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Publication numberUS3307485 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1967
Filing dateOct 13, 1965
Priority dateOct 13, 1965
Publication numberUS 3307485 A, US 3307485A, US-A-3307485, US3307485 A, US3307485A
InventorsLeland H Logue
Original AssigneeDenver Equip Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 3307485 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 7, 1967 l... H. LOGUE PUMP 5 SheetsSheet 1 Filed Oct. '15, 1965 IN VENT OR. LELAND H. LOGUE AITORNEYS 1.. H. LOGUE 3,307,485

PUMP

5 Sheets-Sheet 2 I March 7, 1967 Filed Oct. 13, 1965 IN VENTOR.

LELAND H. LOGUE u. I v 1 Wk 1 4 I ATTORNEYS March 7, 1967 L. H. LQGUE v 3,307,485

PUMP

FiledOct. 13, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 LELAND H; Loews V ORNEY United States Patent C 3,307,485 PUMP Leland H. Logue, Denver, Colo., assignor to Denver Equipment Company, Denver, Colo., a corporation of Colorado Filed Oct. 13, 1965, Ser. No. 495,406 7 Claims. (Cl. 103-101) This invention relates to pumps and particularly to pumps of the type disclosed in application Ser. No. 301,312 filed Aug. 12, 1963, now Patent No. 3,218,982 assigned to the same assignee.

As noted in the above referred to copending application, liquids such as low density pulps and acid solutions present particular problems for known pumps which have a relatively large number of moving parts and internal moving parts.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a novel pump which is simple in construction, has few moving parts and is particularly durable for pumping liquids such as acid solutions and low density pulps.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel pump with no internal moving parts and which requires only a single seal on the inlet or suction side and no seal on the outlet or discharge side of the pump.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a novel pump which is easily adapted for connection to transport lines of various orientations.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty which characterize my invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification.

For a better understanding of my invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a sectional side elevation view showing a pump, mount and motor drive as an integral assembly embodying my invention;

PEG. 2 is a sectional view taken along lines 22 of FIG. 1 showing the discharge passage of the stator;

FIG. 3 is an end elevation view of the casing shell shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view through the inlet and outlet passages of an alternate manifold for the pump shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the mount and drive motor supported thereon embodying my invention;

FIG. 6 is an end elevation view of the mount and drive motor shown in FIG. 5.

Referring now to the drawing the novel pump embodying my invention generally comprises a rotary member 1 and a stationary member 2 arranged in a generally symmetrical relationship about the axis of rotation of the rotary member.

Rotary member 1 includes a hollow casing split into a funnel-shaped shell or disc-like head member 4 having an upstream passage 5 concentric with its axis of rotation and a head or disc-like head member 6 to provide access into its interior. The head 6 has a hub 8 protruding centrally of its outer surf-ace for direct coupling of the rotary shaft of the drive motor to the pump.

The casing head 6 is detachably secured to the casing shell 4 at their peripheries by a plurality of fasteners 9 disposed in alined circumferentially spaced apertures in the head and shell. A seal 10 preferably of O-ring type is held between the abutting surfaces of the head and shell for pressure sealing of the casing.

An impeller 11 (-FIG. 3) is provided by a plurality of helical blades or vanes 12 which are disposed on the inclined inner surface of the casing shell 4 inwardly of the upstream passage which are preferably formed 3,307,485 Patented Mar. 7, 1967 as a part of the shell. For some applications the impeller blades may be detachably supported on the casing. The direction of rotation of the blades is indicated as clockwise as viewed in FIG. 3.

Stationary member 2 includes a stator 14 generally disposed interiorly of the casing and a manifold 15 generally disposed exteriorly of the casing. The stator and manifold are detachably secured by a threaded connection at 16.

