 5, this offset is indicated by the letter d. This offset relationship between the ring members and the central bar 2 can be regarded as an eccentric mounting. In this sense, the balls 8 serve as means for mounting the ring members ecccntrically with respect to the central bar member whereby the rings are orbitally movable about the central bar member.

Each of the balls 8, in addition to having a pair of apertures 16 and 18 therein, has a pair of aligned central apertures through which the bar member 2 projects. One such central aperture is shown in FIGURE 5 and is designated by the numeral 22. This aperture is dimensioned such that the ball is tightly received on the central bar member, and the corresponding aligned aperture is similarly dimensioned. Each of the balls 8 is thus rotatably mounted on the central bar member.

It is significant to note that the apertures in the balls 8 which receive the associated rings 10 are aligned in a direction perpendicular to the axis of alignment of the central apertures in the ball members. In other words, when the rings are in operating position, they are so fixed by the respective balls to the bar member that the'rings extend perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the central bar member. This feature permits the orbiting movement now t-o-be described.

By referring to FIGURE 2, it will be noted that the handle grips 4 and 6 can be easily grasped by both hands of the user. When such handle grips are so grasped, if the user imparts an orbital movement to the central bar member 2, the same causes the rings 10 to orbit about the central bar member 2. The rotation of the central bar member 2 is indicated by the arrow 24 in FIGURE 2, and the orbiting movement of the rings 10 is indicated by the arrow 26 in FIGURE 2. The object of the movement is to keep all of the rings 10, (i.e., rings 10a-10g) in alignment with one another and orbiting about the central bar member 2. With the device being grasped by both hands as shown in FIGURE 2, this motion can be comparatively easily accomplished by an adult or a child. However, since the operation requires a childs patience, and practice, both entertainment and exercises are provided.

While an adult may find the use of the device with both hands to be somewhat easy, the difliculty of achieving the desired result is substantially increased if the adult attempts to operate the device with a single hand, for example, as shown in FIGURE 3. The intended movement here again, is exactly the same as the intended movement shown in FIGURE 2. However, in this instance, the user must impart to the central bar member 2 an orbiting movement with one hand without also imparting thereto a wobbling movement. Any wobbling movement of the bar tends to destroy the uniform orbiting of the rings 10.

As a further alternative, a user can attempt to operate the device with the bar member 2 extending vertically. This is difiicult even if both hands are used, but such operation is rendered even more difiicult if the user attempts to obtain the orbiting movement with the bar vertically located and. with the device being operated by a single hand. These various positions and uses of the device indicate the manner in which entertainment is provided to persons of varying ages and depending upon the degree of coordination and dexterity which they possess.

When the device is being operated with both hands, as shown in FIGURE 2, the rings 10 tend to orbit at sub stantial speeds as the user becomes experienced with the device. It is thus desirable, often, to stop the device somewhat quickly. To this end, the additional or auxiliary balls 12 and 14 are incorporated. When it is desired to stop the device, the user need merely press inwardly on the respective balls 12 and 14, thereby causing the remaining balls 8a-8g to come into frictional engagement with one another. The friction between the balls applied by the respective auxiliary balls 12 and 14, and the friction with the central bar member resulting from some lateral pressure, causes the intermediate balls to essentially stop their rotation and in turn causes the rings to stop their orbiting movement.

The handle grips 4 and 6 can take various forms, and in fact, can be fabricated as an integral part of the central bar member 2. However, such handle grips preferably take a form somewhat similar to conventional bicycle handle bar grips. In any instant, consistent with the preferred embodiment hereof, the handle grips are so mounted that the central axisthereof is offset with respect to the central longitudinal axis of the bar member 2. In this regard, attention is directed to FIGURES 1 and 6. In FIGURE 1, it will be noted that the longitudinal central axis of the handle grip member 6 is designated as 30. The longitudinal central axis of the central bar member 2 is designated as 32. The offset between the axis 30 and the axis 32 is indicated by the letter D. This offset D preferably corresponds to the offset of the ring members with respect to the central bar member, i.e., the offset d, as shown in FIGURE 5. These respective offset relationships which have been described in some detail facilitate the uniform orbiting movement on the rings about the central bar member.

