Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3306793 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1967
Filing dateFeb 7, 1964
Priority dateMar 15, 1963
Also published asDE1590543A1
Publication numberUS 3306793 A, US 3306793A, US-A-3306793, US3306793 A, US3306793A
InventorsAlan Morel Gerald, Yaxley Gill Ronald
Original AssigneeInt Standard Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making coaxial cables
US 3306793 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1967 R. Y. GILL ETAL METHOD OF MAKING COAXIAL CABLES 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 7, 1964 Inventors RON/440 Y. 67!. L GER/l4 By% 0 AJVOREL Feb. 28, 1967 R. Y. GILL ETAL METHOD OF MAKING COAXIAL CABLES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 7, 1964 mo m M w w Lm n A w 0 rm M w N A) 0 m R 6 y United States Patent 3,306,793 METHOD OF MAKING COAXIAL CABLES Ronald Yaxley Gill and Gerald Alan Morel, both of London, England, assignors to International Standard Electric Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed Feb. 7, 1964, Ser. No. 343,240 Claims priority, application Great Britain, Mar. 15, 1963, 10,367/63 3 Claims. (Cl. 156-54) This invention relates to coaxial cables.

According to the present invention there is provided a coaxial cable which includes an inner conductor, an outer conductor and a tube of electrical insulating material supporting the outer conductor and composed of at least one folded strip provided with projections which support the inner conductor.

Further according to the present invention there is provided a method of manufacturing a coaxial cable which includes the steps forming projections on a strip of electrical insulating material; folding the strip round an inner conductor to form a tube with the projections supporting the inner conductor along the centre of the tube and applying an outer tubular conductor to the outer surface of the tube.

In the accompanying drawings which, by way of example, illustrate diagrammatically embodiments of the present invention:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a strip of polythene;

FIG. 2 is an end view in the direction of arrow X of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a coaxial cable cut away to reveal the strip shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is an end view of an alternative polythene strip to that shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a polythene strip;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a coaxial cable cut away to reveal the strip shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a polythene strip; and

FIG. 8 is a partly sectioned side view of a coaxial cable including the strip shown in FIG. 6.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 a polythene strip 1 is provided with projections 2. In the end view (FIG. 2) the projections 2 have the shape of isosceles triangles with angle A equal to 120. The sides 3 and 4 of the strip 1 are in the same plane as the sides of the projections adjacent to them.

In FIG. 3 the strip 1 is shown longitudinally folded round an inner conductor 5 so that the projections 2 form discs 7 spaced along it and the whole is enclosed in an outer conductor 6.

The strip 1 with the projections 2 may be produced in any known manner from a preformed strip, for example, by passing a preformed polythene strip between heated forming rollers or by vacuum forming. When the strip 1 has been formed with the projections 2 it is longitudinally folded round an inner conductor 5 which is being unreeled from a supply drum. An outer conductor 6 is then folded round the strip 1 by, for example, longitudinally folding a copper strip round the strip 1 with its longitudinal edges diametrically opposite those of the strip 1. The whole may then be screened with a helically or longitudinally applied steel tape to constitute a coaxial cable core of a single or multi-core cable.

If desired the strip 1 may be wound helically upon the inner conductor 1 and the bands of projections 2 arranged at a suitable angle across the strip 1 to form the discs 7.

The strip 1 may be divided longitudinally into a num- Referring to FIG. 4 there is shown an alternative polythene strip 8 provided with projections 9 which are the same shape as the projections 2 (FIG. 2). The strip 8 is curved at the base of the projections 9 to the same curvature that the strip 8 takes when it is folded round the inner conductor 5 (FIG. 3). .By curving the strip 8 in this manner the tendency of the strip 8 to form flats at these places when it is folded round the inner conductor 5 is avoided.

Referring to FIGS. 5 and 6 the provided with alternate bands 11 and 12 of projections. The projections 13 on the band 11 are the same as the projections 2 (FIG. 2). The intermediate projections 14 on the band 12 are the same as the projections 2 (FIG. 2) whilst the end projections 15 together form a projection 2 (FIG. 2) when the strip 10 is folded round an inner conductor 16.

When the strip 10 is folded round the inner conductor 16 the meeting edges of the projections 13 are angularly displaced from the meeting edges of the projections 14. In this manner the projections 13 and 14 tend to hold the inner conductor 16 more rigidly in a central position. An outer conductor 17 is placed round the folded strip 10 in the same manner as in FIG. 2.