In section the stator 14 conforms with the inner surface of the hollow casing with a slight gap therebetween. Stator 14 has a smooth inclined exterior surface 18 facing the inner inclined surface of the casing shell inclusive of the impeller 11 and defines therewith an axial or radial intake passage 19 interiorly of the casing which narrows toward its discharge end. i

A discharge passage 21 is formed in the stator 14 which includes an intake portion or restricted opening 21a concentric with the axis of rotation for receiving the output of the passage 19 and connects with an axial or radial portion 21b extending axially or radially from the intake portion 21a and widens toward its discharge end, and a discharge portion 210 concentric with the axis of rotation. The discharge passage 21 including portions 21a, 21b and 210 is thus formed entirely by stationary surfaces. Protruding from the inner wall of the stator is a central member 23 which directs the flow through discharge portion 210 in a direction oppositely of its entry into the rotary casing. Four web or vane portions 24 disposed at about in the discharge passage support the opposing walls of the stator which defines the discharge passage.

Referring now particularly to FIG. 1, manifold 15 includes an inlet passage 25 with an exterior inlet opening 26 and an outlet passage 27 with an exterior outlet opening 28 for conducting fluent material to and from the pump. Inlet passage 25 extends along the axis of rotation from upstream passage 5 and turns at approximately right angles before terminating in the inlet opening 26. Outlet passage 27 extends along the axis of rotation generally concentric with but inwardly and separated from the inlet passage 25 and turns at approximately right angles before terminating in the outlet opening 28 so as to dispose the inlet and outlet openings in approximately parallel planes with the outlet directing the flow at about from the inlet.

A generally circular flange portion 30' includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced apertures 50 for securing the manifold to the support structure at selected positions through an arc of 360 as will be described more fully hereinafter. An annular portion 31 extends from the outer side of the plate portion 30 over the upstream-end of the casing shell 4.

Between annular portion 31 and easing shell 4 a seal 33 is disposed which comprises the sole exterior seal on the suction side of the pump. A mechanical seal as shown is preferred but it is understood that other seals such as a packing gland will be suitable.

One alternative manifold 15a is illustrated in FIG. 4 wherein the outlet opening 28a is disposed in a plane approximately perpendicular to the plane of the inlet opening 26a so that the discharge flow is about 90 from the intake flow to the pump. The pump manifolds are easily substituted and the positioning of the inlet and outlet may by conveniently arranged to adapt to various transport line configurations. In addition the manifold may be rotated and secured at various positions through an arc of 360 by selection of the number and the spacing of the apertures 50 and associated fasteners which secure the manifold to the mount.

Another variation in the manifold is to provide either the inlet passage or the outlet passage with no outward turn so that either the inlet opening or the outlet opening is concentric with the axis of rotation. With this arrangement, if the outlet opening is concentric with the axis of rotation then the inlet passage will extend outwardly and the inlet opening will be disposed at various acute angles with the axis of rotation and preferably at a right angle. If the inlet opening is concentric with the axis of rotation then the arrangement is reversed for the outlet opening.

The pump hereinabove described is supported by a mount 36 (FIGS. 5 and 6) and driven by a suitable motor 37 directly coupled to the pump. Motor 37 is preferably provided with a standard flange facing 41 for attachment to the mount such as a Nema C flange. Mount 36 includes a base 38 and an upright support 39 for the motor.

Side braces 42 and 43 extend upwardly from opposite sides of the base 33 and are attached to the upright support 39. A forward brace 44 extends upwardly from base 38 and attaches to upright support 40'. A bottom plate 45 is seated on the base and attaches between the upright support 39 and forward brace 4-4.

Support 39 has a hollow central portion through which the shaft 47 of the motor extends and fits into the hub 8. Support 39 is machined to receive the motor flange 41 and includes a plurality of apertures which aline with the apertures of the motor flange 41 through which bolts 49 of other suitable fasteners extend for securing the motor to the mount. Support 40 is generally semicircular in shape as is shown in FIG. 6 and includes a plurality of spaced apertures 60 which aline with the spaced apertures 50 in the manifold and receive fasteners such as bolts or the like for securing the manifold to the mount.

