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Publication numberUS3306615 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1967
Filing dateApr 14, 1964
Priority dateApr 14, 1964
Publication numberUS 3306615 A, US 3306615A, US-A-3306615, US3306615 A, US3306615A
InventorsTack Oscar F
Original AssigneeTack Oscar F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toss game simulating bowling
US 3306615 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1:96? o. F. TACK 3,306,615

TOSS GAME SIMULATING BOWLING Filed April 14, 1964 l N VEN TOR. 05cm; f. TACK.

wzx q KM 3,306,615 TOSS GAME SIMULATING BOWLING Oscar F. Tack, 2919 Drexel, Detroit, Mich. 48215 Filed Apr. 14, 1964, Ser. No. 359,648 2 Claims. (Cl. 273-95) This invention relates generally to games and more particularly to toss games of skill for children.

It is an object of the invention to provide a game for children which involves skill and to some extent is educational in the matter of counting the score.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved game particularly for children and based on the well known or conventional ten pin bowling game.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved ten pin bowling game so conceived as to place it in that class of inexpensive games known as box games in which the entire game is played within the game containing box.

In connection with the next preceding object, it is an object of the invention to provide an inexpensive bowling game for children in which the conventional alley or lane is eliminated.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following description, taken in connection with the drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the game;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of certain pieces of the game, and

FIG. 3 is a plan view of FIG. 2.

Referring to the drawing by characters of reference, the game includes a box 10 having a cover 12, the box and its cover being inexpensively made of cardboard. The box 10 has a bottom wall 14, front wall 16, rear wall 18 and side walls 20. Preferably, the box cover 12 is made integral with the rear wall 18 and is bendable along line 22, as a hinge. As shown in FIG. 1, the box cover 12 is raised to a position at right angles to the box to provide a back stop and the cover may be held in this position by any suitable means such as the screw 24, washer 26 and wing nut 28. If desired, corner braces 30 having relatively right angle ends may be used and held in place by the screws to locate the cover at right angles to the box.

Positioned within the box 10 there is a triangular receiver formed by sides 32 and 34 and by a medial portion 36 of the box rear wall 22. The sides 32 and 34 of the receiver may be of the same height as the depth of the box, as shown, or may be somewhat less than the depth of the box, as desired. To attach the sides 32 and 34 of the receiver to the box 10, the sides may be formed with lower flanges 38 and end flanges 39 which may be secured respectively to the bottom and rear of the box by cement or staples.

The sides 32 and 34 of the receiver divide the box 10 into a relatively large no count area 14 and a relatively small triangular count area 40. The sides 32, 34 and the medial portion 36 of the box rear wall define a receiver which is representative of the outline or area of ten pins, as set in the conventional ten pin bowling game. In addition, the game includes ten count pieces 42 which represent the ten pins of the conventional bowling game. A stack of the pieces 42 is shown in FIG. 2 as being flat discs, and in the interests of economy of manufacture,

/United States Patent lCe the discs may be three quarter inch washers, as represented in FIG. 3.

In playing the game, the player takes all ten of the pin-representing discs 42 in one hand and tosses them together toward the triangular count area 40. A target 44 on the cover back stop is provided for the player as a guide and is located directly above the triangular count area 40. The target 44 is printed on the underside of the cover and preferably comprises a likeness of ten pins set in the conventional triangular formation of the conventional bowling game. If the tossed discs all remain Within the confines of the triangle area 40, it is counted as a strike, using the same system of scoring established for the conventional bowling game. Accordingly, a spare would be recorded Where only some of the discs remain within the triangular area 40 on the first toss and the player is successful in getting the remainder of the discs within the triangle on the second toss. Of course, if none of the discs remain in the triangular area 40, this would be the equivalent of the situation in conventional bowling where the ball completely misses the pins, such as a so called gutter ball, and no count would be recorded by the player for this toss, but if all ten discs are tossed into the remain within the triangular receiver on the second turn, the player would receive the benefit of a spare count as in conventional ten pin bowling.

In the triangular side member 32, a cutaway portion of the lower edge thereof near the rear wall 18 provides an opening 46 for passage of the discs 42 from the triangular area 40 to the no count area 14 by tilting the box. Also, an opening 48 is provided in the box front wall 16 adjacent one of the front corners so that all ten of the discs 42 may be readily retrieved by tilting the box toward the said corner.

From the foregoing description it will be appreciated that I have provided an improved game of skill which is particularly entertaining both for small children and adults and one which is inexpensive to manufacture. It will further be appreciated that the herein described game has many of the aspects of a conventional bowling game without the need of the large alley or lane area of the conventional game yet requires a degree of skill and training in the keeping of the score.

While I have shown and described my game and its structure in detail, it will be understood that many variations and changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A game of skill comprising a box, an upright backstop member extending upwardly from one side of said box, a pair of side members within said box cooperating with a medial portion of the said one side of said box to define a triangular enclosure, said enclosure dividing the interior of said box into a triangular count zone and a relatively larger no-count zone, said triangular enclosure representative of the outline of set ten pins, ten count pieces representative of ten pins and to be tossed collectively into the count zone, and an outlet in one side of the triangular structure for passage of the count pieces to the no-count zone by tilting of the box.

2. A game of skill comprising a box, an upright back stop member extending upwardly from one side of said box, a pair of side members within said box cooperating with a medial portion of the said one side of said box to define a triangular enclosure, said enclosure dividing the 0 interior of said box into a triangular count zone and a relatively larger no-count zone, said triangular enclosure representative of the outline of set ten pins, ten discs representative of ten pins and to be tossed collectively into the count zone, an outlet in one side of the triangular structure for passage of the discs to the no-count zone by tilting of the box, and an outlet in one side of said box for passage of said discs out of said box by tilting the latter.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2/1924 Skreberg 273-95 8/1943 Hoover 273-105 RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primaly Examiner. M. R. PAGE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1483488 *Sep 27, 1920Feb 12, 1924Skreberg HansGame
US2326859 *May 21, 1942Aug 17, 1943Harter S HooverIndoor game
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3794325 *Aug 12, 1971Feb 26, 1974Stender HTarget cups in ten pin configuration and projector having force varying capability
US4012042 *Jan 19, 1976Mar 15, 1977Blasingame Steve JInvertible pocketed target for a disc throwing game
US5282635 *May 11, 1993Feb 1, 1994Hopkins Randolph MMarker toss game
US9095754 *Apr 8, 2011Aug 4, 2015Michael CerpokBall game apparatus and method
US20110123968 *Nov 24, 2009May 26, 2011Mclaughlin Corey JohnHand-held educational game
US20110183785 *Apr 8, 2011Jul 28, 2011Michael CerpokBall game apparatus and method
US20120043723 *Aug 19, 2010Feb 23, 2012Everett RakesTossing Game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/400, 273/317.1
International ClassificationA63F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0204
European ClassificationA63F9/02B