Although not specifically set forth above, it will be readily apparent that the rings 10 have a diameter which is substantially larger than the diameter of the central bar member 2i.e., the diameter of the central bar member 2 is but a small fractional part of the diameter of the rings 10. Moreover, from FIGURE 4 it will be apparent that the rings 10 are secured to their respective associated ball members so as to be pivotally movable with respect thereto. T-his pivotal movement is achieved with the arrangement as shown in FIGURE 5 and explained in detail above. Also, the extended position of the ring members as shown in FIGURES 1, 2 and 3 and the collapsed position of the ring members as shown in FIGURE 4 illustrate respective positions of the rings resulting from the pivotal movement in question.

Having now described the invention in considerable detail, it should be apparent that the objects set forth at the outset of the present specification have been successfully achieved. Accordingly what is claimed is:

1. A toy exercising device comprising, in combination, an elongated central bar member, a plurality of rings, and a plurality of ball members rotatably received on said central bar member and having said rings fixed respectively thereto, whereby orbital movement of said central bar member results in orbital movement of said rings thereabout said rings being fixed to said ball members respectively in offset relation to the central axis of said enlongated central bar member, said central bar member including handle grip means secured to opposite ends thereof, said handle grip means having a central longitudinal axis offset laterally from the central longitudinal axis of said central bar member.

2. The combination defined in claim 1 and further including an auxiliary pair of balls rotatably received on said central bar member and disposed respectively on opposite sides of said first mentioned balls.

3. A toy exercising device comprising an elongated central bar member, a plurality of rings, and a plurality of rotatable members mounted on said central bar member and having said rings fixed thereto, whereby orbital movement of said central bar members results in orbital movement of said rings thereabout, said rotatable members re-- spectively receiving different ones of said rings, said rings being secured to said rotatable members in laterally offset relation to the central longitudinal axis of said central bar member, said central bar member including handle grip means 'having central longitudinal axes laterally offset from said central longitudinal axis of said central bar member.

4. A toy exercising device comprising an axially elongated bar member having handle means at opposed ends thereof, a plurality of ball members rotatably mounted upon said bar member in side-by-side relationship, and a plurality of rings each of which is coupled to an individual ball member, each said ring being formed of a generally circularly-shaped strand of substantially rigid material, each of said strands engaging with an individual ball member at a location offset from the axis of said bar member to thereby assure that said rings are mounted eccentrically with respect to said bar member; said handle means being axially aligned with one another along an axis olfset from the axis of said bar member, said device being operable by holding at least one of said handle means and moving the same in an orbital path, whereupon said ball members will individually rotate relatively to said bar 5. A toy exercising device as defined in claim 4 wherein each ball member contains first aperture means forming a first passage through which said bar member passes and second aperture means forming a second passage through which said strand at least partially passes, said first and second passages being disposed in substantially perpendicular relationship with each other.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,858,145 5/1932 Felardo 46-51 2,956,369 10/1960 Rolin 4649 3,194,558 7/1965 Fowler 273109 OTHER REFERENCES Playthings, vol. 58, N0. 3, March 1960, page 388 relied on.

member thus causing said rings to orbitally travel about 0 RICHARD PINKHAM Primaly Examiner said bar member.

L. J. BOVASSO, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1858145 *Oct 25, 1930May 10, 1932Felardo AlfredToy
US2956369 *Nov 17, 1958Oct 18, 1960Kenneth C RolinToy
US3194558 *Sep 10, 1963Jul 13, 1965Jr Carl A FowlerWhirling amusement device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3545121 *Aug 14, 1968Dec 8, 1970Stephen R MiskoToy and exercising captive ball
US4004808 *Mar 29, 1976Jan 25, 1977Gerber Jon ASpiral manipulative game
US4018444 *Sep 25, 1975Apr 19, 1977Chew Jr Otto FRing whirling device
US4221074 *Jul 14, 1978Sep 9, 1980Reymundo GonzalezHoop toy
US5551933 *Feb 3, 1995Sep 3, 1996Applied Therapeutic Sciences, Inc.Wrist mobilization treatment device and method
US6413099 *Jun 25, 1997Jul 2, 2002John Desmond RaineyEducational device for teaching simple and complex mathematical concepts
US8702572 *Apr 8, 2011Apr 22, 2014Christine ChalkExercise ring
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/440, 482/44, 482/110, 446/266
International ClassificationA63B67/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63B67/08, A63B2208/12
European ClassificationA63B67/08