In operation, upon rotation of rotary member 1 by motor 37, the liquid or fluent material being pumped is conducted to the inlet opening 26 by suitable transport lines (not shown) and passes through the pump as indicated by the arrows and out the pump through outlet opening 28. More specifically, in tracing the flowpath this liquid or fluent material is first delivered or drawn by suction through inlet passage 25, then through upstream passage 5 and into intake passage 19 by the centrifugal action of the rotating impeller blades 12. It is then directed into intake portion 21a of the stator 4. On the stationary or discharge side of the pump, the liquid or fluent material passes through intake portion 21a, portion 2112 which widens or increases in volume toward the axis of rotation and is then directed by central member 23 through discharge portion 21c in a direction oppositely of its entry through intake passage 5. Outlet passage 27 then conducts the material through the outlet opening 28.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that only a single seal is required on the suction side of the pump. The pump, mount and motor are an integral assembly and the manifold may be constructed and adjusted to accommodate transport lines of various fixed orientations. The interior of the pump is easily accessible for inspection or repair and a pump embodying the present invention comprises only a few parts with no internal moving parts.

Although I have illustrated specific embodiments of my invention, various modifications may occur to those skilled in the art. Therefore, I do not desire my invention to be limited to the specific details illustrated and described and I intend by the appended claims to cover all modifications to fall within the spirit and scope of this invention.

I claim:

1. A pump comprising a hollow rotary member including a funnel-like casing shell having an upstream passage at one end concentric with its axis of rotation and a casing head closing the opposite end, said casing head having a coupling member for receiving the shaft of a drive motor and an impeller portion comprising a plurality of helical blades formed on its inner surface, a stationary member having an inclined surface facing the impeller portion of the casing shell and defining therewith a radially extending passage interiorly of the rotary member narrowing toward its discharge end for receiving flow from said upstream passage, said stationary member having first and second stationary disc-like portions interconnected in spaced arrangement to define a discharge passage inclusive of an intake portion for receiving the output of the said radially extending passage, an intermediate portion extending radially and widening toward its discharge end and a discharge portion concentric with said axis of rotation so the fluent material delivered into said upstream passage is directed through said radially extending passage under centrifugal influence of the impeller portion during rotation of the rotary member and is directed into the discharge passage of the stationary member and out its discharge portion in a direction oppositely of its entry into the rotary member, said stationary member including manifold means having an inlet passage with an intake opening for passing flow into the upstream passage of the casing shell, and an outlet passage with an outlet opening for passing flow from said discharge passage, the inlet opening disposed in a plane different from the outlet opening, said manifold means including a flanged portion extending over the upstream end of the casing shell, a fluid pressure seal disposed between a surface of said casing shell and a surface of said flanged portion defining with said upstream passage an intake flow path into the interior of the rotary member, said seal comprising the sole external seal for the pump, and a base mount having upright portions supporting the manifold means and drive motor having a shaft coupled to said coupling member of the casing head for supporting said stationary, rotary and drive motor as an integral assembly.

2. A pump comprising first and second head members joined at their peripheries and shaped to form a hollow interior chamber through which fluent material is moved, said first head member having means for coupling it to a drive means by which the head members are rotated conjointly for moving the fluent material in and out of the chamber, stationary conduit means including an outer inlet member and an inner discharge member defining inlet and discharge passages in concentric arrangement for conducting fluent material to and from said chamber through a central portion of the second head member, fluid pressure sealing means supported by a surface of the stationary means in contacting relation with a surface of the second head member concentric with the inlet passage and defining with said inlet passage an intake flow path into the interior of the chamber, said sealing means comprising the sole external seal for the pump, first and second stationary disc-like members interconnected in spaced arrangement and supported from an inner portion of the stationary means in spaced relation to said head members, said first disc-like member being disposed in facing proximity to said first head member and defining with said second disc-like head member a first radially extending passage bounded by stationarysurfaces and communicating with said discharge member passage centrally of the chamber and defining with the second disc-like member a restricted opening at the periphery of the chamber communicating with said radially extending discharge passage, the second disc-like member being disposed in facing proximity to the second head member and defining with said second head member a second radially extending passage in communication with said inlet passage centrally of the chamber, said second passage communicating with said restricted opening at the periphery of the chamber, impeller vanes on the inner surface of the second disc-like member extending into the second passage for directing entering fluent material flow radially outwardly through said second passage, through said restricted opening and then through said first passage.