Refer-ring to FIGS. 7 and 8 there is shown a polythene strip 18 provided with bands 19 of projections 20 which cross the strip 18 at an angle. The bands 19 are so polythene strip 10 is arranged that when the strip 218 is longitudinally folded her of strips which are placed side by side round the in- 7 ner conductor 5.

round an inner conductor 21 the projections 20 form a continuous 'helix 22 round it. An outer conductor 23 is provided in the same manner as in FIG. 2.

A continuous helix 22 could also be provided by providing a strip 20 with a longitudinal band of projections 20 and winding the strip 20 about the conductor 21 in a helical manner.

In either case a number of parallel helices 22 may be provided by suitably sloping the bands 19 across the strip 18 when it is longitudinally folded round the inner conductor 21 or by providing a number of longitudinal bands 19 along the strip 18 when the strip 18 is applied helically to the inner conductor 21.

By forming the projections on the polythene strip on the top of a heated metal strip which is to form the outer conductor these two members may be bonded together and applied to the inner conductor in one operation.

It is to be understood that the following description of specific examples of this invention is not to be considered as a limitation on its scope.

What we claim is:

1. A method of manufacturing a coaxial cable comprising a continuous longitudinal strip of electrical insulating material which includes the steps of:

forming on a continuous longitudinal strip of electrical insulating material groups of relatively thin contiguous triangulated projections of the same insulating material joined at their base and arrayed thereon transverse to the longitudinal axis thereof;

folding said strip longitudinally about an inner conductor to form a continuous tube so that said projections extend inwardly therefrom and the edges of adjacent projections meet to surround and support said inner conductor centrally and form a plurality of supports at spaced intervals along the length thereof; and

applying an outer tubular conductor to the outer surface of said tube.

2. A method as claimed in claim 1 including forming groups of said projections at right angles across said strip to form dis-c supports when folded round said inner conductor at spaced intervals along its length.

3. A method as claimed in claim 1 including forming 3 4 said projections diagonally across said strip to form a 2,897,542 8/ 1959 Isenberg. I helical support. 3,117,902 1/1964 Holz'heinier 1 l56217 References Cited by the Examiner FOREIGN PATENTS UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 428,390 6/ 1911 France- 1,939,264 12/1933 Hill 17429 X 2,269,991 1/1942 Soheldorf 174-28 x LEWIS MYERS W 2,330,381 9/ 1943 Quayle l74--28 J. F. BURNS, D. A. KETTLESTRING'S, H. HUBER- 2;643,327 6/ 1953 Macklenar 174-28 X FELD, Assistant Examiners.

2,890,739 6/1959 Haines 1562l8 X 10

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1939264 *Jan 3, 1931Dec 12, 1933Callenders Cable & Const CoElectric cable
US2269991 *Mar 8, 1940Jan 13, 1942Gen ElectricHigh frequency transmission line
US2330381 *May 12, 1942Sep 28, 1943Int Standard Electric CorpElectric communication cable
US2643327 *Dec 22, 1949Jun 23, 1953Albert H MacklenarVentilated insulating spacing shield for flashlight dry cells
US2890739 *Nov 30, 1954Jun 16, 1959Armstrong Cork CoSegmented insulation and method of installing the same
US2897542 *Dec 5, 1952Aug 4, 1959Isenberg Hans DApparatus for forming coaxial cables
US3117902 *Oct 20, 1958Jan 14, 1964Fastab Insulations IncInsulating coverings for enclosures
FR428390A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3629941 *Mar 20, 1968Dec 28, 1971Kabel Metallwerke GhhMethod of forming coaxial conductors of small diameters
US3996414 *Jul 26, 1973Dec 7, 1976Kabel-Und Metallwerke Gutehoffnungshutte AktiengesellschaftSpacer construction for gas insulated high voltage cable
US4859534 *Mar 16, 1988Aug 22, 1989Chemical Vulcanising Systems (Proprietary) LimitedMethod and apparatus for repairing a cable
US5880402 *Jul 22, 1996Mar 9, 1999Nugent; Steven FloydHigh fidelity audio interconnect cable
US6653555Nov 6, 2001Nov 25, 2003Steven Floyd NugentBare-wire interconnect
US8579886May 1, 2007Nov 12, 2013Covidien LpAccordion style cable stand-off
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/54, 174/99.00R, 174/29, 29/828, 156/217, 174/28, 333/244
International ClassificationH01B13/06, H01B11/18
Cooperative ClassificationH01B11/1834, H01B11/1826, H01B13/067
European ClassificationH01B11/18B8, H01B11/18D, H01B13/06R