3. A pump according to claim 2 wherein said first radial passage progressively widens in section toward its discharge end.

4. A pump according to claim 2 wherein said second radial passage progressively narrows in section toward its discharge end.

5. A pump according to claim 2 wherein said first radial passage progressively widen in section and said second radial passage progressively narrows in section toward their respective discharge ends.

6. A pump as set forth in claim 2 wherein said first and second disc-like members are interconnected by at least one web portion extending radially of said disc-like members so that the flow of material through the first radially extending passage is substantially uninterrupted.

7. A pump as set forth in claim 1 wherein said stationary conduit means include radially extending conduit extensions on the inlet and outlet members respectively and disposed in different planes, the head members and said stationary conduit means including means for supporting the conduit means at selected positions through an arc of 360 so as to change the plane in which said conduit extensions are disposed.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,683,474 9/1928 Linderman 10310l 2,470,319 5/1949 Norris 103101 2,974,602 3/1961 Lock 103-101 3,051,089 8/1962 Hany et al. 103-101 3,185,101 5/1965 Brooks et al. 1()31 11 FOREIGN PATENTS 886,143 6/1945 France. 378,662 12/ 1922 Germany.

88,945 8/1921 Switzerland.

DONLEY J. STOCKING, Primary Examiner.

HENRY F. RADUAZO, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1683474 *Mar 4, 1927Sep 4, 1928American Meter CoBlower
US2470319 *Jan 15, 1946May 17, 1949Norris Edward OPump
US2974602 *Jan 27, 1955Mar 14, 1961Borg WarnerFuel booster pump
US3051089 *Jan 13, 1960Aug 28, 1962Henschel Werke GmbhPumps
US3185101 *Mar 6, 1963May 25, 1965Crane CoPump
CH88945A * Title not available
DE378662C *Jul 25, 1923Franz Eisele & Soehne MaschineAbnehmbares Saugrohr fuer Kreiselpumpen
FR886143A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3374747 *Aug 19, 1966Mar 26, 1968Leonard JamesSelf-priming device and method for pumps
US3384023 *Sep 19, 1966May 21, 1968Leonard JamesPump and method of pumping
US3384024 *Jan 9, 1967May 21, 1968Mckenzie Pump CorpCentrifugal pump
US4045145 *Dec 19, 1975Aug 30, 1977Kobe, Inc.Pitot pump with turbulence elimination
US4095966 *Oct 27, 1976Jun 20, 1978Teledyne Industries, Inc.Air cleaner
US4234857 *Apr 13, 1979Nov 18, 1980Calspan CorporationCentrifugal gasdynamic window
US4548545 *Apr 4, 1983Oct 22, 1985Dorr-Oliver IncorporatedCentrifugal pump with deaeration chamber
US5009570 *May 2, 1989Apr 23, 1991Maytag CorporationMounting assembly for the impeller of a fluid pump
US5226790 *Jun 6, 1991Jul 13, 1993Calpeda SpaPeripheral-longitudinal diffusser for a single-impeller centrifugal pump
US6431828 *Apr 5, 2000Aug 13, 2002Envirotech Pumpsystems, Inc.Non-planar rotor cover for a centrifugal pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification415/88, 415/120, 415/208.2, 415/91, 415/913, 415/174.2, 415/89
International ClassificationF04D1/12
Cooperative ClassificationF04D1/12, Y10S415/913
European ClassificationF04D1/12